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I recently moved permanently from the US to Germany, and I am a Swedish citizen.

I got a US Virtual post mail address but Bank of America refused it automatically.

Can I simply change my address to my German address online and all will be well; I'll be able to receive credit cards and notices in Germany? Or could they will cancel my account if I do so?

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    Why don't you set up paper free alerts? You can get all these notices online. You can definitely keep a Bank account open even if you reside abroad, you should update your account and fill up a Form W8-BEN - irs.gov/forms-pubs/… I'm not sure about the implication on credit cards.
    – nikhil
    Aug 31 '17 at 20:13
  • @nikhil why don't you make that comment an answer, potentially adding some sources (or personal experience) about this working out with Bank of America or other banks?
    – mts
    Aug 31 '17 at 21:28
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    In my experience dealing with American banks and overseas customers, you have to actually call them to change your address, you can't do it online (not BofA, my experience is with another bank). And the agent has to be a bit creative in making your foreign address fit in their address form. But ultimately they will be able to mail things like credit cards directly to you. Aug 31 '17 at 23:39
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    Thanks, I'm reading anecdotal reports of people getting their accounts closed due to moving abroad due to some part of the patriot act. I haven't heard any specific bank of america cases. You can actually just change your address to an international one without any trickery online, but your existing credit cards will stop working for some reason. Sep 1 '17 at 21:02
  • Possible duplicate: expatriates.stackexchange.com/questions/21440/…
    – krubo
    Feb 5 at 18:48
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Yes. I maintain a Bank Of America account and have done so for years after I moved to Europe. I get regular statements and get my debit cards on time as the previous expires. They have my UK address and it doesn't seem to be any problem.

One thing to note: They will ask if you are a citizen of the country of your residence. You may be uncomfortable with that, but you will have to give some answer to this question in order to access your account online.

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  • Why would one be uncomfortable disclosing that one is not a citizen of one's country of residence?
    – phoog
    Mar 8 at 22:07
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    It's not any of their business and has nothing to do with their banking services. So why would they block access to your account (and your money) to ask such a question? Especially strange if you've had an account with them for decades. If they asked it as an optional survey, yeah I probably wouldn't care.
    – ouflak
    Mar 8 at 22:10
  • It may or may not have anything to do with their banking services, for example if there is some legal obligation they have to collect that information. I agree that there shouldn't be, but I don't know that there isn't.
    – phoog
    Mar 8 at 23:29

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