3

I am an Italian citizen who lives in the UK.

when applying for an Indian Visa (or any other Visa) they ask for the place of issue of my passport.

That is the Italian consulate in London UK.

what is the right answer to this question?

Is it London Uk or Italy?

enter image description here

  • It's not befitting that you portray your passport number...you never know...just an advice. – abdul Dec 11 '19 at 22:20
  • 1
    I have now removed my passport number, thank you – Marcello Miorelli Dec 21 '19 at 17:11
  • Next time be very wary of what you do with your personal information. – abdul Dec 21 '19 at 17:29
3

Your passport's data page (the page with your picture) displays an entry for "Autorità/Authority/Autorité." As noted in the comments below, the entry there is likely to display "Ministro Degli Affari Esteri," the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, as the issuing governmental agency. The Passport itself does not say where (physically) the passport was issued.

If in this Indian visa application you may only choose "London (UK)" or "Italy" as the "place of issuance," I'd say the correct response is "London."

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    The entry is actually "Autorità/Authority/Autorité" (there is no Spanish on the biodata page), and it says "Il ministro degli affari esteri" or "ministro affari esteri," both meaning "the ministry of foreign affairs." It's preprinted on the form, so it's the same for all passports. That is not a place; it is a government body. – phoog Dec 9 '19 at 18:47
  • 1
    @phoog Not so in all passports. My US passport was issued 2012, and I just looked with a magnifying glass. The word is indeed "autoridad." Those three words are in the same preprinted font and weight as the words such as "Nationality / Nationalité / Nacionalidad" which appear next to the personal information added upon issuance. The words "United States Department of State," however, are printed in the same font as the personal information, suggesting that a passport issued in another place (mine came from the NPC in Sterling VA) would show another physical location. – DavidSupportsMonica Dec 9 '19 at 19:01
  • 3
    The question is about Italian passports. Of course other countries' passports will be different. – phoog Dec 9 '19 at 19:02
  • 1
    @phoog That is indeed correct, the OP's passport will be different. I'll amend the answer. – DavidSupportsMonica Dec 9 '19 at 19:04
1

I think it means the place where it's been physically issued to you, so it can be any country other than Italy, otherwise they wouldn't have put the option to begin with if every Italian passport was issued in Italy only. If you've been issued your passport in the UK, just put UK, Indian officials would know anyway that there are consulates, I don't think they're dumb to that extent

| improve this answer | |
  • "they wouldn't have put the option to begin with if every Italian passport was issued in Italy only" Bear in mind that the "they" here are the Indian authors of the visa application form. All English and Welsh passports (don't know about Scottish) are issued by the Passport office in Peterborough. In contrast German passports are issued by the local municipality. The Indians want to know where a German passport was issued, even if the field contains no useful information for an English passport. – Martin Bonner supports Monica Dec 11 '19 at 15:01
  • I don't get what you mean. Anyway your point seemingly doesn't contradict what I wrote, because the option put in the website includes even [country] passports issued in [name country], so I don't understand. – abdul Dec 11 '19 at 15:06
  • Local municipality or passport office isn't relevant, because the option states "place of issue", so the issuance entity is not relevant here in this case. I was addressing an other thing. – abdul Dec 11 '19 at 15:08
  • "The place of issue" for English passports is always "Peterborough", the "place of issue" for my neighbour's passport will be "<our village>". – Martin Bonner supports Monica Dec 11 '19 at 15:15
  • 2
    Then you put your village's name. By the way there's no such thing as a English or Welsh passport. There are only British passports in the UK. – abdul Dec 11 '19 at 15:17

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.