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US president Trump has issued a visa ban on a number of non-immigrant visa categories, put into effect as of June 24 2020.

This question has to do with an individual holding a J-1 visa, currently residing in the US. This indivdual works as a research assistant at a University.

The question is this: Will such an individual be able to leave the US to later be able to re-enter on this type of visa?

I would appreciate information from strictly reliable sources.

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  • Regardless of meeting the exemption, are you willing to risk it? Would you be able to convince an Airlines official in your country of origin that you should be allowed to board? – nikhil Jun 26 '20 at 0:52
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Yes, the individual will be able to re-enter.

The proclamation does not apply for anyone who meets any condition under Section 3:

Sec. 3. Scope of Suspension and Limitation on Entry. (a) The suspension and limitation on entry pursuant to section 2 of this proclamation shall apply only to any alien who:

(i) is outside the United States on the effective date of this proclamation;

(ii) does not have a nonimmigrant visa that is valid on the effective date of this proclamation; and

(iii) do not have an official travel document other than a visa (such as a transportation letter, an appropriate boarding foil, or an advance parole document) that is valid on the effective date of this proclamation or issued on any date thereafter that permits him or her to travel to the United States and seek entry or admission.

The individual is:

  • inside the US
  • has a valid nonimmigrant visa
  • has a travel document

Therefore, this proclamation does not apply to them.

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  • "The proclamation does not apply for anyone who meets any condition under Section 3" I think that should instead be "The proclamation does not apply for anyone who fails to meet any condition under Section 3", i.e. the proclamation (the ban) only applies to people who meet all 3 conditions. – user102008 Jun 25 '20 at 20:25
  • @user102008 Nope, it’s any of the 3 conditions – Xnero Jun 25 '20 at 20:28
  • The "conditions" are the opposite of the conditions you are thinking of. One of the "conditions" is: the individual is outside the US. So are you saying that anyone who meets the condition of being outside the US is not subject to the proclamation? Of course not. You are saying that anyone who is inside the US on the effective date is not subject to the proclamation. In this case, the person fails to meet the first condition (fails to meet the condition of being outside the US). – user102008 Jun 25 '20 at 20:31
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    I don't personally think that it's a good idea to chance this, the moment that they leave the US, they no longer have any status. So, for example if the counterfoil on their passport is expired and they have a valid approved I-797 it's quite likely that they won't be able to acquire another valid counterfoil. – nikhil Jun 26 '20 at 0:57

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