We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.
14

If you're not certain whether to mention something, you should mention it. It's not like they don't know about it; they will have it in their records. If you don't mention it, you will appear deceptive, which will work against you. In fact, if you seem deceptive, your application will probably fail for that reason alone. So you should mention it along ...


12

It is possible, but you will need permission. You can freely change jobs on a Blue Card if you have already been in the country for two years. Prior to this two year period, you will need to gain permission from the authorities. If you are in Berlin, you can follow this information on how to get permission to change employers.


8

OK, I wasn't able to find an answer to my question through my own research, so I sought out 2 different lawyers and paid each of them about 100 EUR for a consultation (which amounted to an hour in an office reviewing my case and answering any of my specific questions). The price worth it to me for peace of mind and a thorough understanding of my options. ...


7

After 5 years, you will become a “long-term resident” under EU law but it does not make all that much of a difference. After 5 years, you can also apply for a Niederlassungserlaubnis but there are a number of conditions to meet, most importantly: Having contributed to the social security system for 60 months Knowing (some) German Having a job, sufficient ...


7

If one wants to have a residence permit for the purpose of employment (if this is your main purpose of getting the residence permit) in Germany, it could be issued based on 2 paragraphs of the "residence law" (Act on the Residence, Economic Activity and Integration of Foreigners in the Federal Territory, or Aufenthaltsgesetz, please see Act in English or ...


7

Your degree Tecnólogo em Análise e Desenvolvimento de Sistemas listed in the Anabin database, which is used to compare foreign degrees to German ones. This database is checked by immigration officers when you apply for a blue card. For your degree it lists the equivalence class Bedingt vergleichbar: Bakkalaureus/Bachelor 3j which means it's only ...


6

A university degree is pretty much required. Formally, what's required by the relevant EU directive are “higher professional qualifications” defined as ‘higher professional qualifications’ means qualifications attested by evidence of higher education qualifications or, by way of derogation, when provided for by national law, attested by at least five ...


6

Yes A blue card allows for your spouse and relatives to accompany you. A "spouse" always means "spouse or registered partner", which is Germany's way of saying "It's a same sex marriage, but it doesn't have 100% the same rights as a married couple, so we don't call it marriage". Registered Partnership has existed for a while. Same sex marriage actually ...


5

Since I have come back from German Embassy and no one else has posted an answer yet, I would try to summarize my findings in case it helps someone. So basically German Embassy needs the equivalence certificate from ZAB even if one's degree is listed as 'Entspricht' on Anabin database. This may be true for only a selected set of Embassies but for the ...


5

There are three "equivalence categories" in the anabin database: Bedingt vergleichbar, Entspricht, and Gleichwertig. Based on your comments, the entry for your diploma mentions a German 3-year bachelor degree with the category "Entspricht". This is how the official website describes this category: "Entspricht" ist eine neutrale Einstufung, die aussagt, ...


5

I'm afraid the only valid answer is to see your Ausländerbehörde and ask them. From my experience, they will accept all kinds of certificates, because they will run their own simple test even if you have a certificate. To quote them: "Yes, well, certificates can be bought." Your best bet is to go ask them, and then don't focus too much on the certificate, ...


5

If you are close to two years with a BlueCard and you also know German language, you can apply for permanent residence permit already (after 21 months with BlueCard), which will allow you to register a company in Germany. Next, even without a permanent residence permit, it is also possible that you just go to Ausländerbehörde and ask them for separate ...


5

Due to the complexity of this single topic, I will sub-devide the answer in the (hopefully) correct order. Foreigners office (Ausländerbehörde) : Aufenthaltsgesetz (2018) §51(7) Regulates what happens if you leave the country for a long period of time longer than 6 months a longer period than agreed with the Ausländerbehörde the granted leave (...


4

It depends where you live actually. But pretty much this link can be useful somehow: https://service.berlin.de/dienstleistung/326856/en/


4

Just to reinforce what the others said. Me and my wife are from Brazil, and we live in Luxembourg. I had to apply to blue card. However, I have a co-worker from Brazil who came in the same situation as yours. His wife is from Portugal. He didn't need to apply for a blue card, as he is considered member of a european family and can work regularly. She doesn'...


4

No, you cannot. Both the EU directive and German law include a provision to allow the authorities to exempt applicants from the education requirement based on their professional experience but the relevant federal ministry in Germany hasn't enacted the regulation (Verordnung) that would be necessary to implement it so that it remains impossible for the ...


4

In general, you can renew your passport before it expires if you have the right documents. Do that in your embassy in Germany. Tell your local Auslaenderbehoerde that you are going to do that. Your old passport will still be valid until it's date is past, unless they invalidate it (i.e. they make holes in it). In any case, tell your embassy you want to keep ...


4

EU Blue Card: Live & Work in Europe explains how and what to do If You Have Found a Job in Germany. If you have already found a job – either while in your home country or while in Germany, then the following are the documents you need when applying: For unregulated professions – a recognized university diploma, In case of regulated ...


4

Generally speaking, a promotion and a salary increase are extensions to your contract that must be accepted by both parties in writing. This is no big deal normally, both sign the extra page, the employee walks out of the office happy. As you did not agree, there was no promotion and no salary increase. Legally, it's not rolled back, because legally, you ...


4

Generally speaking, permanent residence is only valid for duration of your continued residence in the country in question. If you were to resettle abroad, you would lose your permanent residence after a period of time. Depending on the country, there are likely to be some exceptions, such as working abroad for a company headquartered back home, government ...


4

TL;DR: What ZAB is answering you is that given their initial screening of documents they will most likely not consider your degree equivalent to a German university degree. That is also why they are asking you whether you really want to proceed with the process, given that the outcome would most likely be unfavorable to you. Google translate is unable to ...


4

First of all, I would for sure not quit your job unless you are sure you will receive the resident permit for self-employed work. Expect it to be a long process, depending on what kind of residence permit you have currently. Also be prepared to deal with one specific problem: German law knows the co-called "Freie Berufe" (which is meant by "liberal ...


4

I managed to figure this out after a couple of emails to the German consulate. The answer is: No, we can't apply for a Blue card directly; but once we have a German national visa, and we travel to Germany, only then can we apply for a blue card.


4

If you rely on your savings solely, it's six months. The blue card is connected to having a job, whether there is an employer given already or not – if you have no employer noted on the card, it just means you start with the three/six-month grant. After becoming jobless, you again have three/six month looking for a job. With a new job offer you have to ...


3

The Czech Ministry of the Interior gives the following definition for the Blue Card (Modrá karta): An EU Blue Card is a new residential status designed for a long-term stay involving the performance of a highly skilled job (§ 42i of the Act on the Residence of Foreign Nationals). An EU Blue Card entitles a foreign national to stay and perform a job, ...


3

Those are two distinct issues: The possibility to get a Blue Card based solely on professional experience (without a recognised degree) is optional as far as EU law is concerned. Germany does not have to do it and, in spite of the provision in the statute, hasn't enacted the necessary Rechtsverordnung. This has been going on for years now and it could go on ...


3

In the EU, you should by default get a license from the country you live in. EU countries are not supposed to let you pass the exam or to issue a license if you are not a resident. Conversely, if you lose your license, it gets stolen or expires, you should apply for a replacement to the authorities of the country where you live, and not from the country ...


3

Check out Carrying out an ancillary activity as a third-country national family member of a third-country national: Third-country nationals holding a residence permit for family members, who wish to carry out a salaried activity on an ancillary basis must apply for a work permit before starting work. Additionally, from the same page: Family members ...


3

You will have to stay and work in Germany for atleast 18 months after the date you received your Blue Card before you can live and work in any other EU country. You won't need a visa as long as the Blue Card is still valid. But you won't be able to stay in any other EU country until 1.10.2016.


3

The Blue Card scheme is (deliberately) separate from national visas. There are no provisions to recognize previous stays or grant rights to some category of residents (even highly skilled migrants), you need to apply for it specifically. There is a directive granting permanent residency rights to non-EU citizens who resided for some time under another ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible