22

Inside the EU, they should have the same benefits, so if you don't plan on leaving the EU, it should not matter. However countires outside of the EU doesn't look at the EU as a single country, so they can have different (reciprocal) agreements. This includes getting tourist and also work visas outside of the EU. In this case you might get some benefit of ...


17

In theory, Chinese dual citizenship is impossible (for adults who were only Chinese citizens at birth), since you automatically lose Chinese citizenship if you voluntarily receive another country's citizenship (Nationality law, Article 9). In practice, though, if they don't know you have dual citizenship, they can't take it away either. This does ...


11

Most countries don't tax their citizens, only their residents. The most notable exception is the US. In the EU countries however you only need to pay tax if you are a resident there. More specifically in Italy: If you live in Italy for more than 183 days in a year, or your life is centered in Italy and you are in the Population Registry: You must pay tax on ...


11

To add on to StzupY's answer, a country's nationals often have a much easier time getting things done. That means, even if the law eventually treats everyone practically the same, foreign EU-nationals usually have to deal with more paperwork and longer processing times. I also think that there are still enough differences in civil law, that could have a ...


10

As the others have said, the differences are mainly going to be perceptible outside the EU. But even within the union, some countries restrict some of their benefits to actual nationals: for instance, I'm a French citizen living in Sweden, and I can't benefit from their study grant program. I'd have to have the Swedish nationality. This is the only example ...


10

The "problem" of naming children as an expat is usually quite complex, but for your actual problem it's fortunately quite simple: yes, it's possible to have the child's British passport contain practically any name you want, as in Britain the naming laws are very lenient. You can also change your child's name (if all parents consent to this) using a deed ...


10

Based on the information you provided the Government's citizenship checking site is actually quite helpful (it's sometimes not so helpful if you were born before 1983, but in your case it's actually okay): When were you born? On or after 1 January 1983 As you were born in 1992 Were you born in the UK or a qualifying territory? No No, the USA is not ...


9

One advantage could be the work permition - there were some restrictions for citizens of Bulgaria and Romania until 2014, and there are still restrictions for citizens of Croatia - only 8 EU countries don't restrict Croatian workers. So Croatian citizens (and most likely citizens of upcoming EU members) will benefit from dual EU citizenship Another point ...


8

Finally, I was able to get my Portuguese citizenship card and passport as well after a month and a half long process. I am posting the entire process which I went through in New Delhi India Portugal Consulate. I emailed the consulate for appointment and documents, so they replied there is no need for appointment, the application are processed on first-come-...


8

For the benefit of anybody in this situation who is wondering, and would like a real data point instead of conjecture or pontification, here is what actually happened: When trying to check out through immigration my 'lack of entry' was noticed, and I was sent to another line for exceptions. This seconds line was fairly well populated and was pretty dynamic ...


7

I'm Italian and I moved to the UK two years ago. As Italians, if we permanently reside in a foreign country we don't pay taxes on what we earn abroad. There are taxes to pay if you own a property in Italy, but that's a different story, of course. As citizens, if we plan to move abroad for longer than a year, however, the Italian law imposes that we sign up ...


7

What they say seems correct. You are a "British citizen by descent", because you were automatically a British citizen at birth due to being born outside the UK to a parent who was a British citizen otherwise than by descent. It doesn't matter what they did or did not do after your birth; you are still a British citizen by descent. You cannot "upgrade" ...


7

As a dual US/UK citizen if you live outside the US, you are eligible for an exemption for health coverage. If you are living in the US, then you are not an "ordinary resident" of the UK, despite the fact that you are a UK citizen, and you will not be covered by the NHS. According to the NHS: If you are moving abroad on a permanent basis, you will no ...


7

It's the same as getting normal citizenship. From the UK Government site on citizenship: You can apply for British citizenship by naturalisation if: you’re 18 or over you’re of good character, eg you don’t have a serious or recent criminal record you’ll continue to live in the UK you have met the knowledge of English and life in the UK ...


7

Such a scenario is indeed possible. For example, I know several countries where the law allows the authorities to strip a recently naturalised citizen of their citizenship if they have been found guilty of a terrorism-related offense but do require that the person still has another citizenship. At the same time, it does not mean that renouncing other ...


7

It does not matter where the wedding is actually performed. Both the US and Australia (like virtually all countries) recognise marriages that have been legally performed according to the laws of the country where the wedding took place. If they get married in the US, then after getting married, your son's wife would apply for one of the Australian Partner ...


6

(Note: I am assuming that by China you are talking about the People's Republic of China (PRC). It's very different for the Republic of China (ROC).) The word "recognize" means to treat something as if it exists or not. The precondition is that the thing exists. What's the point of "recognizing" or "not recognizing" something that doesn't exist? China ...


6

The State Department has information on Dual Nationality. Some important excerpts: However, a person who acquires a foreign nationality by applying for it may lose U.S. nationality. In order to lose U.S. nationality, the law requires that the person must apply for the foreign nationality voluntarily, by free choice, and with the intention to give up U.S. ...


6

You are a British citizen. First of all, from what you said ("birthright"), you didn't "become a US citizen in 1991" -- you were a US citizen from birth. Second, even if you acquired a foreign nationality after birth, since 1948, British citizenship is not lost upon voluntarily acquiring a foreign nationality.


6

It depends on your status in Namibian law. Disclaimer: this answer is based entirely on Wikipedia; I have no first-hand (or second-hand) knowledge or experience in Namibian or South African nationality law; I have some second-hand knowledge of the state of affairs in the UK. Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Namibian_nationality_law https://en....


6

Do I qualify for a UK passport\citizenship? See Apply for citizenship if you have a British parent/You were born before 1983. Since you did not mention your father, I presume he was not British. This would mean that you are not automatically a British citizen, but you can apply: If you’re not automatically a citizen You may be eligible to apply ...


5

Your definition of OCI is correct. In practice, OCI is more of a liability than a help. It does not help you with most officialdom, because you deal with low- to mid-level people who have no clue what it is. You may find someone who can be persuaded to accept it in lieu of your foreign passport, but that's rare. Every office, such as property tax, or gas, ...


5

Generally speaking, French law does not make multiple citizenship difficult in any way. You don't need to renounce any prior nationality to become French and there are very few situations in which you lose it when you are. Perd-on la nationalité française en acquérant une autre nationalité ? is a brief overview of the latter aspect from the official ...


5

Taxation will depend on the country into which you move. Some countries have mutual agreements against double taxations, aimed at avoiding charging residents twice. These usually don't include countries which are considered fiscal paradises/too fiscally advantageous, mainly to fight tax evasion. Since you mention Italy I'll use this country as an example. ...


5

Must my child travel on a USA passport (they already have a UK passport); According to US law (8 USC 1185(b)), it is "unlawful" for a US citizen to enter and leave the US without bearing a US passport, with some exceptions (e.g. enhanced driver's licenses, NEXUS cards, and children born in the US under 16 crossing a land border) which don't apply to your ...


5

According to Pakistani nationality law: s.14 Dual Citizenship or nationality not permitted. If you hold a citizenship outside of Pakistan the Pakistani citizenship is terminated Unless one decides to renounce the other Unless one has citizenship in Britain or its colonies Unless one is a female married to a man who is not a Pakistani citizen ...


5

An updated answer for future readers: Private individuals cannot seek insurance through Kammarkollegiet, it seems. Organizations such as universities can, and if you are a tuition-paying student will probably do so for you. In my case, I was able to acquire a personnummer smoothly with only my Finnish passport thanks to the Inter-Nordic agreement. If you ...


5

Legally, it seems you are not a citizen of X anymore. If that is indeed the case, by applying as a citizen of X, you would be misrepresenting your situation and using an invalid document fraudulently. You did write that you told the French consulate about your “dual” citizenship but if you are not actually a citizen of country X and even if it issued the ...


5

First of all, we need to clarify what you mean by "revoke" here. Several of countries that you claimed can "revoke" the citizenship of naturalized citizens, including the US and Canada, actually cannot involuntarily (i.e. without the person's intent) take away citizenship of naturalized citizens at all (in fact, for the US, it's constitutionally forbidden). ...


4

If at the time of the child's birth, the father was a "British citizen" (there are other kinds of British nationals; but if he is from the UK then he is almost certainly a British citizen) "otherwise than by descent" (i.e. citizen by birth in the UK, or citizen by naturalization or registration), then the children would be automatically (and involuntarily) ...


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