19

In my experience (I'm from France), it's much faster than what you're used to in Germany. That said, the US is a big place, if you try to find an apartment in San Francisco or New York City, it's definitely going to take more time than in smaller, less expensive and less saturated cities. Through friends (college) I was able to find an apartment in Orlando, ...


15

There is an important difference between Polish and German flat rent market. In Poland you often find landlords accepting the first tenant they get, without doing any background check nor demanding any deposit (in German: “Kaution”). In Germany on the other hand (or in most Western countries), it is normal that you have to provide a secure and stable source ...


11

I was born in South Africa and travelled and lived to/in Cape Town, Durban and other places - I still have many friends that live and work in Cape town and Johannesburg and lead normal lives. My answer is lengthy, but really very shortened. Over the years you will gain a sense of necessity for safety where ever you live in South Africa, not just Cape Town, ...


10

I lived in Cape Town for 6 month where I stayed in Observatory, an area where many students live and where crime is said to be rather bad for Cape Town standards. Nevertheless, I never felt unsafe at home, even at night and I was never robbed even though I experienced "proactive begging" where people came to my house which I shared with others, asking for ...


10

I'd like to add a few points to the excellent details in the other answers: Don't pay a broker's fee up front. This is almost certainly a scam. You don't have a US credit history. Outside of parts of a city with lots of students or ex-pats this may be an issue. You may be asked to provide other proofs of financial stability. Apartment photos on Craigslist ...


8

An “attestation d'emploi” or “attestation de l'employeur” should be enough, if producing your work contract is not practical. Here are a few templates from various real estate agents (PDF) that seem pretty typical. One of these agents seems to insist that clients use their template and nothing else so yours might have one as well. What they all ask for is ...


8

AED 10,000 may be a lot in your country, but here you shouldn't convert it to your currency every time you buy something, because it might be 3 times more expensive, unless you really make your own food every day and drink mostly water. For rent, if that is not included it can reach up to AED 5000pm for low-to-middle class 1 bedroom. For sharing rooms it ...


7

Here is a translation of the corresponding explanation on the French Wikipedia site: T1, T2, T3, etc: T is used for Type, and corresponds to a type of apartment with the number of main rooms indicated. By main room, one means living room, dining room, and bedrooms. Kitchens and bathrooms are not included in the number. Therefore, an apartment with a living ...


7

Yes, this is possible. You can find a temporary, furnished, and likely expensive apartment through a portal such as ownerdirect, airbnb, or similar services. This one you would rent for a short period, perhaps a week or a month. You would likely have to pay in advance, so use online reviews to see if someone can be trusted. Then, with this as a basis, ...


7

The short answer is, yes, it is possible to find an apartment that fast. However, it really depends on how flexible you can be. Although it can vary from city to city, there are really two avenues you can take: Broker By broker, I mean you walk into an apartment brokerage and say "I'm looking for a [studio/1-bedroom/townhouse] for [$1200/$2100/$4000] a ...


7

Finding an apartment to rent, even for short term, can be tricky if you do it online. I just moved to Edinburgh, from France, so I can at least speak about my experience: I booked 2 weeks at an airbnb, to have an address to crash in when I arrived in the city. From there, I searched for a real apartment to settle in. Between the visit and the actual day I ...


6

I think it depends a lot on the city, since some have very active rental markets and others don't. It will also depend heavily on your budget, which amenities you want/require, and on other factors such as availability of public transportation and distance to downtown. These are all factors that require someone who is familiar with the local market to give ...


6

Ah yes, finding a place to live in Germany… 3 apartments in the last 9 months, but now I'm finally happy with where I am : ) The truth: Chances of getting a contract on your own before you arrive will be very slim to impossible. And once in Germany, it may take quite a while to get an apartment to your liking. I suggest finding a cheap hotel that can rent a ...


6

It's 99% certainly a scam. The exact same thing happened to me twice when I was in your position, including the passport scan. Guy said he was working in the UK and wanted to rent out his apartment, in a very good location in Amsterdam, for a low price. Don't bother verifying his passport. I'm sorry to have to break it to you; I realize you wanted the ...


5

No. According to HDB, the eligibility criteria for a new flat in respect to citizenship is: Citizenship You must be a Singapore Citizen This holds true for all the categories, you can check this by clicking through the categories on the left hand menu on the website. Note that even for resale flats there is a restriction: From 27 August 2013, ...


5

The situation will probably largely depend on your location. In large cities (such as Berlin or Munich) it will probably be more difficult to find a place than elsewhere. That said, it shouldn't be completely impossible to find at least a temporary accommodation on the internet. One will of course have to be careful to avoid all shady companies but that ...


5

I would recommend going on Craiglist and visiting apartments, that's how most people do it. The thing is, in bug cities like NY and SF, apartments are gone really quickly, so be sure to be ready to be able to pay on the spot. Also a lot of landlords will ask for cash and a month or two for the deposit. So that can easily be $1500-2000 in cash. But yes, I ...


5

Unfortunately, renting in the US is quite difficult without a number of prerequisites. Generally, you should be prepared to have the following things to have the best chance of leasing in the US as a non-citizen student: A copy of your passport for identification purposes. A copy of your I-20, IAP-66, or student visa. A guarantor, someone who is willing to ...


5

As a prospective tenant, the landlord is expecting you to obtain a credit report, through the German credit bureau, SCHUFA.


5

Let's start with the "bad experiences" part of your question: This might be trivial for some, but: Never ever pay any money before you've physically seen the apartment. There are quite a few rent scammers who will give you all sorts of excuses for why you need to pay before you've seen the place - don't be fooled. Now for some meta-advice: Ask a Dutch ...


4

Get a US bank account so you can make payments from it. Second, to avoid the complication of no credit or banking history, offer to pay six months' rent in cash in advance. You will also have to pay a security deposit. Many landlords will accept this. If you can pay the whole year in advance, they definitely will. In many places, paying for the whole year ...


4

Finding long-term accommodation is best if searching is done through informal channels. It really depends on where you will be working. The problem is that you'll need a social network first and you'll typically will develop that once arriving in France. The already mention air-bnb is a good source for the first week. Try to negotiate a better fee, since ...


4

The lowest legal housing I've seen for individual rent was 3000AED, which are individual semi-temporary structures on Sadiyaat Island in Abu Dhabi. But if you are willing to share accommodation, you will very likely find much nicer for the same amount. I have a friend with the exact same salary as you're describing, and she does quite well for herself. ...


4

Paperwork and deposits for apartments are reasonably similar to what's required in the US though the standards seem to favor renters. I don't know if it's more or less similar in other European countries (or elsewhere). Citizenship is not required. Of course, there may be some racial discrimination in practice but it's possible to file a complaint. For ...


4

This article about such a project in Cologne calls it "Wohnen für Hilfe". wohnenfuerhilfe.info lists similar projects in other cities and there is even a site linking similar “homeshare” initiatives in other countries. There are no details about any contract but apparently it's not a private initiative or a one-to-one agreement but typically something ...


4

I'd second AirBnB as an option - it will allow you to use the time to scout out areas and look around before settling for something a bit bigger. Alternatively, websites such as spareroom.co.uk are listings of home owners letting out rooms in their houses - usually for longer term (3-6m), but there may be some offering shorter lets (or others that if you ...


4

wg-gesucht.de is actually one of the standard websites when you're looking for a shared apartment in Germany. Generally speaking, the term you'd be searching for is WG (short for Wohngemeinschaft). This way, you'll find a few more like wg-suche.de, wohngemeinschaft.de, easywg.de etc. You can also try a few general real estate websites like ...


4

One thing to be aware of is that there are two main legal frameworks for long term rental in France : 'meublé' (furnished) or 'vide' (empty). A 'meublé' will include all furniture (bed, chairs, table, maybe tv set, ...,) whereas a 'vide' rental might include some kitchen stuff (oven, fridge, ...) but no other furniture. Some clues here on 'meublé' vs 'vide'....


4

This means the rental is potentially legit. Some people illegally sublet apartments, which means the intermediate remains registered at the address and will not permit the tenant to register. If the tenant registers anyway, the authorities will realise a “collision” at the address and you will both run into trouble. Subletting is a bad idea for many ...


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