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I am from India and my girlfriend from Poland. We are planning to get married in April 2016. But I just find out that even if we get married in Poland. I am not allowed to live and work in Poland with her? Regarding for this I have got few questions your kind suggestion would be really helpful for us.

  • If we get married in Denmark will our marriage consider legal? She is from Poland and I am from India coming to Denmark on tourist visa could we able to get married there? And stay and look for work together.

  • Which EU country would allow us to move in tougher after getting married in Denmark?

  • Which EU country is good to getting married and allow us to live and look for work together?

  • Could you marry in Poland or not? That might an option, even if you can't stay there afterwards. – Gala Jul 30 '15 at 15:52
  • Why do you say you can't live and work in Poland after getting married? Here is some basic information about how the spouse of a Polish citizen can get a Temporary Residence Permit in Poland. – krubo Mar 16 '18 at 0:25
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If we get married in Denmark will our marriage consider legal?

Yes. You'd have two option, either jump through hoops of Danish bureaucracy and get married under their rules or get married in Embassy of Poland under Polish rules. Either way the marriage is fully legal.

Which EU country would allow us to move in tougher after getting married in Denmark?

All of them. This is one of the basic EU rules. Spouses of EU citizens can stay and work. Limitation is that it has to be same country as the country of residence of your spouse.

Which EU country is good to getting married and allow us to live and look for work together?

In your situation it's easiest to either get married in Poland or in Polish Embassy in India. Getting married in country that neither of you is citizen is possible, but significantly more complicated. Once your married, see above: EU citizen and their spouses can live and work in any EU country.

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I have no idea how easy or complicated it is to get married in Denmark but once you are married, you should be able to live with your wife under EU rules in any EU country where she works, except Poland itself which might apply additional restrictions (if she has no work and no money, it's more complicated). See ec.europea.eu and Your Europe for an overview.

If you get married in a non-EU country, more paperwork would probably be needed (translation, apostille, etc.) but it would still in theory be possible. You don't need to stay in the country where you married either.

  • I don't understand why there would be an exception for Poland. Can you elaborate on that point? – Greg Hewgill Jul 30 '15 at 19:40
  • @GregHewgill EU freedom of movement rules only apply outside a person's country of origin. Member states basically commit themselves to treat citizens from other member states in a certain way but are still free to regulate their own affairs (more-or-less) freely. As EU citizens' rights have become more comprehensive, it leads to somewhat paradoxical situations in which nationals face more restrictive rules than other EU citizens. That's the reason behind strange loopholes like the Surinder Singh route. – Gala Jul 30 '15 at 20:09
  • Of course, it's not forbidden for the OP to live in Poland but he would only be able to do that under (potentially less favorable) national rules and he seems to think that it would not possible for him at the moment (I don't know precisely what the rules are in Poland but it's for example possible that his wife would have to prove she has sufficient income or that her dwelling is big enough for the family, whereas such conditions are illegal under EU rules). – Gala Jul 30 '15 at 20:09
  • (I edited the answer a bit to try to clarify all this) – Gala Jul 30 '15 at 20:10

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