19

Yes, it's possible, the term of the art is perpetual traveller ("PT"). Basically, since many countries allow you to visit for up to six months without being considered a "resident", you can arrange your life so that your income is earned by a company in a low-to-no-tax country (eg. Singapore, which has multi-year 0% startup schemes and hefty exemptions ...


13

If you are mobile and prepared to pick a place based on taxes, you might be able to use that to your advantage but it's certainly not as easy as moving around and ensuring you never stay more than X days in a given place. You need to pay attention to several things: Income can be taxable where it is generated. In many countries, if you have a work contract ...


12

What's for me the best option for paying taxes? On time, preferably electronically. That would be the best option. I'm not going to spend more than 3 months in 1 country. That means you'll have to pay taxes to at least 4 different countries at any give year... I suggest you talk to tax advisers familiar with the relevant countries' tax laws to plan ...


6

Also bear in mind that it is strictly illegal in some countries, to work while you are located in that country if you do not have a work permit. This is usually because they have no way of taxing you if you don't have a work permit, but the procedure for getting one can be long and drawn out, and require you to have an employer in that country. Just because ...


5

I lived in the UK for 5 years, and when I moved out of the country, I left my EEA partner there. In the end, I was never able to visit him because of this stuff. So I know a thing or two about this. You will be allowed into the country with the visa waiver program for 6 months, as you mentioned. If you are physically in the UK while you are doing work, it'...


4

I think your best bet is a mail scanning and forwarding service. (Google it, there are many, and I haven't used one to recommend.) Most will: Give you a 'personal' address, intended to be professional looking; I.e. A street address with a 'Suite' number or equivalent for your personal account. Provide a website for viewing all scanned/photoed envelopes/...


4

I believe you might be able to live your life without becoming a tax resident under any country's laws, though you might want to look carefully at the tax laws of the countries you are leaving. I don't know about the UK or Poland but Canada, for example, makes it a little tough to become a non-resident for tax purposes even if you aren't physically present ...


3

For anyone curious, I discovered that Australia and UK have a Double Taxation Treaty that allows for this kind of thing so long as you're only staying less than 183 days for a calendar year and/or tax year. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/australia-tax-treaties There are a few exceptions here and there, but article 14 (details 1 and 2 combined ...


3

Legally speaking you do. Practically speaking, if you don't get a visa and don't tell the immigration officers that that's what you plan to do - there's a very low chance of being caught. That said, you will be breaking the law, and if someone tips about you to the authorities - you may be arrested and deported.


2

Many (some? most?) countries do not have a concept of “registration” like Germany (and a few other countries like the Netherlands, Austria, Switzerland, Poland, Hungary, etc.) has. That's an idea you need to lose to think clearly about the issue. In countries that don't have that, you would be deemed a resident based on the length or the intent of your stay. ...


2

In the end, we chose a "détachement" solution under which I am still covered by French social security.


2

My current understanding is that I can visit the UK for up to 6 months out of the year. Is that correct? That is generally true, but if you are obviously staying for a relatively longer period of time, they will ask questions. Is there any other way to extend the stay up to a year? Only for the most extreme emergencies, typically medical reasons ...


1

Here is what Italy has to say: Italy deems you resident for tax purposes if you've stayed there at least 183 days in the past tax year. You can click here to see if you've become a Canadian resident for tax purposes. Canada generally goes by a date of December 31, so if you are resident here December 31, 2017, you would file taxes here for the 2017 tax ...


1

In most countries, if you are not a tax resident, you will not pay taxes there on any capital gains (and often also interest and dividends) there, though there is often some minimum withholding tax for dividends. It is possible to not be tax resident anywhere and therefore to not pay capital gains taxes. See, for example, this question in Taxation magazine: ...


1

I would say that no permit is required for a short period with foreign employer - you are still fulfilling your obligations and paying taxes through your current employer. You are simply travelling and logging in from a different location for your work.


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