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Suppose, an immigrant emigrated from Mexico to the UK. After obtaining British citizenship, he/she renounces his/her Mexican citizenship.

Later, this person gets involved in a serious crime or offense which asks for the British government to strip his/her British citizenship.

How can the British government strip his/her citizenship as the person would be countryless?

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  • This question belongs to Law Stack Exchange, since the answer would be be based on the Nationality Law of a given country. The goal is mostly to avoid a person becoming stateless, but there is nothing in 'International Law' that can prevent it from happening. Jun 14 '20 at 19:53
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There are no particular crimes or offenses that "asks for the British government to strip his/her British citizenship". The only provision which allows the British government to involuntarily strip someone's British citizenship that was properly obtained is section 40 subsection (2) of the British Nationality Act 1981, which allows the Secretary of State to strip someone's British nationality if he/she "is satisfied that deprivation is conducive to the public good". Under subsection (4), this stripping is only allowed if it would not make the person stateless (except for British citizens by naturalization, which can be stripped under subsection (4A) under certain conditions if the Secretary of State "has reasonable grounds for believing" that the person is able to acquire another nationality).

(Note that I said "citizenship that was properly obtained", because if the citizenship was obtained through fraud or misrepresentation, it can be stripped under subsections (3) or (6) even if it will make the person stateless. But, arguably, that isn't so much a "stripping" of citizenship, as a determination that the person was never properly a citizen in the first place.)

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  • @user366312: and?
    – user102008
    Jun 14 '20 at 20:11
  • There are no particular crimes or offenses that "asks for the British government to strip his/her British citizenship". --- ???
    – user366312
    Jun 14 '20 at 20:16
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    @user366312: The only condition for stripping properly-obtained British citizenship under the law is that the Secretary be "satisfied that deprivation is conducive to the public good". This is a subjective determination and doesn't have to be connected to any crime or offense. The Secretary can decide that deprivation is "conducive to the public good" even if the person hasn't been convicted of any offense; and conversely, there is no offense that requires the Secretary to decide that deprivation is "conducive to the public good".
    – user102008
    Jun 14 '20 at 20:23

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