The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.
13

As an EU citizen you are entitled to vote on both the European Parliamentary candidates and on the local/municipal elections. This is true for all EU countries, as it's part of the EU citizen voting rights (except if you are not in the country/EU when the election is happening, as in that case you might not be able to vote). You have to forfeit your ability ...


11

If you ever resided in the USA, you need to contact the state where you last resided. If you never resided in the USA, then this would depends on where your parents resided. This page describes the rules in details for those who never resided in the USA. I have reproduced them below. Process and rules varies from state to state. Some states are missing in ...


10

You may not, as a non-citizen of The Philippines, interfere with or meddle in any capacity in any election. The Philippine Bureau Of Immigration often reiterates this, as they did before the 2013 election: The Bureau of Immigration (BI) warned foreigners against extending support to candidates in the forthcoming national and local elections, lest ...


8

No, you are not a resident of The Hague if you live abroad. Note that you are only able to vote in national and EU¹ elections. You are not able to vote in next weeks municipal elections. All adult residents of The Hague are able to vote in The Hague's municipal elections. As you are not able to vote in the municipal elections, this logically means you ...


8

So while it differs a bit by province for foreigners historically, basically: In the federal elections and referendums: You may vote in this federal election if you: are a Canadian citizen will be 18 or older on election day are registered to vote with more information in the Canada Elections Act. As confirmation from another immigration page: ...


7

I have been called to jury duty while living abroad, and had to call them and tell them there was no way I could make it. It depends on how good the local systems are and how much they know. I have been selected for jury duty while abroad, and so have two of my siblings. In these cases it took a quick call to the county clerk to get things straightened ...


5

Yes, it's possible but as you suspected it does depend on your country of origin. For example, French people abroad can simply vote in their consulates, the same way than for other national elections. Their votes will then be added to one of the districts (namely Paris/Île-de-France). The modalities will depend on your citizenship (not all countries vote on ...


5

It depends on how long you've been overseas. from the AEC: if you're just visiting overseas for a short time, and plan to return, you can enrol and vote if you are already overseas, you can enrol to vote from overseas if you're enrolled, you can register as an overseas voter IF you intend to return to Australia within six years and the one most ...


5

The ties to German institutions abroad does not seem to be about German culture. The Goethe institute (and most of the others listed in the exceptions) are paid for by the German government. Basically, people who's job depends on who is the next chancellor and whether s/he deems this job worth paying for are considered "personally affected" by default. ...


4

You only are obliged to vote IF you register and are listed on the polls. EU expats must register to vote for EU elections If you qualify (See conditions on that page) then you can register, and if you register, then you're compelled to vote. If that's the case, then you will be required to vote in all of Belgium’s local elections too. Compulsory ...


4

No, for federal elections, if you reside outside the US, you vote in the place where you last resided; it is not necessary to maintain residence there. The Federal Voting Assistance Program has information at https://www.fvap.gov/citizen-voter. The State Department also has a page on the topic, which discusses eligiblity: Voting Eligibility Almost ...


3

Under EU law, you can indeed vote in the municipal and European elections. Beyond that, a few countries (Netherlands, Denmark, Malta, the UK) allow EU citizens to vote in some other local elections. British citizens can also vote in Ireland in some national elections (but not in referendums I think) and vice versa. France does not allow anything more than ...


3

I sent the same question to "I Vote NZ" (The official NZ Government Elections Facebook page) on facebook a week or two ago. My question: Are we eligible to vote while living outside of NZ? If so, how do we actually vote? Their response: Yes - as long as you're NZ citizens, over 18, and have been back to NZ within the past 3 years, then you're ...


3

No. Rules regarding eligibility to enrol to vote are uniform across Australia. Only Australian citizens can enrol and vote federal elections and referenda, and state and local government elections. The only exception is certain "eligible British subjects" who were already on the electoral roll on 26 January 1984.


3

When registering to vote in US elections This is a loaded statement. The US, and specifically UOCAVA, covers federal elections and not state elections. The page and instructions you link to cover both. You do not need to provide an employer to register to vote in VA for federal elections. The VA website provides a list of ways to be eligible for an ...


2

If I were you I would inform my local Electoral Registration Office of my change of address, note that the new address is not in the UK, and ask them to remove me from the electoral register, or, if that is not possible, at least to refrain from sending anything to me at the old address.


2

As suggested in a comment by audionuma, the Mexican Embassy in London does indeed have information about this. The page for voters residing abroad does not appear to have a version in English, but judging from the items under "¿CÓMO VOTAR?" ("how to vote?"), the process comprises four steps. The relevant items are: ¿Cómo registrarse? (how to register) ...


2

According to the (pdf) register-by-mail application, it asks about when and where you last registered. The main UK government website, Register to vote has an online application process as well. For either process, you will need both your National Insurance number and your passport details.


2

It's your inhabited last address in the US before you moved. IIRC it is used to determine your residency, and to make sure that your vote goes to the right state/county/whatever. Source


2

Without doubt, the cheapest way forward is UK citizenship. If you have a look at the BBC article Where is the cheapest place to buy citizenship you will find the cheapest country listed is Dominica - starting at $100,000 USD plus fees. It's a commonwealth country, and thus fits your requirements on everything other than cost. Generally, though, you're ...


1

While voting is, as you said, mandatory, it is not actively being prosecuted. You will normally not suffer any consequences if you do not vote. There is no prosecution; the courts have other priorities. You will certainly not get a crime record. If it does go to court, it is dealt with by the Justice of the Peace, which deals with trivial matters (neighbours ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible