7

There is no reason to keep your move secret or to engage a lawyer. And there is no standard name for the service other than 'moving'. I know from personal experience that American Express, MasterCard, and Visa cards originally issued in the USA continue to work after you move to Europe and change your address. I have done it in three different countries ...


6

I personally use my parents place as my US address. Then I go paperless and pay my accounts through a bank that I transfer money into from where I am now. Anything important is mailed to me by my parents. Initially you will get alerts or phone calls that you've made a foreign transaction. Just explain to them you will be out of the country for a few months.


5

I can speak from my experience as a Canadian citizen and resident with a permanent US mailing address, and my curious quest to attain US credit. As an actual US resident, you should have a considerably easier time. First, apply for a basic credit card (e.g. Capital One Platinum). They may want evidence of your income. They will probably give you a low ...


4

Hiring an attorney merely to be able to continue to use a credit card would seem very expensive, you only need a post office box or something like that (USPS calls companies offering this service “commercial mail receiving agencies”). As long as the credit card company doesn't notice you moved abroad, you should in any case be able to continue to use the ...


2

You could use it in the US, but there are fees for using your SocGen card outside the Eurozone. I find the SocGen card to be unreliable for uses other than with a merchant. Online my transactions are declined unpredictably, and contactless payments are similarly randomly accepted or declined. As for whether they'll send you a card to the US... not sure. ...


2

You might get a tax refund, as I did when I returned. And then it will be very difficult for you to get that money to you if you do not have a local bank account. If you are sure of not getting any tax refunds in future, go ahead by closing the account.


2

Some credit cards have annual fees that needs to be paid and if you no longer have an income in the country it might be difficult to know when and how to settle those and in some cases they can then be forwarded to Debt collection agencies. This will then cause you an immense amount of trouble. The above is the only drawback I can think of, if you think ...


1

Just apply for another free credit card. If you do not have any problems with Schufa, it should be possible. I find an idea to pay for a credit card quite strange. Rather, I prefer bank to pay me for a credit card. Currently, it is possible with Amazon VISA (bonus for opening a credit card, 0,5% cashback on all, 2% cashback on Amazon), Santander 1plus card (...


1

I still have my Dutch bank account even though I have not lived there for 5 years. My wife and I still own a house there and my sister in law lives there so our situation may be different than yours. That said, I have found it very convenient to have my Dutch bank account. I use It every time I visit. There are many places where it is only possible to pay ...


1

I assume you are referring to credit cards in the US. Some US banks are notorious for making it tricky to pay on time, which allows them to charge high fees, and also harms your credit rating. Credit unions are owned by their members and have a good reputation for low fees and convenient policies. You're new employer may have its own; otherwise there will be ...


1

tl;dr: You don't need to do this, using an Israeli credit card is fine. I have heard that credit cards in Israel generally do not allow the users to contest charges That's not true. You can definitely contest charges. You can't cancel charges arbitrarily though, i.e. you need to make an argument regarding why the charge should be rejected. And while I ...


1

You start at the beginning when building a credit rating in the US. The best way to begin is with a secured credit card from a credit union and yes, you will need to present a Social Security card to get it. (ITIN is not good enough.) A typical secured credit card is on the order of $500. Use it for a good while, build up a good credit history and when your ...


1

As a Canadian who has native US credit cards and has never even actually lived in the United States, I can tell you that it is absolutely possible to carry US credit cards while not being resident in the country. You will need a couple of things: You need a US mailing address. This is absolutely required, even if you are not receiving paper bills. At a ...


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