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If a person seriously considers defecting to North Korea to avoid imprisonment in a Western country, what dangers or difficulties should such an individual be prepared to face?

How likely is such a person to be imprisoned and subsequently tortured or executed as soon as they are within North Korean borders?

Even if they are granted an ordinary life of an ordinary North Korean, how likely are they to be subsequently imprisoned and tortured or executed for a very petty crime, like not paying enough respect to Kim or failing to meet work efficiency requirements?

Considering the notorious grave human right violations of the North Korean government, even in spite of the latest reduction of the rampant poverty, how does life in North Korea compare to serving a prison sentence in a Western country?

How harsh is the state's control over every day life?

What are the other dangers?

If the defector changes his mind in the future, how likely is he to leave North Korea? How likely is he to be executd on sight, or imprisoned and subsequently tortured or executed anyway for trying?

closed as off-topic by Giorgio, dda, ouflak, SztupY Nov 30 '17 at 12:19

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to be about expatriates, within the scope defined in the help center." – Giorgio, dda, ouflak, SztupY
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Scratch of an answer:

how likely are they to be subsequently imprisoned and tortured or executed for a very petty crime

A number of cases like the execution of a terrapine factory manager for failing to breed enough lobsters, sentencing to hard labor those who were not mourning hard enough about the death of Kim Jong-Il or imprisoning and subsequently likely torturing to death an American student guilty of taking down a Kim Jong-Un propaganda poster from a forbidden area seem upsetting enough.

How harsh is the state's control over every day life?

Waking people in the capital city up every morning with creepy music doesn't seem promising.

What are the other dangers?

Apparently people unlucky enough to live nearby North Korean secret nuke test facility suffer from grave diseases and are banned from seeking medical attention; also North Koreans seem to be notoriously severly infected by parasitic diseases thanks to the widespread use of night soil as a fertilizer.

If the defector changes his mind in the future, how likely is he to leave North Korea?

Not likely. I can't find a source for this now, but I remember reading about a man who defected to North Korea; he was greeted there for propaganda reasons, but later he changed his mind and attempted to flee North Korea; but NK government didn't want to allow him to do this.

Much more remains to be told. This is a worthy read: Human rights in North Korea on Wikipedia

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