8

You should always assume formal unless you have been advised otherwise. It's generally ok to end up a little overdressed, but it's not ok to end up underdressed. However, software companies can vary. It is going to depend greatly on the culture of the company. If you can, do some research on the culture before the interview. Is there a "team" page on their ...


6

I prefer the layered approach. One advantage is flexibility. As it is rainy, you'll want your outer layer to be waterproof, or at least water resistant. I prefer thin woolen underwear. Silk or synthetic base layers are also effective. I like the wool because it tends to smell a lot better and require far less frequent washing. It is also somewhat warmer ...


4

A few options: Look for a dry cleaner (that's called stomerij in Dutch). Most will be open on Saturday and closed on Sunday (some are even open on Sunday but the one I know is in Rotterdam…) Regular service is not same-day however, usually more like 2 or 3. I assume some express service might be available for a premium in some places but I never needed it ...


4

In addition to layering mentioned in the other answers, I have a couple of extra tips (a finn, used to -20-30 C): Protect extremities well. You can have a good jacket and trousers, but if you forget about the fragile bits, it won't help that much. You can find gloves designed especially for cycling in cold (extra padding) that may be worth a look. Get ...


4

The following is copied from my own answer on Travel SE. I grew up in Norway. I've gone skiing, running, walking, playing, hiking, bicycling, etc. in the mountains there and in temperatures as cold as around -20 Celsius as a part of my childhood and youth. The single best tip I can give you is to wear wool. There is nothing like wool to keep you warm in a ...


3

This is hard to answer as we have no idea what you mean by "top layers". I am also not sure why you would want to (or how you even could) buy clothing in the tropics and try to adapt that to a winter in Michigan. At the very least you will need a warm winter coat. Dressing in layers is also a good idea, but the number of layers you'd need are totally ...


3

I cannot comment on very specific clothing, but here is my experience. I moved from a climate similar to coastal one you mention, to Canada. Now I walk to and from work all year long, from +30 in the Summer to -30 and even -40 in the Winter. The specific clothing that works for you, you'll have to find. What I learned after a while, is what I need to wear ...


3

That's a service offered by dry cleaners, usually after cleaning your suit (but I guess that only ironing already clean clothes is also possible, have never done that). That kind of store is called a stomerij in Dutch. They are usually open on Saturdays, but will definitely be closed on Sundays. There will be several in all cities. A search for "stomerij ...


2

Based on my australian experience, a formal suit is the best choice unless stated otherwise in an interview invitation.


2

If you go barefoot indoors, your feet will probably get dirty (the soles will turn black). However it is very unlikely that you will acquire diseases from doing this. The common diseases that people worry about is verucas (plantar warts) and athletes foot (fungal infection), but in fact the wart virus and athletes foot fungus are present all over the place....


2

It's likely you're not so much cold as dry. Something people from Mediterranean coastal climates don't realize is just how dry the air gets when the temperature falls below freezing. Try wearing a scarf, a ski mask, or something else with a loose weave that you can pull over your mouth and nose. At first, it will feel funny breathing through it, but it ...


1

If your feet are cold, then you may wish to wear something on your feet to keep warm, for example shoes slippers socks if you're worried about slipping and falling while walking on bare floors wearing socks, then you might prefer non-skid socks If your feet aren't cold, there is nothing at all to keep you from going barefoot in your own dorm room. I have ...


1

As a cyclist myself, I will say for cycling you want a windproof jacket. For dressing at other times, the important thing is layering. With correct layering, you should be fine and the flexibility of eliminating layers as it gets warmer is great. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Layered_clothing Wool beanies are very good for protecting your head and ears....


1

When biking in the cold, I find that the first body part to get cold is always the hands (as they are exposed to the wind and you cannot put them in your pockets). I recommend wearing two pairs of gloves: a pair of thin cotton gloves underneath, and then a pair of regular winter gloves or mittens. Besides providing extra warmth, this has the additional ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible