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10

Canada's Citizenship Act says 3 (1) Subject to this Act, a person is a citizen if (a) the person was born in Canada after February 14, 1977; So yes, the child will be a Canadian citizen from the moment of his or her birth.


9

You probably are a Canadian citizen, in which case, yes. The page on citizenship rules suggests that you have been a Canadian citizen from birth because your father is a Canadian citizen born in Canada. Some countries will adjudicate your claim to citizenship as part of an initial passport application, but Canada seems to want you to apply for a ...


9

The big problem that I see with this arrangement is that the UK considers it work -- and it is; you will literally be working for compensation -- and will not allow you to enter for that purpose without a work visa.


7

So what you really want to know is, are you a Canadian citizen. If you were born after April 17, 2009: You are a Canadian citizen. The original Bill C-37 that took effect in 2009 which limits Canadian citizenship by descent to the first generation born abroad would not have given citizenship to you, because you dad was born abroad. There was an exception ...


7

Not really. The process is mostly the same. A Canadian citizen would still need an H-1B or L-1 petition filed by the employer and approved by USCIS, just like someone from any other country, including being subject to the H-1B cap, etc. The only difference is that Canadian citizens do not need to get a US visa. They can simply travel to the US on their ...


6

Simply put, if you're ineligible for any ancestral visa, the quickest way would be to marry a British Citizen. That way you are eligible for ILR after 2 years, and citizenship just one year later. The other option is the Tier 1 Entrepreneur visa, but you need at least £50k, and you can only work for yourself (details here: https://www.gov.uk/tier-1-...


6

Your understanding is incorrect. To legally work in the US you need a proper immigration status. If you don't have a US citizenship or permanent resident status (green card) - you need an immigration status that allows free employment. Since you're working for a Canadian employer, located in Canada - you won't be able to get neither H1b nor TN. You'll need ...


6

Visas are the employer's job. It is for the employer and its lawyers to deal with, and give you instructions on what to do. Technology is definitely covered under NAFTA, but I don't know if internships are. Generally, internships are done under J1 or H3 visa. TN is for professionals, and since you don't have the degree yet you may not qualify (or maybe yes, ...


6

Canada has unrestricted Jus Soli, and thus any child born in Canada is automatcally a citizen by birth. This is irrespective the parent's immigration status or nationalities.


6

The child is eligible for Overseas Citizenship of India (OCI). This will allow the child to live in India without being subject to foreigner registration.


5

Given that you are a student I would suggest looking for an Exchange Program and a J1 visa. To obtain a TN visa you need to be a professional with a degree according to the published list. But in either case your employer will be getting you a visa if they decide to hire you even temporarily.


5

No, you're not yet authorized to work in the United States. You could include information about a TN visa in your cover letter. You are correct that you can apply for the visa at the border directly with a letter from your (prospective) employer. The employer alternatively could file form I-129. Then you would present the approved form at the border ...


5

The Canadian government webpage on this is quite clear. Your child, born outside Canada after April 17, 2009, is a Canadian citizen because you were born in Canada. If I either ask them again what the status is, or if I wait until I get a negative reply and retry to get his proof of citizenship done, I fear I will hinder his chances to ever get the proof ...


4

The term used by the US is change of status (when changing to immigrant status, the term is adjustment of status.) The form for changing from one non-immigrant status to another is the I-539. However, you will not file I-539, because, in that form's instructions, you will find this: An employer must file Form I-129 on behalf of a TN professional worker ...


4

I don't know of any country having a numerical limit on how many citizenships their citizens may have: either they allow multiple citizenships or they don't. France allows it by not disallowing it in law, but it is also explicitly stated in various governmental sources that multiple citizenships are allowed. For example, on the Foreign Ministry's website: ...


4

If you are interested in preparing an equivalence of your degree, you should get in touch with the Zentralstelle für ausländisches Bildungswesen (ZAB) which is the administration responsible for evaluating degrees earned in foreign countries: Die Zentralstelle für ausländisches Bildungswesen (ZAB) ist die zentrale Stelle für die Bewertung ausländischer ...


4

You will need to obtain a temporary worker visa in order to legally work in the US. As a Canadian citizen you may be eligible for TN Visa which has an initial period of stay of 3 years. The requirements for application you can take look at the CBP's site. Good news is that there doesn't seem to be a quota on the TN visa applicants. You can also apply for ...


4

There are many possible visas that she may be eligible for: Work Visas, Exchange visitor Visas, NAFTA Visa, Student Visas But in all of these cases you will need to find employment/sponsor program/college program that will accept her in the US and if necessary submit paperwork to USCIS. As far as H-1B is concerned there are yearly quotas so I would suggest ...


4

The 2-year requirement in INA 212(e) only applies to immigrant visas and H and L nonimmigrant visas. It does not apply to TN and TD. The Foreign Affairs Manual explicitly confirms this for TN/TD in 9 FAM 402.17-11.


4

If a person has dual citizenship (Canada and US), what will the foreign national potential spouse (from Europe) have to go through in order to be legally residing in the US? The process is the same as for the spouse of any US citizen. The fact that the US citizen holds another nationality is not relevant. There are three possibilities, depending on where ...


4

I'm not a lawyer and none of this is legal advice. Your current plan sounds like a very bad idea if you want to get your Green Card quickly. But before we dissect that lets cover the main question that you have about the retention of your priority date. If your I-140 has been approved for more than 180 days then your employer can no longer revoke their ...


3

You should try to contact the Nova Scotia immigration office to confirm. Based on the paragraph that you included above (and I've looked at the originating website, you don't have to also apply directly with NSOI if you've already applied for the Federal Express Entry and included that you'd like to emigrate to Nova Scotia. NSOI is able to search the ...


3

Is there any way to inexpensively get a visa to work in the US for 4 months as a Canadian? In short, no. Typically, if you opted into a co-op program with a university like UWaterloo, you would be paying (EDIT:) fees to [UWaterloo] (typically in the order of $700 per academic term) to coordinate your J-1 Visa with their sponsor, Cultural Vistas (who handles ...


3

I don't think the field is regulated. The page from the German Foreign Office is about requirements to obtain a regular work visa, and not about the general restrictions that apply to Germans and EU citizens alike. Access to the German job market is easier for people working in IT to the extent that they can qualify for an EU blue card with a lower salary. ...


3

Just to answer for myself, I have already moved to Osaka, Japan for almost one year. Like Kent said, when I arrived to Osaka, I could enroll in the National Health Insurance Plan (国民健康保険). The Working Holiday period given to me was 6 months (I could extends to 1 year after arrived for 3, 4 months... forgot how many months exactly). But either way, I don't ...


3

The recommendation for dual nationals (of any nationalities) is that you enter/leave each country for which you have citizenship using a passport for that country. If you have Australian/Canadian citizenship, that means that if you are flying from Canada to Australia you use your Australian passport to check in to your flight, then you leave Canada using ...


3

I think you want: Reason for visit: settlement Visa type: settlement Visa subtype: wife or husband, as appropriate


3

Customs and Border Protection has the same address on their site, so it seems that the address is still correct. However, since the US recorded your departure you can be unconcerned about sending in the form. Its only purpose of to record your exit, and that already happened. But if you're prone to worry, there's no harm in sending it in, either.


2

All the restrictions I am aware of are explicitly about work (Erwerbstätigkeit) and there are distinct visas to look for jobs that do not allow working so it would seem to imply that “looking for a job” is a distinct category and therefore OK to do as a visitor (being an EU citizen, I don't need a visa and I have no first-hand experience with that so this is ...


2

I don't think it's too difficult to get a an IT job in Germany, or elsewhere in Europe, as long as you have experience in a platform or technology that's in high demand. I'm an American who's lived in Germany for 12 years. The first 9 years I worked for American IT companies (EDS, then HP), but when my company's contract ran out, I just moved to a German ...


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