9

From verkehrsportal.de/: § 20 Abs. 1 Satz 1 FZV: In einem anderen Mitgliedstaat der Europäischen Union oder einem anderen Vertragsstaat des Abkommens über den Europäischen Wirtschaftsraum zugelassene Fahrzeuge dürfen vorübergehend am Verkehr im Inland teilnehmen, wenn für sie von einer zuständigen Stelle des anderen Mitgliedstaates oder des ...


8

Insurance companies can decide what to penalise or not. The best way to figure out what your quote would be whether you have a full UK or just a full EEA licence is to get a quote for both of them and compare the prices. As I had the same question in mind as well I did check a few (usually cheap) insurance companies about their price by checking how much it ...


7

To show you have obligatory car insurance all you need to is the green card and a european accident form. So if you are able to find a insurer willing to issue you such a green card you are set to go. Having said that, I doubt such a company exists. When I moved country I remained insured with my previous travel insurance. Years later they fully reimbursed ...


6

Yes, it's possible since I have done it… but I am not sure if there is any specific EU-wide rule or standard document for that and I am not able to provide anything more than an anecdote. IIRC, I phoned my soon-to-be insurer (in the Netherlands) to ask if they would consider it and then sent some document provided by my previous insurer (not even sure if it ...


6

My experience in Germany was different then @Dirty-flow answer: I lived in Germany for about 1 year and I drove a car registered in Romania, with Romanian plates and Romanian insurance and green card. As I knew I can drive up to 6 months, I went to the local Police to ask about my legal options to drive the car, and they told me I do not have to register ...


5

I've done it both from the UK to Germany, and from Germany to the UK. Which was a bit complicated because no-claims bonus is calculated differently in both countries. I don't remember the details of how it worked, but two insurance companies supplied me with the details that were accepted in the other country.


5

Once you have your "carte grise" and your physical numberplate on the car, it's all good for you. You have nothing to pay annually except your car insurance of course Road tax has been abolished in France in 2001.


5

If you have a conviction in the last five years, you should answer "yes" regardless of whether the points are visible on your UK driving record. Otherwise, you run the risk of being denied coverage. Consider that the question is about whether you've been convicted, not about whether you have points. If you claim not to have been convicted, you can expect ...


5

Yes, you need insurance, and to pay road tax. They are not included in the cost of petrol or similar. You will need to budget for the following items in purchasing a car: Insurance. It's a legal requirement that you have insurance for your car. https://www.gov.uk/vehicle-insurance/driving-without-insurance has details. Vehicle Excise Duty (VED) for the car ...


4

Yes, you need to have your car both taxed, and you need at least a valid third-party car insurance. Third-party insurance means that in case of an accident that was done by you, the damage you've done will be dealt by the insurance company, but the damage to your car will not. Third party insurance doesn't cover anything if your car is stolen, or damaged by ...


4

The form @Nostradamnit refers to is called the European Accident Statement. You can download it in various languages from this site, and usually you can also ask for a copy from your insurance company. It is worth having at least one copy in your car all the time. The cover page (rotated 90 degrees, so it might be a bit hard to read) contains all of the ...


4

In France, it is possible for tourists to lease a "transit temporaire" vehicle. This is a scheme whereby a new car for use by non-residents can be registered tax free, and is then rented to for a temporary period, deferring the taxes. At the end of the period, the manufacturer gets the car back, and pays the taxes on the (now depreciated) vehicle. Due to the ...


4

There are two flavours of car insurance in Victoria: Compulsory Third Party (CTP) insurance is mandatory and included with your car registration ("rego"). Prices are fixed, around $750/year all in at time of writing, and everything is handled by VicRoads, the state road agency. If you purchase a used car, it may include some months of prepaid rego and ...


3

An important aspect and benefit of having a UK license in the UK: Should you be caught speeding, and you have a UK license, then you can accept a fixed penalty notice. If you don't have a UK license, you will have to go to court which will be more inconvenient and more expensive.


3

If you are a foreign national who does not live in the Mercosul area (which is your case) and you are going to stay temporarily in Brazil, you can bring your car. But you will have to declare it to the Brazilian Revenue Service under the "special regime for temporary admission". This means that you are declaring to the Brazilian government that your car is ...


3

As already mentioned, yes you do need to have the 'Road Fund Licence' (also known as 'car tax') paid, and you need at least 'third party' insurance, to cover damage you may do to any other vehicles and/or their occupants. As also mentioned, the insurance can be extremely expensive, in some cases costing more than the car itself (especially true if you buy a ...


3

I found a brochure with what to do in this cases issued by the ADAC. I will try to summarise the answers to your questions: Should you call the police: Bei Verletzten, hohem Sachschaden, fehlender Einigung, wenn der Unfallgegner sich unerlaubt von der Unfallstelle entfernt hat oder ein Fahrzeug mit Kennzeichen außerhalb der EU ohne Versicherungsnachweis (...


2

According to California DMV, The following minimum liability insurance is required for private passenger vehicles: $15,000 for injury/death to one person. (Also known as bodily injury liability) $30,000 for injury/death to more than one person. $5,000 for damage to property. (Also known as product damage liability) Third party liability insurance ...


2

It depends on the insurance company, and you may have to try more than one. When you exchange your driving license, th U.K. one will have the date when you received your original license, so a brand new license might have a date of 1999 if that’s when you took your driving test. You need to ask, but it would be unlikely that your insurance premiums go up ...


1

You don't need a UK driving licence to own, tax and insure a car in the UK. I would highly recommend you to insure your car using your newly exchanged EU driving licence for the following reasons: Your insurance company might request a copy of the driving licence you declared on the insurance policy when you make a claim; DVLA might be notified of the ...


1

I did three test drives this weekend, and while answers 1, 2 and 3 stay as answered by Traveller, I would like to add some information to answer 4. Q4 - The big problem with non-UK driving licences is with the dealer's insurance. One dealership accepted my EU licence without a problem. I drove alone due to Covid-19 restrictions and nobody followed me. The ...


1

Q1 I would expect the dealer to provide you with a copy of the loan/demonstration insurance agreement. This will include eg your declaration of eligibility for the insurance such as age, valid (UK) driving licence applicable to the vehicle, penalty points/driving offence convictions etc, and the conditions of the loan eg excess payable in the event of an ...


1

The parts about buying, insurance, and the Vignette sound fine. Nothing important to add here imo. About the check by Öamtc etc.: Not exactly sure about the insurance requirements, but this is strongly recommended anyways - the "Pickerl" checks are not full checks of the car, just some important and/or easily breaking things. Doing it more thorough helps ...


1

Yes, depending on the company. There are several of examples online stating just this. From the last link: Many Australian Insurers will accept your British No Claims Discount, and some do not even need to see it, unless you have a claim. At that point they will need it, and if you don’t have it, then technically they could invalidate your ...


1

You will need to be a resident in Spain, as you will need to provide you foreign resident number alongside your passport. Link to the official documentation at gob.es : https://sede.dgt.gob.es/Galerias/tramites-y-multas/tu-coche/matriculacion/08/08-Matriculacion-ordinaria-vehiculos-INGLES-04-04-2016.pdf


1

I've been in similar situation, I've talked with GEICO and Progressive as suggested in answer to this question: «California car insurance for rental cars?» Unfortunately, what I have learned is that you cannot get their insurance unless you own a car. Once you have insurance for your own car, it does cover rentals to some extent. But it's not possible to ...


1

From the Geico website: If you don't own a car but still need affordable car rental insurance, ask your GEICO representative about a non-owner liability policy and/or personal effects coverage available on your homeowners policy or renters insurance policy. Non-owner liability coverage may provide liability protection when you rent or borrow a car while ...


1

The insurance company is not obliged to accept a foreign no-claims certificate, but they may do so to get your custom. It's more usual for companies that work in both countries. But make sure you get it clear before you commit yourself. Don't believe a verbal assurance that they will refund you money later after they have examined the no-claims certificate. ...


1

What Drivers Should Do Right After an Accident in Germany After most accidents, call the police, especially if people were injured. Exception: With smaller sheet metal damages the police does not necessarily have to be on the spot for accident recording. Make a note of the license plate of the accident opponent. Make a note of the names and addresses of the ...


1

Normally in Europe there is a form that both parties complete and submit the their respective insurance companies, who then sort it out amoungst themselves. That's how it works in France anyway, and the form clearly states that it's for all EU countries. Did you complete some sort of form, or at least get the other person's contact info? Good luck, Sam


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