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7

There is no reason to keep your move secret or to engage a lawyer. And there is no standard name for the service other than 'moving'. I know from personal experience that American Express, MasterCard, and Visa cards originally issued in the USA continue to work after you move to Europe and change your address. I have done it in three different countries ...


6

I personally use my parents place as my US address. Then I go paperless and pay my accounts through a bank that I transfer money into from where I am now. Anything important is mailed to me by my parents. Initially you will get alerts or phone calls that you've made a foreign transaction. Just explain to them you will be out of the country for a few months.


5

I can speak from my experience as a Canadian citizen and resident with a permanent US mailing address, and my curious quest to attain US credit. As an actual US resident, you should have a considerably easier time. First, apply for a basic credit card (e.g. Capital One Platinum). They may want evidence of your income. They will probably give you a low ...


5

Mexico doesn't yet have "affordable" credit cards, by US standards. Every card I've seen has an annual fee (200 MXN/year is among the lowest), and very high interest rates (APR around 30%). If you need a card for local payments, and domestic online payments, all the banks issue debit cards. These are mostly Visa debit cards that work both locally and ...


4

Hiring an attorney merely to be able to continue to use a credit card would seem very expensive, you only need a post office box or something like that (USPS calls companies offering this service “commercial mail receiving agencies”). As long as the credit card company doesn't notice you moved abroad, you should in any case be able to continue to use the ...


3

If you already have a Social Security Number you should be able to apply for a secured credit card. The applications from various banks: US Bank Bank of America Wells Fargo Do not require you to be a Green Card holder to provide you with credit. They do use your SSN to get credit reports on you to determine your creditworthiness so given that you haven't ...


2

Yes. I got unsecured (once my credit was good enough) credit cards, a car loan and a mortgage before adjusting to permanent resident status (and a couple of years before applying to adjust).


2

First, some theory. Any foreigner can get a credit card & a credit rating in Mexico as long as you have FM2 or FM3, which are similar to resident cards, and the actual resident cards (which are new). You also need some way to prove your income (payroll slips, tax reports, or debit/checking card deposits for 3 months). There are a lot of affordable ...


2

Some banks here, like Banamex or Bancomer, have credit cards specifically for people who never had a card before. They calculate your credit line based on whatever income you have received on a savings account over the last 3 months. Your credit line will most likely be pretty low, but I personally find it better, no risk of falling into unpayable debt. Do ...


2

As a general rule if you have no credit history in the US and you apply for a random unsecured credit card you will be turned down. That you have had an application declined won't appear in your credit report, but the fact that you applied will and this might have a small, temporary negative effect. Of course your situation is a bit different in that, ...


1

I believe you are unlikely to find such cards offered in the Netherlands. The reason is that for a credit card company to offer 1.5% rebate on purchases, those purchases must have a high mark-up to begin with, or alternatively an extra-high fee for credit card use. As the Netherlands is more of a debit-card culture, the former would be rare - you are most ...


1

As a Canadian who has native US credit cards and has never even actually lived in the United States, I can tell you that it is absolutely possible to carry US credit cards while not being resident in the country. You will need a couple of things: You need a US mailing address. This is absolutely required, even if you are not receiving paper bills. At a ...


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