11

After a bit search, I was lucky to find a school that teaches fully in Arabic just like any school back home. All subjects are in Arabic and some English and teachers are native speakers as well. The school is called Alharamain Saudi Academy and it is administered by the Saudi Embassy in Jakarta. Also, they do accept any Arab not only Saudis and they have ...


11

The EU directive is somewhat vague about that and the details are left to each individual participating state. In Germany, the relevant statute is the Aufenthaltsgesetz (“Residence act”). My reading of article 19 is that you do not need a degree in the exact same field (outside of regulated professions of course). But you do need some recognised higher ...


6

The information you received is kind of correct but it's probably a lot more difficult than you realize. In general, you have to have resided in France for five years before applying for naturalisation. That requirement is reduced to two years if you have successfully studied for two years at a French higher education institution (that's the rule you heard ...


6

According to NZQF (New Zealand Qualifications Framework) Postgraduate diplomas and certificates, Bachelors degrees with Honours is LEVEL 8 and can score 50 points Bachelors degrees, Graduate diplomas is LEVEL 7 and can score 50 points Since you mentioned your qualification is equivalent to a university honors degree in England, it should be recognized by ...


5

The claim by UKIP's leader is not true with respect to education. Terminology In the following I will follow the US State Department's wording for "immigrant"/"nonimmigrant": immigrant visas are visas for the purpose of "[living] permanently in the United States" as "a lawful permanent resident" (source), so all other ...


5

Since I have come back from German Embassy and no one else has posted an answer yet, I would try to summarize my findings in case it helps someone. So basically German Embassy needs the equivalence certificate from ZAB even if one's degree is listed as 'Entspricht' on Anabin database. This may be true for only a selected set of Embassies but for the ...


4

Ultimately it is up to the individual company or venue to set whether or not they make a distinction between domestic or international students but I am yet to find one that does. From Carnegie Hall: Buy your tickets at the Box Office on 57th Street and Seventh Avenue. A student photo ID is required for purchase of up to two tickets. which means that as ...


4

No, it isn't. Only very recently, as in the last decade, the Bachelor/Master structure on university was sort of normalised. Still European degrees are not automatically recognized Having said that, I wouldn't worry to much. Dealing with all these discrepancies at an early age is great preparation for life as an expat. If you worry, you could also ...


4

The system has changed since last I looked at the college education in Ukraine. But it would be better to check directly with a particular institution in Ukraine to determine the length. For example ХНУРЭ (Russian) states that they have a 4 year bachelor program, additional 1 year "specialist" or 1.5 years for "magister" or equivalent of US Masters program....


4

If you are interested in preparing an equivalence of your degree, you should get in touch with the Zentralstelle für ausländisches Bildungswesen (ZAB) which is the administration responsible for evaluating degrees earned in foreign countries: Die Zentralstelle für ausländisches Bildungswesen (ZAB) ist die zentrale Stelle für die Bewertung ausländischer ...


4

If she is 8 years old, that would put her at "Grundschule" (elementary school) levels in Bavaria. More specifically, in 2nd or 3rd grade, depending on month of birth and previous educational levels. Also a lot of elementary schools will have special courses for German as foreigners. During 4th grade, depending on her overall grades she can then choose a ...


4

There is no legal obstacle to this. In order to attend boarding school in the US, you need to first find a boarding school and apply for admission, which can be a very long process so you better start early. If you have lived outside the US for most of your life, you may be considered an international student for most school purposes, such as requiring an ...


3

I don't think the field is regulated. The page from the German Foreign Office is about requirements to obtain a regular work visa, and not about the general restrictions that apply to Germans and EU citizens alike. Access to the German job market is easier for people working in IT to the extent that they can qualify for an EU blue card with a lower salary. ...


3

Education in European countries before EU was pretty hectic and followed varied standards of education. This is a process undergoing changes still today as Education tries to meet some kind of EU suggested standards. Since some countries joined EU, there were many school reforms to try and normalise how children are taught. Poland, among the few european ...


3

Ukraine has apparently taken steps to become consistent with the Bologna Process, so if you are familiar with that, it means most universities will likely offer Bachelors and Masters programs, if not now, then in the near future. It might not be consistent yet across all institutions, so if you are thinking of a particular university, I would recommend ...


3

The best options we've encountered are truly international schools, where the local emphasis in curriculum is lessened. You can find Americanized schools in various countries, but that's not always going to be possible. International schools tend to focus on world history and International English, instead of mostly local history and local language (which ...


3

Your grade level placement will very much depend on what you have studied. In seeking admission to a US school, you'll present all of your school records. Those will be evaluated against what is required for US graduation with a standard diploma, you'll be given credit for subjects you've taken successfully in England, and you'll be placed accordingly, not ...


2

From my experience in a state accredited private University, as a foreign student I was not eligible for any financial aid or (of course) discount on tuition. Anything that required a student ID though is the same for everybody in my experience: foreign students are issued the same Student IDs as everybody else.


2

The easiest way to get around the problem is to get an International Student ID card. You have a lot of information in: http://www.isic.org/ They also connect you to sites that offer discounts. Quite useful.


2

he went to the Rotterdam International Secondary School (RISS) in the end. We arrived in October. He had to wait until after winter break for a spot. We tried Grotius College but they didn't feel comfortable with the short duration. And my son has some learning problems (suspected ADD, but never confirmed). We stopped hearing from the after going for ...


2

Less then a year is tough. As @Gala says for you 4 year old you are going to be okay. S/he will go to Group 1 or 2, which still could be considered pre-school. You might want to look for a school with a lot of bilingual children, so they could relate. My children (twins 5 yo) go to a school with a lot of bilingual children and it is fun to see how at their ...


2

The 4-year old should be fine and will probably pick up some Dutch easily (I have seen several do it) but I suspect it could be tougher for the 12-year old as schooling and school life are obviously in Dutch. I don't know anybody who did this but Grotius has something called an “Internationale schakelklas” which is intended precisely for older children who ...


2

The answer to this question depends a lot on the remaining time of your children's school career. If this is one time expat experience for a short time (max 2 years) going to an American school might have benefits. On the other hand you might alienate him/her from both countries. A school is not only a curriculum, it is a lot more then that. You also ...


2

In germany, computer science degree is required for a developer's blue card, however, it is not required for national visa (any recognized degree will work).


2

This link gives all the information about who can apply for a post grad work permit (PGWP). In general, it depends. If you are doing a program from a sketchy college, CIC just might reject your application and not issue a work permit at all. CIC takes all factors into consideration while issuing a work permit. These factors include but are not limited to: ...


2

Your own link to Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst, the German Academic Exchange Service, is under the auspices of the Federal Ministry of Education and Research. The 8700 Euro is an estimate, based on the average amounts students need to cover food, accommodation, transportation, books, and the like. Deutsches Studentenwerk confirms: In order to ...


2

First of I'm British and have moved back and forth to the Netherlands quite a few times now. Amsterdam is a mixed community and most areas are very friendly. Your child will probably just be starting secondary school. http://www.iamsterdam.com/en/local/move/dutch-education-system/secondary-school For information on Amsterdam there is an expatcenter where ...


2

NARIC is an independent organization with which the UK Government contracts on an open public tender basis for an external supplier to deliver the NARIC service (no affiliation). As with any such fee-based service outsourced by a government, it is elective, one of the options available. For those who wish to have their current qualifications evaluated, ...


2

I don't think it's too difficult to get a an IT job in Germany, or elsewhere in Europe, as long as you have experience in a platform or technology that's in high demand. I'm an American who's lived in Germany for 12 years. The first 9 years I worked for American IT companies (EDS, then HP), but when my company's contract ran out, I just moved to a German ...


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