6

Well, it would actually be good to build a country-by-country list. Let me try to enumerate the high level hot points and I will allow others to help fill these out. Privacy in public. Unlike many many other countries, if a stranger disagrees with what you are doing or has an observation, it is not uncommon for them to speak to you about it. For instance, ...


6

Since the child is born out of wedlock to a U.S. citizen father (you) and an alien mother, the child is automatically a U.S. citizen at birth if: You were physically present in the U.S. (in any status) before the child's birth for 5 years, including 2 years after turning 14 Blood relationship between the child and the father is established by clear and ...


6

We now have the concept of "normally resident" in the UK; a term whose full implications are not intuitive, but it means your permanent "home" is the UK and anywhere else you resided, you always called the UK home. If it sounds vague and nebulous, that's because it is, but thankfully, proving "normal residency" isn't that difficult. I came to know this ...


5

Being born in the UK is generally not enough to satisfy the UK citizenship requirements. From the information you have provided, your son will likely not qualify. You will need to apply for a tier 2 dependent visa for your son. The application will require your son to have a valid passport. My understanding of the UKBA rules are that you do not need to apply ...


5

As far as I'm aware, as long as you are legally staying in the country (semi) permanently and are paying your taxes, you have the same rights as anyone else with regards to childcare. In Germany this should include the right to a subsidised place in a Kindergarten or with other similar care takers like a Tagesmutter (semi-private single person Kindergärten ...


5

In the absence of expanded details asked by @ouflak whether you were married to this individual and whether his name is on the child's birth certificate, you may have the option of requesting a child support order in Cameroon. Understand that the UK courts may not be able to enforce such an order since Cameroon does not participate in what are known as ...


5

You were born in the UK. I assume you you are a British citizen, because you make no mention of your own visa. Because you were born in the UK, you are a British citizen "otherwise than by descent," and your child is therefore also a British citizen (by descent, however). In that case, your child obviously does not need a visa, but it will probably be ...


4

I think your best option is to apply to Arbeitlosengeld 2, a.k.a Hartz IV. Basically you apply for some money that should cover for your living expenses + your daughter + health insurance for the three of you. As far as I know, you can ask for it independently from whether you hold an university degree or not. Nevertheless, I strongly encourage you to find ...


4

According to the one of the references in Wikipedia article you're linking to: Simplest case is that members of the family are Spanish nationals, or EU nationals, or EEA nationals, and they all are Spanish residents. Para poder adquirir la consideración de familia numerosa, sus miembros deberán ser españoles o nacionales de un estado miembro de la ...


4

This seems to be rather difficult and only possible in certain cases. For more information on home schooling in the Netherlands, you should have a look at this article by the Netherlands Home Education Association (all quotes below are from this article). The basic principle is: In principle, every child that resides in The Netherlands is subject to ...


4

If you and the child's other parent cannot agree on maintenance, or if the other parent is recalcitrant, you can submit an application to the UK Child Maintenance Service. This is a publicly funded service available to UK residents. There is also the Child Support Agency which is available for especially difficult cases. They have a cadre of enforcers with ...


4

A child born to a Polish citizen outside of Poland is automatically a Polish citizen. Polish citizenship qualifies the child for a Polish passport. There is no specific EU passport. Each member country's passport is evidence of EU 'citizenship' and all of those rights and responsibilities.


4

Although your little one was born in the UK, she may not be considered a returning resident, was about 2 months old when she left and has been in Pakistan for the last 8 months. Pakistan is among those countries whose visa applicants require TB testing. While you have the correct UK link, Tuberculosis tests for visa applicants, the section following what ...


4

All you need to do is get your child her British passport. Then you should be able to travel with her back to the United Kingdom, no problem. I've heard people say that you might need a letter from the other parent stating that she consents to you traveling alone with the child. I have done this trip both ways traveling alone with a daughter and had no ...


3

Beneath all things you actually can do, which I am sure are restricted, I mean, beneath Internet, Postals and Phone, there is nothing else you can really use to communicate with each other on this distances. I want to empathize here more on another point: I was as child often alone with either my mamma(!) :) or my dad. One of both always was "abroad" ...


3

I have experience as a Skype child: my father left to work abroad at the time when internet was still dial-up, and web cameras just entered the market, so trying these new technologies as a child was quite exciting at that time. I guess this does not apply any more, as tech is already part of a child's life. These are some ideas I would enjoy both as a ...


3

It looks like it is possible that your son can gain British citizenship, but you will have to apply. From Intercountry adoption and British citizenship: an application will normally be approved if each of the following criteria is satisfied: at least one of the adoptive parents is a British citizen otherwise than by descent (i.e. by virtue of his ...


3

The form that seems relevant to your case is here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/application-to-register-child-under-18-as-british-citizen-form-mn1 Unfortunately it is not so clear if you will be successful in your application. But it does appear possible to try. You'd be relying on the discretion of the British Home Secretary because your ...


3

My advice is to work backwards - figure out where you both will ultimately be living, and where you both ultimately want to have residency (or citizenship). Contact the State Dept. or equivalent government entity for that country (and state/province, if known & applicable) and find out what their rules for marriage are. Rules vary widely based on which ...


3

Don't know about Spain and Guatemala specifically but: Rules do vary quite a bit and it does matter in practice. It might be easier to marry in some place than other. For example, some countries have residency requirements (even a requirement that you live in the specific municipality where you want to marry or some such), others do not. The documentation ...


3

I have no direct experience being a Skype parent, but have seen cases where the immigration rules have prevented family reunion. Also, the BBC has run stories about the phenomenon of Skype parenting. It's hard for a 4 year old to get their heads around interacting with someone through Skype. It can be structured as a regular activity, like bedtime so ...


3

Applying for citizenship under the more favourable rules for spouses will not be possible anymore so that would be one major consequence of the death of your husband in this respect. If that's what you want to do, it would make sense to start the application immediately, I don't see any downsides. But of course, the biggest difference between the ...


3

EU (and Swiss, Norwegian or Icelandic) citizens who reside in Germany can get Kindergeld on a par with German citizens. Other people (citizens from third countries living in Germany, people who work in Germany but reside elsewhere) can also be eligible depending on their status and other details. Source: Wikipedia (in German), Merkblatt Kindergeld 2014 from ...


3

The best options we've encountered are truly international schools, where the local emphasis in curriculum is lessened. You can find Americanized schools in various countries, but that's not always going to be possible. International schools tend to focus on world history and International English, instead of mostly local history and local language (which ...


3

In general, except for rare cases, you can only get an SSN when you are authorized to work. People on J-2 (including both spouses and children of the J-1) have the option to apply for EADs (note that it is not cheap; the fee for I-765 is $410), in which case after they get the EADs they would be authorized to work and can get SSNs based on that; but without ...


3

As your father was born outside the UK, once he gets his citizenship he will be a UK citizen by descent. UK citizens by descent generally cannot pass on citizenship to their children who are born outside the UK. There is at least one exception however, in that if the UK citizen by descent lived in the UK for at least a 3 year period, they then can pass on ...


3

The general guidance for children born overseas, including adopted children, is here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-on-how-adopted-children-can-become-british/intercountry-adoption-and-british-citizenship It is possible that he is automatically a British citizen but only if the adoption was certified as in accordance with the Hague ...


3

Your best strategy is to apply for British and Polish passports, and not register Singapore citizenship. For clarity, since it's not entirely clear from your question, the passports are irrelevant here, what matters is whether the birth has been registered as a citizen in each country. (Of course, you'll be unable to get a passport without this ...


3

Yes, they are eligible for the visa. Congress recognized that many children were aging out due to large USCIS processing backlogs, so it enacted the Child Status Protection Act (CSPA) to protect certain children from aging out. The CSPA went into effect on August 6, 2002. CSPA does not change the definition of a child. Instead, CSPA provides ...


2

he went to the Rotterdam International Secondary School (RISS) in the end. We arrived in October. He had to wait until after winter break for a spot. We tried Grotius College but they didn't feel comfortable with the short duration. And my son has some learning problems (suspected ADD, but never confirmed). We stopped hearing from the after going for ...


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