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I recently quit my job in the UK to educate myself more and try to find a job in non profit sector (database management, salesforce, data analysis, M&E). I've been volunteering my skills for a while now and decided to apply to a few jobs to see what happens.

One organisation from NYC really liked me and wants a phone interview and upon it being successful face to face interview.

In my CV I clearly stated that my native language is not English (despite full professional proficiency in English) and that I am currently in South America for a volunteer placement.

I have a US B2 tourist visa, but since I have no address in my CV I didn't mention I will need a working visa.

I'm trying to be fair but at the same time to see how far can I go.

My question is two-fold.

  1. Will it be easier to get a US working visa with a non-profit behind me that offered me a position and are willing to help?

  2. When should I mention my situation (non-US citizen, no working visa)? Should it be during the phone interview, or should I keep it about my skills, see if they think I am a good fit and let them decide later if I'm worth the trouble of obtaining the visa?

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When should I mention my situation (non-US citizen, no working visa), should it be during phone interview, or should I keep it about my skills, see if they thing I am a good fit and let them decide later if I'm worth the trouble of obtaining the visa?

I think you should tell them immediately. Getting a visa can be a difficult process, particularly if the company is not familiar with the process. For software engineering positions, they typically state very clearly whether they accept visa candidates or not.

Anyway, I'd advise you to tell them as soon as possible. It will be better for both parties.

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This expands the existing answer to give a bit more explanation of why the employer should know about the need for a visa as soon as possible.

Even if they sponsor visa applications, and not all organizations do, the job may not be suitable, you may not be qualified, or the timing may not meet their needs. See, for example, H-1B Specialty Occupations, DOD Cooperative Research and Development Project Workers, and Fashion Models for some of the issues.

Many, but not all, non-profits are subject to the H1-B cap. The cap for fiscal year 2018, October 1, 2017 through September 30, 2018, has already been filled. Organizations that do sponsor and are subject to the cap may time their consideration of alien applicants to have the applications ready to go the day the application window for a fiscal year opens.

If there is no chance of you getting the job, it is better for everyone, yourself included, if the application is rejected early. It is better to spend your time on applications that might succeed. If they don't feel you have wasted their time, the employer is more likely to help by e.g. suggesting related organizations in countries where it is easier to get a visa.

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