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In the US divorce is a matter for state law, but generally it is possible to divorce in the US if your spouse lives at a US address at the time the divorce is filed. It is often possible to divorce in the US even if your spouse has moved overseas, though some states may restrict this to uncontested divorces. If your marriage certificate is not in English you ...


5

They most likely need to get divorced in the jurisdiction where they reside. For example, in New York State, at least one spouse must have resided in the state, generally for one year: Before a New York Court can give you a divorce, you need to show that you and/or your spouse have lived in New York State for a certain amount of time, without ...


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For people who finds themselves in the same situation, here's what happened. I was able to send my application to Home Office to "retain rights of residence'' from within the UK and was granted for 5 years BRC .


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on www.gov.uk/ Visas when you separate or divorce 1. Tell the Home Office You must tell the Home Office when you divorce or separate from your partner if your visa is based on your relationship. You must then either apply for a new visa or leave the UK. Your visa is based on your relationship if you have permission to stay in the ...


4

You cannot simply pick a convenient country. Since several countries are involved, EU rules apply. The conditions are complex but one of you must in any case be a resident in the country where you will file for divorce. Also note that the rules governing the divorce are not necessarily the rules from the country where you can file. It means that, in some ...


4

The sticker is presumably a reminder intended for, among others, people who were married in a foreign jurisdiction, so the records of the marriage can be amended with the information that the marriage has ended. In your case, since you were married in Germany, that's not relevant to your "home country." (Bureaucratic instructions like this often assume a ...


4

Nothing happens. Once she becomes a US permanent resident (i.e. green card holder), her status is not dependent on anyone else's status, nor on her relationship with anyone else. She can remain a permanent resident forever, renewing her card as many times as she wants, and she can apply for naturalization if and when she qualifies and is willing to. (This, ...


4

Property division in a divorce is handled by the court in the jurisdiction where the divorce is granted. However, it's possible that if an Indian citizen is divorced overseas, a transfer of that citizen's property (located within India) to the divorced spouse is in some fashion limited or restricted by Indian law. Thus, you'll need input from: A lawyer or ...


3

May an F-2 visa holder marry inside the US with a US citizen/green card holder without ending the previous marriage? No. If someone with F-2 visa status comes to the US, then wants to marry with a US citizen/green card holder, should he/she ends/gets divorce of his/her previous wife/husband even if their marriage happened outside of the US and they both ...


3

The correct uk.gov page for your case is Apply for a UK residence card, where, under Eligibility, it notes the circumstances entitling one to a retained right of residence. Retained rights of residence You can also apply if you used to have a family member, or extended family member, who was a permanent resident or qualified person. This is called a ‘...


2

I tried to apply for a family reunion visa only to make an officer extremely puzzled over my situation. She needed to consult (at length!) with her colleagues and her supervisor to get back to me and say: "this visa is only for family members that stay with adult family members". So if my children were 18+ - only then could I have used that option. So (...


2

The ILR should not be affected in this case by your matrimonial status however it is intended for people settling in the country. In effect the ILR does lapse after 2 years of living abroad however there may be exceptions depending on individual circumstances. I would advise to contact you citizen advice bureau for free legal advice if your are still in the ...


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No. Your class of admission won't change. The code reflects how you got permanent residency, and a later divorce doesn't change that.


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