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The numbers in the picture below is confusing to me, I have lived in different flats in London and never came across a similar system. Do they refer to the floor? the flat number?

Recently I have sent a parcel to Glasgow from Mail Boxes Etc office and it came back because the address is so confusing that they themselves have got it wrong even when they send hundreds of parcels everyday.

Add to that that various high-profile companies/websites like Argos reject the "/" when you enter the address manually, so you are either lucky to have the address already in their database or you need to substitute the "/" with an equivalent of letters. I have used "of" three times so far, the postman hasn't understand that twice.

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closed as off-topic by Greg Hewgill, Mark Mayo Jan 28 '16 at 14:01

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to be about expatriates, within the scope defined in the help center." – Greg Hewgill, Mark Mayo
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Guess: floor/flat so the first example is Ground Floor, Flat 1 – mkennedy Jan 25 '16 at 14:23
  • FYI, Sadly, it's depressingly common for websites to disallow characters actually used in addresses. At least some will even let you look up your address by postcode, then reject the address it looked up for "invalid" characters! – Gagravarr Jan 27 '16 at 12:14
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As mkennedy says, it's the floor/flat.

When I lived in Glasgow it was in the top floor flat (4 floors) on the right, so the address was

Flat 4/2, 129 XXXXX Road, Glasgow G12 XXX

There isn't an explicit numbering in the flats, but usual to number from the left (stair) side, so left would be /1, and so on until you include all flats on the floor.

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