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I am a naturalized American citizen and I am filing for my parent's I-130. Now, on the USCIS website, in proof of citizenship section it says:

Upload documents that show that you are a U.S. citizen. Examples of these documents include:

A copy of your birth certificate, issued by a civil registrar, vital statistics office, or other civil authority showing that you were born in the United States
A copy of your naturalization certificate or certificate of citizenship issued by USCIS or the former Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS)
A copy of Form FS-240, Consular Report of Birth Abroad (CRBA), issued by a U.S. Embassy or U.S. Consulate
A copy of your unexpired U.S. passport
An original statement from a U.S. consular officer verifying that you are a U.S. citizen with a valid passport

What I am failing to understand in these instructions is that IF these documents are all required or one of them is sufficed?

I do have a US Passport. I also do have a naturalization certificate but it's a little torn so I prefer that if my passport is enough then I would like to submit only the passport. However, in these instructions, it is not very clear that which or all of these docs are required?

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    It cannot be "all" because, for example, a person was either born in the US or abroad, not both. They were either a citizen from birth, or naturalized. – Patricia Shanahan Feb 17 at 7:39
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    It seems pretty clear that they can’t require all the documents, as (virtually? There may be a counter example) no one will possess the all of the first three on the list. – rhialto Feb 17 at 7:40
  • @rhialto I can't think of any circumstances in which someone could have both a US birth certificate and a consular report of birth abroad. Maybe someone born in a foreign territory that later became a US state, but I don't think that's happened since the US began issuing consular reports of birth abroad. – phoog Feb 18 at 5:30
  • My question was more around requiring both naturalization very and US passport. Sorry if I want very clear on my question. – Lost Feb 18 at 5:31
  • @PatriciaShanahan the child of a diplomat can be both born in the US and naturalized. However, such a person is not a citizen from birth, so the second sentence is true for the child of a diplomat. My father, however, is both naturalized and a citizen from birth: he was naturalized in the 1950s and then in 1994 a law was passed making him (along with others in his situation), retroactively, a citizen from birth. But he doesn't have a CRBA. – phoog Feb 18 at 5:34
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Yes, a valid US passport is enough. Any one of the items is enough. See the I-130 instructions, General Requirements #3 (page 6):

  1. What documents do you need to show that you are a U.S. citizen?

A. A copy of your birth certificate, issued by a civil registrar, vital statistics office, or other civil authority showing that you were born in the United States;

B. A copy of your naturalization certificate or certificate of citizenship issued by USCIS or the former Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS);

C. A copy of Form FS-240, Consular Report of Birth Abroad (CRBA), issued by a U.S. Embassy or U.S. Consulate;

D. A copy of your unexpired U.S. passport; or

E. An original statement from a U.S. consular officer verifying that you are a U.S. citizen with a valid passport.

If you do not have any of the above documents and you were born in the United States, see the What if an official document is not available section of these Instructions.

The "or" indicates that any one of the items is sufficient.

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