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Is there any credit card issuer in the NL where I can have some cash back?

Cash back credit/debit cards are such that award customers an occasional rebate equal to a percentage of their purchases. It's not literally "cash" in the sense of physical currency - usually a check or a credit on your account - but it's different from cards that offer rebates in other forms, such as airline miles. Specific examples from the US are Chase Freedom and Quicksilver, which give a 1.5% rebate rate.

closed as off-topic by Scott Earle, SztupY Oct 3 '16 at 16:44

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    Short answer - no chance. Consumer credit card interchange fees are capped at 0.3%, so there's not enough margin for US-style cashback – Gagravarr Sep 25 '16 at 16:25
  • People not from the US may not know what "cash back" cards are. I don't. What kind of cache do you expect to get back, and for what? – einpoklum Sep 26 '16 at 6:53
  • @einpoklum: With these cards, the customer gets a rebate equal to a percentage of their purchases, usually 1-2%. So if you have a card with 1.5% cash back, and you use it for $10,000 worth of purchases, you get a payment of $150. It's not literally "cash" in the sense of physical currency - usually a check or a credit on your account - but the word "cash" distinguishes it from cards that offer rebates in other forms (airline miles are a popular alternative). – Nate Eldredge Oct 1 '16 at 17:26
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I believe you are unlikely to find such cards offered in the Netherlands. The reason is that for a credit card company to offer 1.5% rebate on purchases, those purchases must have a high mark-up to begin with, or alternatively an extra-high fee for credit card use. As the Netherlands is more of a debit-card culture, the former would be rare - you are most likely to find lower markups with no possibility of paying with a credit card at all. When credit cards are allowed, you will likely notice the credit card use fee, and I would think businesses/credit card companies would not be motivated to hike that up further for you to get your "cash back".

Bottom line: You probably won't be using credit cards much anyway, so don't bother.

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