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My father was born in the Netherlands but at the time of my birth (1989 in RSA) he was no longer a Dutch Citizen, is there any hope for me getting a Dutch passport? Please help.

EDIT:

My father left the Netherlands when he was two and, as I mentioned before, lost his citizenship by naturalising in RSA when he was 39, can he not regain his citizenship via the Option procedure? (See condition 5 under 'who can apply' in Option procedure) If he regains his Dutch citizenship, I can in turn, receive mine if he acknowledges me (we would need to provide DNA evidence according to Dutch citizenship by birth/acknowledgement). Does this all sound plausible?

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    Did your father lose his Dutch nationality by naturalizing in South Africa (or another country)? If so, how old was he when he naturalized? – phoog Mar 27 at 16:04
  • Yes he lost it by naturalizing in South Africa. He was about 39 when he did this. – Michael Cromberge Mar 28 at 16:12
  • In that case, the first comment would appear to be correct. @Traveller, would you like to post it as a proper answer? – phoog Mar 29 at 16:11
  • With regard to your edit, your father would have to move to the Netherlands for one year before being able to exercise the option procedure. But even if he did, that would not change your citizenship because he won't have been a Dutch citizen when you were born. The page you link to is somewhat imprecise about this, but acknowledgement normally only applies to children born out of wedlock. Furthermore, the law itself suggests that this route only exists for minor children over the age of 7. – phoog Jun 25 at 15:35
  • There's another possibility: it used to be the case that a woman married to a Dutch man was automatically Dutch. I believe this changed in 1963, but I am not certain of the date. If your mother and father married before the change, and he naturalized in South Africa after the change, it is perhaps possible that she retained her Dutch nationality. If she was a Dutch citizen when you were born, then you may have received Dutch nationality from her, in which case you might yourself be former Dutch. But if I'm right about the change being in 1963, this seems unlikely indeed. – phoog Jun 25 at 15:53
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In a comment you mention that your father lost his Dutch nationality by naturalizing in South Africa when he was about 39. In the circumstances you describe, it would appear that your only option to get a Dutch passport would be through naturalization after having lived in the Netherlands for 5 years

https://www.government.nl/topics/dutch-nationality/becoming-a-dutch-national

Note that if a South African citizen does not obtain prior permission to retain their South African citizenship they will automatically lose it on voluntary acquisition of a foreign citizenship. https://www.sahc.org.au/citizenship/Dual_Citizenship.htm

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