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My case is very specific so I don't think anyone has asked a similar question in here. Also, I don't know if this is the appropriate website (but I think so).

I was born in Brazil 20 years ago to an Italian family. Both my parents and grand-parents are born in Brazil as well, but my great-grand fathers are italian, so I have right to italian citizenship (some members of my family are already italian citizens).

Now, I was planning to apply to italian citizenship here in Brazil, but the proccess is long and might take up to 10 years.

There is a possibility that I might move to France next year to live there for about 2-3 years. My question is:

Applying to jus sanguinis citizenship for Italy while residing in France is faster than living in Brazil, since I'll be living in an EU country, or the process is the same? I'm asking because I don't know what should I do: Apply for citizenship here in Brazil or wait to apply in Europe.

Thanks in advance.

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  • This is the wrong place, but I have Italian citizenship through decent though. You have to apply in the country you're residing in. You can get your application moved if you move. At the moment processing time is around 2 years in the UK where I live, but this is dependent on embassy(Brexit has caused lots of people in UK to apply), I can't see many people applying in France. A new law just passed means the are allowed to take up to 4 years to process your application. Applying and getting it in Brazil will make it very easy to move to France. – BritishSam Nov 12 '18 at 15:24
  • Questions about moving to other countries and about citizenship belong on Expatriates. You can flag the question for migration or just post a new one there and close this. – phoog Nov 12 '18 at 15:29
  • @BritishSam But supposing I live in France, can I apply for the italian citizenship in an Italian consulate in France even if I am not a french national? As for applying and getting in Brazil, I have no time: It takes about 6-10 years to get your citizenship in here, and if I go to France, I'll be going next year. – Vitor C Goergen Nov 12 '18 at 20:56
  • @VitorCGoergen yes you can in any country as long as you are a legal resident. You need to prove this with a resident card and a utility bill / bank statement for your address. – BritishSam Nov 13 '18 at 8:50
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    Technically, you are not "applying for" Italian citizenship -- jus sanguinis Italian citizenship is automatic at birth. If you have it, you already have it, and have had it from birth according to Italian law, even if you didn't know it. You are just trying to get documentation of the Italian citizenship that you already have. – user102008 Nov 14 '18 at 7:26
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Yes you can but you must have a resident permit that is valid for no less than a year.

Translated from french:

Non-French citizens, of Italian stock, coming from other States (Argentina, Brazil, etc.) are requested to consult the website of the competent Italian Consulate, in order to know the documentation to be presented. Applicants must be in possession of a regular French residence permit of not less than one year.

Consulate General of Italy in Nice

  • Apparently that changes with the city, for example, in the website of Paris consulate you can find: (Translated from Italian): "Non-French citizens, of Italian stock, coming from other States (Argentina, Brazil, etc.) are requested to consult the website of the competent Italian Consulate, in order to know the documentation to be presented. Applicants must be in possession of a French residence permit of no less than two years." consparigi.esteri.it/consolato_parigi/it/i_servizi/… – Vitor C Goergen Nov 13 '18 at 11:06
  • The problem is that in the diplomation program that I am applying, one usually gets a 1-year permit which is later renewed. – Vitor C Goergen Nov 13 '18 at 11:08
  • @VitorCGoergen well my interpretation seems wrong and i'll correct my answer, it says no less than a year, your permit would not be less than a year. – BritishSam Nov 13 '18 at 11:33
  • Exactly, for Nice consulate. Metz and Paris consulates require a 2-year residence permit. – Vitor C Goergen Nov 13 '18 at 13:01
  • @VitorCGoergen sorry I never saw that, you should maybe change your question to Paris instead of France in general. Is there anywhere you could move to under the Mercosur immigration agreement to get it done quickly before you move to France? Somewhere with a smaller waiting time. – BritishSam Nov 13 '18 at 13:47

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