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Question #1: Can you make it on $500? Short answer: It's going to be tight, but yes. Question #2: Can you save a reasonable amount of money? Probably not. Salary after tax Before we start, we need to calculate the amount of tax you will pay. As of 2016, 500$ equals ~12100CZK, which after tax would be ~10400CZK. I'll be using the Czech currency from now ...


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I'd recommend to start by looking for a job. First, it will be less stressful to move into a new country if you already have a job lined up; second, your employer will probably be able to help you with all the paperwork. If you're a Dutch citizen, you won't need a visa or a work permit (as @svick points out in their comment). You need health insurance from ...


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There are three separate questions here: Are non-EU citizen students allowed to work in the Czech Republic? The answer is yes, you may work for as many hours as you want. See this page for proof: No employment permit, Employee Card or Blue Card is required from a foreigner: who is systematically preparing for a future occupation in the territory of ...


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Aside from what's listed on the official ISIC site, you can usually get a 50% discount at most Czech museums and exhibitions. Some student parties might also have free entry for those with a valid ISIC card. And some bus companies have a small discount for those with an ISIC. Nothing related to accommodation or public transport, though, as that usually ...


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The Czech Ministry of the Interior gives the following definition for the Blue Card (Modrá karta): An EU Blue Card is a new residential status designed for a long-term stay involving the performance of a highly skilled job (§ 42i of the Act on the Residence of Foreign Nationals). An EU Blue Card entitles a foreign national to stay and perform a job, ...


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Students are allowed to work in Czech Republic, so you can work for as long as your visa is valid. However as soon as its cancelled you will need to leave the country and wait for the work permit to be issued, no exceptions. I would suggest playing everything by the book and waiting for your work permit to arrive.


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Czech consulates have seen all kinds of fraud over the years and they will know your accommodation proof isn't real from a mile away. Your options are thus: Ask your company to help out with securing the required documentation Bite the bullet and rent an apartment remotely. You can always find a new one later on after moving


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Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer nor do I have any other official capacity, so please take everything here with a grain of salt. All the following translations are mine, not in any way official or binding. Permanent Residency Foreign nationals that have proven Czech origins, may apply for a permanent residence permit for reasons worthy of consideration …, ...


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Something like this can work, but only if several conditions are met. As noted in the answer by JonathanReez, the ECJ has ruled that the member states can't impose further arbitrary restrictions on top of this, but it may already be hard enough to satisfy the basic ones. First of all, any time you find yourself wondering about some aspect of cross-border ...


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In theory, Czech companies are allowed to post their workers to other countries within the EU. However in practice this seems like a blatant attempt to dodge German immigration laws as the Czech company is only hiring you for the purpose of working in another country, rather than sending out you to Germany after a period of employment at their office. I ...


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According to the Czech ministry of foreign affairs: Duly completed university education or higher vocational education, the duration of which was at least 3 years, is deemed to be a high level of skills. You are therefore not eligible for a blue card.


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The Czech authorities don't care about your Swiss residency permit outside of the scope of short-term travel. Therefore you should apply for a Czech student visa or residency permit. Usually people get a visa first and then change it to a residency permit when inside the country. You cannot apply for Czech visas or first-time residency permits inside the ...


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Yes, you have to provide proof of qualification. According to the Ministry of Interior: Documents proving the professional qualifications for performance of the desired job, if this condition follows from the nature of the employment or an international agreement sets such a condition, particularly: a document proving the required education (such ...


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The requirement for university applicants to affirm their high school diploma (aka nostrification) will be abolished on September 1st 2016. The relevant paragraph from the updated law is: d) zahraničním dokladem o zahraničním středoškolském vzdělání, který byl získán absolvováním studia ve středoškolském vzdělávacím programu na zahraniční střední škole ...


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Type D residency permits are essentially equivalent to short-term Schengen visas when it comes to other countries. The Czech consulate to say in New York has the following to say about working on a short-term visa: employment (work permit issued by the Employment Office or employment contract, if the type of work is exempt from the work permit in ...


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You can find the information (in English) about foreign employment in Czech Republic on the portal of Czech Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs. Note that the law was changed a few months ago, and some English pages state that English translation is still in the process of proofreading.


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