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In this PDF document, it says:

Are there exceptions?
Yes. You do not have to prove any knowledge of German, as a rule, if one of the following statements applies:

[...]

• Your spouse is a citizen of Australia, Israel, Japan, Canada, the Republic of Korea, New Zealand , United States of America, Andorra, Honduras, Monaco or San Marino.

Is this real? I am Australian and already married in Germany and living here. I'm about to apply for a visa but I still have no German language certificates and can't speak German, as I was told and read this before we married. So I thought I can learn German on my own time (after I apply for my visa) and own money. I'm just going off their information. Surely they can't reject me for reading off their website.

closed as unclear what you're asking by Scott Earle, Dipen Shah, Giorgio, Mark Mayo Jun 25 '18 at 1:22

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Could you edit the question to include less copy and paste text? It distracts from your question. Put links to German government websites instead. – user16259 Jun 10 '18 at 7:06
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    Sadly, having read this question twice, I have not managed to work out what you are asking. "Is this real?" Well, it's written there ... – Scott Earle Jun 11 '18 at 4:22
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Would you like to move to Germany to your spouse? [...] In these cases, you must demonstrate before you enter the country that you possess a simple knowledge of German1.[...] Are there exceptions? Yes. You do not have to prove any knowledge of German, as a rule, if one of the following statements applies: [...] ¢ Your spouse is a citizen of Australia, Israel, Japan, Canada, the Republic of Korea, New Zealand , United States of America, Andorra, Honduras, Monaco or San Marino.

You have to read it very carefully because it's easy to mix up, especially as anybody with some common sense will read it the other way round. This is not a translation problem, it's just as badly worded in German. But common sense and the law don't mix well:

"Your spouse" is the person already in Germany. The first sentence makes that clear. If your spouse in Germany is German, that exception does not apply.

Yes, I know, it makes no sense. A Japanese person moving to their Japanese parter, neither have to prove German skills, yet an Australian moving to a German partner has to.

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    It actually makes a lot of sense, because it is assumed the residency of an all-foreign couple is non-permanent by nature, so having command of the German language may be a bit much. For people married to a German and moving to Germany, it's much more likely they are going to live in Germany for years. Some investment can be expected. – Janka Jun 10 '18 at 13:35

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