13

Yes, you are French, and the reason is your dad was French the day you were born (at least it seems very likely it was the case). As you are French, you can request a passport or national ID from your city. You will have to prove you are French by showing a birth certificate and a proof your dad was French at that time.


9

If we were to be married in New Zealand (a country that allows same sex marriage) can we then migrate to London where he would be able to live and work as my spouse? Yes. There are a number of issues here, and it's hard to know which you're asking about, so I will touch on a few of them. First, as you may know, the complicated history between Great ...


7

What they say seems correct. You are a "British citizen by descent", because you were automatically a British citizen at birth due to being born outside the UK to a parent who was a British citizen otherwise than by descent. It doesn't matter what they did or did not do after your birth; you are still a British citizen by descent. You cannot "upgrade" ...


7

It does not matter where the wedding is actually performed. Both the US and Australia (like virtually all countries) recognise marriages that have been legally performed according to the laws of the country where the wedding took place. If they get married in the US, then after getting married, your son's wife would apply for one of the Australian Partner ...


6

Your parner with the Romanian passport can legally work in all EU countries since January 2014. If you can also be considered as a family member, then you will also have the same rights as her, and be able to work in the same country as she does. The tricky part is whether you can be considered as a family member or not. If you'd be married then it's easy: ...


6

Many of the major urban areas in North America have "British Shops", there's a whole lot of them in Southern California especially. One example (that I haven't been to) in New York is Myers of Keswick (just north of the West Village, it appears). They currently show Vegemite 220g for $10. See Yelp reviews. These stores don't have the volume of Tescos, ...


5

You cannot obtain a regular long-stay visa from within France but you don't necessarily need to go back to Australia to transition to a long-term status. There are at least two solutions you could explore: Applying for a French visa from another European country. Channel hopping at the end of the procedure is not enough, you need to be a resident/have some ...


5

If you live in France (and either staying there for most of the year or having your main abode there would mean that you are considered a resident for tax purpose) then you most likely have to declare and pay taxes there (that's the general rule but you would also need to check whether there is a tax treaty between Australia and France). You do in any case ...


5

You can marry legally in the US regardless of your immigration status. The K-1 visa is for those who intend to settle in the US. Since your fiance will not be adjusting immigration status, and will be leaving the country before the expiration of the allowed period of stay, you will have no problems. Your fiance does not need a K-1 visa. There's not much ...


5

Most things that you cannot find in the local supermarket, and you're unlikely to find it in any local supermarket, may be possible to find on Amazon as long as it is not perishable. In this particular case: 400g Jar of Vegemite Sold by Cooking Marvelous based in the UK and shipped via Snail Mail to you. :) But if you search further: World Market Simply ...


5

Vegemite can be found in most UK supermarkets. It can also be purchased online in the UK from MySupermarket, among others. It's well known enough in the UK to warrant an article on the spread of vegemite in the BBC. In London, the Aussie/NZ/Saffa store in Covent Garden used to sell it - presume they still do (this was only a few years back), albeit with a ...


5

Based on this site you are French if one of your parent on your birth certificate is French when you were born one of your parent on your birth certificate becomes French while you are still a minor and unmarried (for example they get their citizenship later by naturalization). In this case you have to be a resident in France to get your parent's ...


4

You'll have to talk to a US-licensed EA/CPA working with expats in Australia for more authoritative answer. My understanding is that you calculate your Australian taxes and income per calendar year (prorate if no other way is possible), and that is what you report on your US tax forms. So for the foreign earned income exclusion you use your income from ...


4

First, in France, you have to be married to ask for a spouse visa (or about to get married). Then, the process could be long and painful. My first advice would be to ask/print for all official papers (in Australia, like birth certificate, etc.). Then contact an attorney in France which will handle the paperwork for you if you are already in France. The ...


4

You cannot work until you have your visa. You were wise to research this.


4

I Googled it for you and came on these two great government websites: https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/about-visa/australian-resident-visa and https://www.employment.govt.nz/starting-employment/right-to-work-in-new-zealand/ From the image I took a screenshot below, you basically just need to rock up at NZ immigration with ...


4

No, there isn't. The US and Australia do not have a working holiday visa arrangement, and the VWP explicitly does not permit work. The closest option would be the E-3 visa, but this is similar to the H-1B visa (minus the tight quotas) and requires a sponsoring employer in the United States that the visa is tied to, so it's not really practical for ...


4

There are J-1 "exchange visitor" programs that are used for seasonal workers. These require a sponsor who will employ you; before and after the program you have a 30-day "grace period" during which you can travel around the US. Some sponsors have made the news for keeping their employees in rather exploitative conditions, but others are legitimate. I ...


3

Has anyone had similar experience and is this the correct treatment? I have been unable to find any solid tax ruling on this. Its being included on Form 8949 of the IRS return. I don't think this is correct treatment. You should get a statement from the bank servicing your loan as to how much interest you paid during the year, and you get to deduct that ...


3

I have dual citizenship, and when I was going through immigration after arriving in Australia, I handed over my shiny new Canadian passport and was told that they couldn't let me in "with this" - so I handed over my Aussie one and it was all fine. I was travelling on a one-way ticket and I'm pretty sure that was why. If you're travelling on a return ticket ...


3

I just attended the ceremony not long ago and will be leaving for overseas tomorrow. I did not apply for an Australian passport for various reasons. All I can tell is when I checked online using VEVO, about 2 weeks after my citizenship ceremony, my Australia PR visa got cancelled and is showing visa class: null; visa type: permanent resident/citizen. I will ...


3

The recommendation for dual nationals (of any nationalities) is that you enter/leave each country for which you have citizenship using a passport for that country. If you have Australian/Canadian citizenship, that means that if you are flying from Canada to Australia you use your Australian passport to check in to your flight, then you leave Canada using ...


3

Aside from the resident visa (essentially automatic for Australian citizens as detailed in another answer), you will also need an IRD number to actually start working. You can apply for this online after you arrive in NZ and you will just need your Australian passport details. Depending on the nature of your employment, you may also need a local bank ...


3

In principle, this may be possible, with caveats. From Egyptian nationality law: Therefore, even if the child [born abroad] is registered with the Egyptian authorities and given an Egyptian birth certificate (proof of Egyptian citizenship), it is unclear whether Egypt would recognize the foreign citizenship at all in official contexts. From Australian ...


2

I recently had the chance to test this out first hand, since I entirely forgot to get one of the kids their shiny new Aussie passport (oops) and only realized this the day before our flight (double oops). So here's the deal, straight from a grandmotherly exit immigration officer and subsequently validated in practice: As of April 2015, the Immigration and ...


2

This is not exactly the same situation as my children are Australian Nationals by birth and US Citizens by descent but the scenario may apply. I wanted to save money and only have the Australian passports for them. But I was urged to have both. It was suggested that there would be questions asked in the USA why I was entering with my US Passport and my ...


2

My mother is born in 1953 in a British Army hospital in West Germany. Her father was serving in the British Army as a dual Australian and British national. Several years later they returned to Australia. My mother has lived in Australia almost continuously since 1957 but never received an Australian passport until recently. Previously when she travelled ...


2

Sharing my answer from where this was asked on Travel.SE Brilliantly, they're not clear on the embassy website for Aussies in Canada. However, after some searching it comes down to two options. The express service - priority processing fee applies, means that your urgent/emergency application can be processed and ready for collection or dispatch within 48 ...


2

I was in a similar situation as yourself; wanting to move to Switzerland to be with partner and had a bachelors. Have you considered applying for a Masters? Tuition at major universities is around CHF 1000/semester, with programs lasting 2-4 semesters. If you apply and are accepted to Uni, then you can use this to get a 'Student B Permit,' allowing you to ...


2

Formally, there are two ways to qualify for residency in another EU country: as an economically active person and as an economically non-active person. The difference is that an “economically non-active person” must prove that she has sufficient resources and health insurance not to become a burden for the social safety net in her country of residence. You ...


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