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If I live in the Netherlands as a non-Dutch EU citizen and would like to marry my non-EU-citizen fiancee (with the intent of having them come and stay) there, the immigration service's website seems to imply that in order to do so, the non-EU partner would have to obtain an mvv, including (in our circumstances) the requirement to undergo the basic civic integration examination abroad.

However, if we were to marry somewhere else, my partner could apply for verification against EU law as a means to be exempt from the integration examination. What I am wondering now, however: would it be possible for my partner to get married to me in the Netherlands on a short-stay/visitor visa (which I could sponsor) and then apply for verfification against EU law as part of that same stay?

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Looking at Amsterdam's website suggests that this is permitted. However, they ask for a declaration that your marriage is not a marriage of convenience (PDF) because of the rights that the marriage will bestow on the non-EU spouse.

If you live in a different municipality, you will of course want to find the corresponding information for your municipality instead.

Once the marriage is concluded, your spouse can be required to leave the Netherlands only in line with the free movement directive: if you lose your right of residence, if your marriage is found to be one of convenience, or if your spouse's presence in the Netherlands is found to be a threat to public health, safety, or policy.

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  • Important notes: that marrying in NL might require some documents that don't exist in their original country (or countries), so they'll have to ask the local embassy for them (e.g. the so-called "celibacy certificate" if it is your first marriage); it is not necessary to marry to obtain a family reunion visa and if OP has a temporary residence permit (e.g. work permit), the partner doesn't need to do the civil integration exam Jul 26 at 6:35
  • @JulianaKarasawaSouza OP is an EU citizen so does not have any residence permit, and there is no need for a family reunion visa nor for the civil integration exam.
    – phoog
    Jul 27 at 1:26

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