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23

Currently, if you take a non-policy position in a foreign government, you cannot lose your U.S. citizenship without going in front of a U.S. consular official and saying you want to give up U.S. citizenship. If you take a policy position, it's more complicated but the government still needs to prove you intended to lose U.S. citizenship from "preponderance ...


22

Inside the EU, they should have the same benefits, so if you don't plan on leaving the EU, it should not matter. However countires outside of the EU doesn't look at the EU as a single country, so they can have different (reciprocal) agreements. This includes getting tourist and also work visas outside of the EU. In this case you might get some benefit of ...


19

I think that that statement is confusing "citizen" and "national". There are 6 types of British nationals (some can have more than one): British citizen, British overseas territories citizen, British overseas citizen, British subject, British National (Overseas), and British protected person. They all hold British passports, but the latter 5 statuses listed ...


16

There are countries who allow this, for instance: India: you need one Indian grandparent Ireland: you need one Irish grandparent Israel: that's the first example that came into mind. All Jews (also by conversion) have the right to become a citizen. Ukraine: also one Ukrainian grandparent required Those are the ones where having grandparents with the ...


16

According to PassportsUSA.com: With respect to loss of nationality, 349(a)(4) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), as amended, is the applicable section of law. Pursuant to 349(a)(4), accepting, serving in, or performing duties of in a foreign government is a potentially expatriating act. In order to come within the Act, the person must either be ...


16

In theory, Chinese dual citizenship is impossible (for adults who were only Chinese citizens at birth), since you automatically lose Chinese citizenship if you voluntarily receive another country's citizenship (Nationality law, Article 9). In practice, though, if they don't know you have dual citizenship, they can't take it away either. This does ...


15

There are many countries in the world that do not recognize dual nationalities. So for example: Ukraine. In order to obtain Ukrainian citizenship you have to give up any other citizenships you may have held, which means that if you want to work for the government in Ukraine in a position which which requires citizenship the normal procedure is that you ...


15

Overview Currently, yes, a naturalised British Citizen can live anywhere in the world without losing UK citizenship - so long as they intended to live in the United Kingdom when they requested and were granted citizenship. There's a strong precedent for this structure to remain intact, but the rules may of course change as the political situation changes. ...


15

No. (At least, I can say with certainty that Germany only counts residency in Germany. I strongly expect the other countries to be the same.) Granting citizenship is solely at the discretion of individual countries; there is no European dimension to it at all. This is a problem for people who move every three or four years, and would like to be able to ...


14

There are a number of free websites that provide sample tests. I cannot find anything on the sites suggesting that they are official copies of the test, but the questions are similar to what is in the official handbook. One such site, that I am not affiliated with, is: http://www.theuktest.com/life-in-the-uk-test/1. An example question is: Which of these ...


14

Settlement (aka indefinite leave to remain, ILR) means you retain your existing nationality, gain the right to live and work in the UK, but do not gain right of abode. To travel outside the UK you would still need to use your existing passport, and acquire visas as a national of your native country where required. You would still use the overseas channel at ...


13

There are several options: Marry a US citizen. Once the US government is satisfied that your marriage is not a sham marriage (i.e.: you didn't get married just for the immigration benefits) - you'll get a green card (permanent residency). After three years as permanent resident married to a US citizen, you can apply for US citizenship. Get a green card on ...


13

The requirement is one of intent. Once granted citizenship, you are a UK citizen with all the rights that go with that - including the right to leave the UK, should you so choose. If that is your intention from the start, then you would not meet the requirements to be granted citizenship. By applying for citizenship, you are asserting that you do indeed ...


13

From Dual Nationality: In order to lose U.S. nationality, the law requires that the person must apply for the foreign nationality voluntarily, by free choice, and with the intention to give up U.S. nationality. The page goes on to describe what intention means. Under normal circumstances, US citizens do not automatically lose their US citizenship upon ...


13

It's relatively easy, yes, but there are several caveats: You need to become a resident in France before you apply (and this requirement is assessed more broadly than residence for, say, tax purposes). It's reasonably easy if you have family/marry someone (a registered partnership or PACS is good too), not so much if you want to qualify for a work permit ...


13

Yes, you are French, and the reason is your dad was French the day you were born (at least it seems very likely it was the case). As you are French, you can request a passport or national ID from your city. You will have to prove you are French by showing a birth certificate and a proof your dad was French at that time.


13

As you were born before 1983 and your father was a British Citizen, section 5 of the 1948 nationality act applies to you. Based on this act you are considered a British Citizen by descent, if your father is a British Citizen otherwise than by descent, for example he was actually born in the UK or became citizen by naturalization or registration. If these ...


12

The guidelines of becoming a British Citizen are pretty straight forward and available online: There are different ways to become a British citizen. The most common is called ‘naturalisation’. You can apply for British citizenship by naturalisation if: you’re 18 or over you’re of sound mind you’re of good character you’ll continue to ...


12

Generally not. Residence requirements for naturalization generally refer to residence in the country itself. As an example, the naturalization requirements for France include in some cases a requirement for residence in France. Residence in another EU country does not serve to meet any requirement for naturalization in France.


11

To add on to StzupY's answer, a country's nationals often have a much easier time getting things done. That means, even if the law eventually treats everyone practically the same, foreign EU-nationals usually have to deal with more paperwork and longer processing times. I also think that there are still enough differences in civil law, that could have a ...


11

It seems pretty clear from the following information from the US State Department that you or the child can declare US citizenship by paternity at any time before the child is 18. If you are the father and you are a US citizen, then child has US citizenship, they just need to have it recognized by the US government. Birth Abroad Out-of-Wedlock to a U.S. ...


10

I personally found the life in the UK test to be pretty easy. I was done in 5 minutes, and so were 90% of the people in the room, so it's not likely to be a huge difficulty for you. As for studying simply read a copy of The life in the uk book, which is the official guide to the test published by the UK government. Every question asked on the test comes ...


10

As the others have said, the differences are mainly going to be perceptible outside the EU. But even within the union, some countries restrict some of their benefits to actual nationals: for instance, I'm a French citizen living in Sweden, and I can't benefit from their study grant program. I'd have to have the Swedish nationality. This is the only example ...


10

The most significant difference is that as a British citizen, you can apply for a British passport. As a British citizen (with a British passport) you can travel and work in countries where you may otherwise have had to apply for a visa. As you are Australian, you can become a British citizen without losing your Australian citizenship (this is often called ...


10

You need to provide more information. Whether the child is automatically a U.S. citizen at birth depends on the details of the situation: If the child was born in wedlock, and the U.S. citizen parent was physically present in the U.S. for 5 years before the child's birth, including 2 after turning 14, the child is automatically a U.S. citizen at birth. ...


10

Canada's Citizenship Act says 3 (1) Subject to this Act, a person is a citizen if (a) the person was born in Canada after February 14, 1977; So yes, the child will be a Canadian citizen from the moment of his or her birth.


9

One advantage could be the work permition - there were some restrictions for citizens of Bulgaria and Romania until 2014, and there are still restrictions for citizens of Croatia - only 8 EU countries don't restrict Croatian workers. So Croatian citizens (and most likely citizens of upcoming EU members) will benefit from dual EU citizenship Another point ...


9

Off the top of my head Israel. Under the Law of Return if at least 1 of your grandparents was Jewish you can return to Israel and obtain citizenship. Additionally Lithuania has a condition that if your parent or a grandparent held Lithuanian citizenship prior to June 15th, 1940 can have their citizenship restored up to the 3rd generation (basically your ...


9

In Italy, you can get the citizenship by blood (jus sanguinis) as long as at least one of the following conditions are satisfied (you can check the article in Wikipedia): The Italian male ancestor was born after 1861 (year of creation of the Kingdom of Italy). If he was born before 1861, he has to have acquired the Italian citizenship during his lifetime. ...


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