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10

TL;DR The UK will most likely remain a member of the EU until at least 2018, potentially leaving the bloc 29 March 2019 11pm UK time. All of the current EU/EEA laws still apply until that date. No one really knows what will happen afterwards. The government has set up a newsletter for EU citizens living in the UK, which you can join to get updates, ...


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Summary Currently there are no real negatives to gaining Irish Citizenship, other than: The cost and hassle of registration on the foreign births register. The Cost of your first passport. Renewal fees for your passport renewals on expiry every 10 years. Background According to The Wikipedia article on The Irish Diaspora there are about 3 million people ...


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Until we know more of the new laws and regulations there is at the moment one and only one sure way of an EU citizen to remain in the UK after Brexit, which is naturalising as a citizen. For this they need to live in the UK lawfully for 6 years (5 years to obtain Permanent Residence, and one more year in PR status to be eligible for naturalisation). ...


4

Although the UK referendum is on the 23rd of June, nothing will change immediately regardless of the outcome to vote. If the result is to remain, nothing will radically change any time soon. If the result is to leave: In the short term, nothing will radically change. It will take years to negotiate the new status. The Leave campaign has not provided a ...


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Deloitte's a guide to Brexit gives a good overview, which echoes SztupY's answer:


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Yes. The advice from UK government is that holders of UK driving licenses who live in Germany should exchange their driving licenses before 29th March https://www.gov.uk/guidance/living-in-germany#driving-in-germany Linked from there is advice from the German government: https://www.bmvi.de/SharedDocs/EN/Documents/LA/fact-sheet-foreign-driving-licences....


3

Given the current state of affairs, your wife's status -- and yours -- will depend on when the UK leaves the EU, and whether it has done so with a "deal," that is, with a withdrawal agreement in place. If there is such an agreement, the deadline for moving to the UK is expected to be the the end of 2020. If the UK is still in the EU when you arrive there, ...


3

As of today, you are the spouse of an EU citizen and are living in a second EU country. Therefore, under the free movement rules, you have the right to work. All you should need to prove this is your marriage certificate (to prove you are married) and your spouse's passport (to prove their citizenship). Of course, whether an employer will accept just ...


3

The official joint report from the negotiations released on Friday states in relevant part (emphasis in original): The overall objective of the Withdrawal Agreement with respect to citizens' rights is to provide reciprocal protection for Union and UK citizens, to enable the effective exercise of rights derived from Union law and based on past life ...


3

(Answer up-to-date as of 2017-03-22) If I understand correctly, EU citizens can move to the UK under the current laws Correct. and they will get same status after the Brexit. Wrong. The post-Brexit status of current or future EU citizens in the UK is currently unknown. Analists consider it likely that their status will eventually be guaranteed, ...


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TL;DR The UK will most likely remain a member of the EU until at least 2018. All of the current EU/EEA laws still apply until that date. No one knows what will happen afterwards. Long answer Although the referendum is passed, nothing much will change overnight. As of 24/06/2016 the current plan is to invoke Article 50 around October 2016. Invoking this ...


3

During the transition period, free movement continues to be in effect in the UK. EU citizens and nationals of Switzerland and EEA countries can settle in the UK as before. After the end of the transition period, whose who arrived before the end of the transition period can remain under the settlement agreement scheme. For those who arrive after the end of ...


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The UK is still in the European Union, and will continue being so for at least the next 2 years. No rules have changed today.


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As the negotiations progress, we still unfortunately lack clarity from the UK government. However, as people cannot simply wait and see we are forced to speculate based on available information and statements by those involved. One important thing to remember is that freedom of movement is not derived from the EU, it's actually part of the European Economic ...


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Brexit and EEA Dependants: what to do The "canonical" recommended steps to take beforehand are... Those EEA citizens or their family members in the UK who does not have an EU/EEA permanent residence card for the UK should consider now whether to apply (or timetable for when they can apply) and should do so unless there is clear harm in doing so. If they ...


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There is no visa required at this time. Brexit has not occurred yet.


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In short: if you can you should apply for a PR soon, and convert it to a settled status once it's available. However it's possible that you'll need the support of your partner both times. Based on the current details on how the settled status will work, it will be easier to obtain that than the Permanent Residence document, and will also be valid after 31 ...


2

Will that child bei able to claim both the UK and the bulgarian (thus EU) citizenship? Bulgarian nationality law provides that the child of a Bulgarian citizen is also a Bulgarian citizen regardless of the place of birth, so the only question is whether the child will have UK citizenship. Your child will have UK citizenship if the child is born in the UK ...


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I've found a document from the Children's Commissioner for England that implies that the requirement stated in my earlier comment is outdated. The comment (in case it is deleted) was: Good question. I believe your permanent residence dates not from 2013 but 2012 (five years after you arrived). At Apply for citizenship if you were born in the UK, however, ...


2

Now, the UK is still in the EU, so it works just as it has for the last 15 years or so, or at least it is supposed to. To preserve the rights of EU citizens after the UK leaves the EU, they have devised the EU settlement scheme. This should take care of most of your concerns: If you’re an EU, EEA or Swiss citizen, you and your family can apply to the EU ...


2

There would be no problem with being self employed once you have the right to work in the UK. Most likely you would get a family visa, unless you have the means to obtain an investor visa. You tagged the question with brexit but that won't affect you directly unless you're an EU national (edit: or you are living in another EU country with your spouse now)(I ...


2

I do something very similar. I live in Germany and work in Switzerland (I stay in Switzerland during the week). I am classified in German as a Grenzgänger which is sometimes translated into English as "cross-border commuter" (it is not a term that is often needed in the UK of course). It is quite common in Europe (I have a Dutch friend whose sister does ...


2

Resident permits and corresponding work permits are based on national laws. So for 3rd country nationals, assume that persons living/working in both Belgium and the Netherlands must deal with both countries. The best advice that can be given, is to go and ask them if a 'practical solution' exists for this scenario (one never knows...) especially for ...


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No realistic answer can be given to this question due to the amount of unknown factors at present. Until the legislation passed in known after a Scottish independence, one could only speculate. So any speculation now, would not result in an answer that one could rely on.


1

Settled status or no, as things stand at the moment you will be able to freely move to the UK as an EU national in mid 2020. Unless there's a major upheaval (and hey, who knows!) all of 2020 will be the "transition period"link and you will still be able to move to the UK without a visa and UK citizens will still have the ability to do the same to the rest of ...


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Inspired by Patricia Sanahan's comment, the easiest and most straightforward way to both verify and prove your citizenship would be to apply for a British passport. If they grant it, you have the ultimate documental proof. If they reject it, they will tell you why. Edit after MJeffryes' comment: Turns out that it may not be that ultimate after all, the UK'...


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EEA nationals and their family members who travel to the UK and take up residence before the end of the transition period will be allowed to remain with “pre-settled status”. If they then stay for a continuous period of five years, they will become eligible for permanent residence (settled status under the new provisions). An EEA citizen continuously ...


1

If I understand correctly, your Aufenthaltserlaubnis falls outside of EU free movement law. This should mean that the status it confers does not depend on the outcome of the Brexit process. In addition to that, you are currently entitled to a right of permanent residence under EU law, and that may change as a result of Brexit. But since this status is ...


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Sadly, nobody knows yet. Because Brexit has not yet happened, and the terms of the break with the EU have not yet been negotiated, there are a great many questions like this that have to go unanswered. All anyone can say is to wait and see.


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News today was that the UK has agreed to pay major amounts of money to the EU, and has agreed to keep the border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland open. That's two out of three, rights for EU citizens in the UK is the third one. The position of the UK government so far can be characterized by utter cluelessness. There was some stuff ...


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