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17

In theory, Chinese dual citizenship is impossible (for adults who were only Chinese citizens at birth), since you automatically lose Chinese citizenship if you voluntarily receive another country's citizenship (Nationality law, Article 9). In practice, though, if they don't know you have dual citizenship, they can't take it away either. This does ...


12

This is probably a more general and tangental answer than you are hoping for, but it hopefully helps with other related expat questions as well. It is based on both my experience living in Indonesia and my discussions with Chinese expats in the US. As you say, there can be a question of disrespect. Many countries do not look kindly on foreigners coming in ...


8

(I lived in Shanghai for five years and toured Beijing and other Chinese cities.) English is spoken in high-end Western establishments. Elsewhere written and spoken English is very rare. Basic Chinese (numbers, taxi directions, common foods) is very helpful to surviving in China. Having said that, your attitude is key to the quality of your experience. ...


8

TL;DR China is not a homogeneous group of Chinese, it's a nation of individuals. Don't be afraid to ask questions, but don't treat people like interview subjects - treat them like people. You'll get far more information from a friend than from asking the "right" questions. ===== I often worried about this myself, before first visiting China. The answer,...


7

To add to the response above, paid maternity leave is mandated by the government, but its worthwhile to consider how a mainland employer would treat your wife all the same. During an interview, for instance, an employer would not be penalized if they denied your wife employment explicitly because she might have a child. My advice would be to seek a foreign ...


7

China's State Council has a Special Provisions on Labor Protection of Female Employees (text in Chinese): According to the Special Provisions, female employees are now entitled to 98 days of maternity leave for childbirth, an increase of 8 days from the current 90. Among the 98 days, 15 may be taken before giving birth. In cases of dystocia (...


7

First, it's not the passport that matters -- it's the nationality. If you are first a Chinese (PRC) citizen and then voluntarily acquire a foreign nationality, then by PRC law you automatically lose Chinese nationality at that point. Even if you naturalize in a foreign country and then don't get a passport, it wouldn't make a difference -- you would still ...


6

If by China you mean the People's Republic of China, Article 9 of the PRC Nationality law says that a PRC citizen residing abroad who voluntarily acquires a foreign nationality automatically loses PRC nationality. It is automatic, so yes, the moment you naturalized, your PRC nationality was gone. It doesn't come back just because you renounced your other ...


6

The most common type of Chinese name uses one character or syllable for the family name and two characters or syllables for the given name. E.g. MAO Zedong, ZHOU Enlai and XI Jinping. If this applied to all Chinese names, it would be easy to figure out which part is the family name and which part is the given name. However, names consisting of one character ...


6

(Note: I am assuming that by China you are talking about the People's Republic of China (PRC). It's very different for the Republic of China (ROC).) The word "recognize" means to treat something as if it exists or not. The precondition is that the thing exists. What's the point of "recognizing" or "not recognizing" something that doesn't exist? China ...


6

The visa you get is not a six-month visa. It is a one-entry visa that enables you to enter China, go to the University, pay the application fee, get the documents and then apply for your six-month residence permit (which includes the medical visit). This has to be done within 15 days, if memory serves. Failing this, you're breaking the law, and when you exit ...


5

As you know, because you have a history of being able to claim the FEIE and continue to reside in China, you meet the bona fide and physical presence tests for the FEIE. You of course must meet these tests every time you want to claim the exemption. But that's not what you're asking about. Can income from a US employer to a US employee count as "foreign ...


5

I like @kaishiro and @ChrisTavers answers, but I'd like to try to directly address your question: in China for example, what is acceptable to say without running afoul of the authorities. In summary, in China nothing in everyday conversation will cause your arrest or imprisonment. Background Growing up in the US, I was taught as "common knowledge" that ...


5

I'm going to come from my perspective of living in Mainland China for 3 years. If they are talking to you to begin with, nobody is going to get too offended regardless of what you say. If you do cross the line on something you can just excuse it as being a silly foreigner. It's the same as meeting anyone though really. If you're obnoxious and keep harping on ...


4

The official letter of invitation from the Foreign Experts Bureau or similar body will state on it the location where you can apply for the Z-visa. If this letter says Moscow or Russia then you can apply there. If the letter says the USA then you have to go back to the USA to apply. As far as I know, Americans always have to go to the USA and apply from ...


4

There are numerous ways to move money internationally, but China puts restrictions on how much currency can be moved out of the country in a given year. The most direct way is to process an IBAN/SWIFT/Wire transfer from a Chinese bank to a U.S. account. This requires that your friend has a USD-denominated bank account to receive the money, and the bank ...


4

You'll be able to do quite a lot of things in English, but your time will be much more enjoyable if you are able to learn a few simple words and phrases. There are situations you'll find yourself in where this will be useful. For example, purchasing train tickets and eating at local restaurants. In my experience of living in China, the locals will sometimes ...


4

I experienced this whole process and asked my teacher about it in detail. First, X2 is effective for 180 days from the entry and I did not experience such procedure as @dda mentioned. The application for the residence permit is only for those who have X1, in which case you must go to police station (actually, the police station that controls immigrants - ...


3

As far as I understand it, If you are a non-Indian national residing in India and You apply for a Chinese visa in India (not in your home country) You need an "alien registration card" - presumably a kind of identity card issued by India to non-Indian nationals residing in India.


3

Most countries recognize marriages performed in other countries, and the US is no exception. The couple can marry in any jurisdiction that will marry them. The advantage of marrying in the US is that they will not need to get the marriage license legitimized before presenting it with the application to the US federal government. This may be a relatively ...


3

If you meet the physical presence test, you are entitled to the exclusion regardless of the visa you are on. I can't answer with respect to your Chinese tax obligation. There are many countries that do not have an income tax; were you to work in one of them and meet the physical presence test and your income was under the excludable limit you would not owe ...


3

With a Z visa you do not require a return ticket. That being said, it is possible that Thai Airways will not be aware of this, and will expect a return ticket to board the flight. Your best bet would be to contact Thai Air and verify their policy on this.


3

In most major Chinese cities they have the driver's license test in English. You just need to buy the book with the Chinese traffic regulations (recent one) and learn it and go to the exam. You will need your passport, your driver's license from your country in original and copy and the proof of address in China (that piece of paper with your photo and ...


3

The only real possibility is to enlist for a language course. There should be a university (and probably several), where you girlfriend lives, that teaches Chinese. You would need to hurry though, as registration in universities will be around February 28, and Chinese consulates might close for a few days. Failing that, you have zero chance of extending ...


3

Yes. Anything that is brought in from overseas is liable for import duties. Sometimes there are (official or unofficial) minimum values under which the duties will be waived, but a new Mac is certainly above those minimum values (which are commonly around $20 or $30). However, if you bring an item into the country yourself in your own luggage and do not ...


3

You would at least need to first earn a bachelors degree to be eligible for any job. And without 2 years of working experience, it will be difficult to find a job in a large city, so you would have to check out the 'point system' to see if you are at least a 'Class B' foreigner (the points are based on your level of Chinese, work experience in and outside of ...


2

Yes it is possible to get a Chinese drivers license. There are many services that offer "streamlined" processes to do this (www.chinesedriverslicense.com for instance). Only certain testing centres offer the exams in English, so if you are going to do it on your own, you will need to get all the documentation and find a testing centre in English. If you use ...


2

Based on what you said. Get an F Tourist Visa. The documentation required for it won't involve much work on your behave other than preparing as if the visit is a short-term one. There may be an agency you can contact, such as Sunrise agency in Hong Kong. They may be able to advise you on this. I'm sure there are many people who just need to return for ...


2

Any type of visa is ok, but for a motorcycle driving license, the visa must be >90 days (continuous ... i.e., each stay must be at least 90 days). I'm gonna leave this website with more info about the motorcycle requirement and driving license, it's too long to post it here http://www.thebeijinger.com/forum/2012/05/11/motorcycles-beijing-fact-versus-...


2

Take it with you just in case. While it will be unlikely that you will be asked for it, it is general best practice that one has the most complete documentation at hand when passing through immigration.


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