22

I'm an IT worker (software dev / test automation). I moved to Australia last year. Seek.com.au is the biggest jobs site (disclaimer: I'm contracting there at present). If you create a profile on there, it'll go a long way - recruiters will also contact you as a result of your profile being active and searchable. For random 'spot jobs', Spotjobs is up and ...


11

You're not accepting payment for work, you're accepting reimbursement for your expenses. You are allowed to look for a job while on F1 visa, you're not allowed to actually work.


10

It's certainly possible to arrange employment before arriving in your new country, although employers are likely to want to meet you in person before actually extending an offer (particularly if the position is not a remote working position). Before moving to New Zealand some years ago, I had located a job offer on one of the job web sites, and did a ...


10

I run a small company, but IANAL, as always. One thing is for sure: if you want to work within your daily allowance, your employer has to give you work. If they cannot (because they are searching for work for you), this cannot count against you. Germany has "Beschäftigungspflicht" (duty of employment) - your employer actually has to provide the work agreed ...


10

In principle, you could face a fine of up to 200,000 yen (that's in the same category as, for example, not carrying your residence card when you go out); in practice I have never heard of anybody who was fined for this. In any case, you do not face imprisonment or deportation (that would have been the case if you had made a false notification, as opposed to ...


9

fkraiem has already provided a fantastic answer, I just want to add my personal experience. Yesterday I notified the Immigration Bureau of Japan via their e-system. They said on their site that additional inquiry will be made if deemed necessary. However, I've received an email today which only said that my notification has been recorded. I guess I'm clear ...


8

As far as I know there is no guideline that requires an employer to provide you bereavement leave either paid or unpaid. In the US Government provides 3 days leave for death of a relative as results of wounds but private employers are not required to abide by this but generally have some sort of policy for such situation, so I would get with the Human ...


6

Your understanding is incorrect. To legally work in the US you need a proper immigration status. If you don't have a US citizenship or permanent resident status (green card) - you need an immigration status that allows free employment. Since you're working for a Canadian employer, located in Canada - you won't be able to get neither H1b nor TN. You'll need ...


6

The reason they are not willing to sponsor you for PR is that they can find employees who are as good (or better) for the job, but do not come with such requirement. Generally speaking for an employer to go the extra mile for a potential employee, there either must be a shortage or that candidate must be extraordinary. I understand that this may not be ...


6

Leaving the company does not, in itself, affect the petition -- people can be petitioned while not in the US and not working for the petitioner, as long as the petitioner intends to employ the immigrant after they immigrate. However, most companies will withdraw the I-140 after you leave the company. If the I-140 is withdrawn before your I-485 has been ...


6

What you have is a non-immigrant visa that allows you to enter Thailand. If you do not use it, it simply expires. A non-immigrant B visa is not an "employment visa". It is a visa that allows you to enter Thailand sponsored by a company. If you had taken the job, then upon your arrival in Thailand, you would have been required to apply for a work permit ...


5

Another thing you could do is to read through your employment contract as well as the so called "Betriebsvereinbarungen" - rules that apply for all employes. There should be stated how those hours are handled. Some companies, especially in service sector let you accumulate positive or negative hours up to a certain level. It lets the company to use the time, ...


5

Would this include working remotely for a foreign employer whilst being paid into a foreign account? Yes. You're not allowed to work in the US, not for a US employer. You'll get your EAD within 3 months, most likely.


5

If the country is a member of the 1954 UN Convention Relating to the Status of Stateless Persons they have to follow the rules of that convention. Read it, and you will know what is required by their laws. BUT, not all member countries have created a formal stateless recognition process so you could end up in a bit of limbo. You can contact the UNHCR ...


5

You remain in H1b status for 60 days after leaving the job, unless your I-94 expires sooner (in which case you will remain in status until the I-94 expires). Furthermore, as you have a pending I-485, you can stay in the US regardless of whether you have status or not (unless your I-485 is denied). If you find a company that will sponsor H1b for you, you can ...


4

I think your best option is to apply to Arbeitlosengeld 2, a.k.a Hartz IV. Basically you apply for some money that should cover for your living expenses + your daughter + health insurance for the three of you. As far as I know, you can ask for it independently from whether you hold an university degree or not. Nevertheless, I strongly encourage you to find ...


4

I lived in Singapore for some years until 2009. Things might have changed since, and I am not a US citizen, but I will try to answer some of your questions to the best of my knowledge. [Edits by LCR. I lived in Singapore 27 years and only left in Dec 2015.] I would say that it is relatively easy to emigrate to Singapore, if you can find a job there, ...


4

So, in short, you don't have a contract. Only in very rare situation verbal agreement can be binding, and it is usually not the case with work contracts. There is no way your verbal agreement with the GM can be considered binding. I guess in your situation your best bet would be to just show up and ask for the actual contract and position, either with HR, ...


4

Incorporate back home (in India) and treat every sale of a product as and export from India and import into US No, you cannot do it while you're on H1b. You'd be breaking the law. Working for an employer other than your petitioner, even if it is yourself, is illegal. Move to Chile or Canada which have much simpler immigration policies for startups . ...


4

The best solution for Australia is to apply for General Skilled Migration, which gives you (provisional) permanent residence. However, it's a long and arduous path, especially after the recent clampdown on "abuse" of the system: you can't even apply directly anymore, you need to submit an "expression of interest" and wait to get invited to apply. Even when ...


4

Answering my own question to say what happened. Since I was only planning to stay in Germany for marginally more than 90 days, the Ausländeramt just gave me a Grenzübertrittbescheinigung that lets me stay until the end of the term at the institute I'm visiting. (This is less paperwork hassle and certainly cheaper than getting either a work permit or a long-...


4

You have an unrestricted EAD, so you are authorized to do any kind of employment (including self-employment) in the US, as far as immigration is concerned. Of course, if you earn any income, make sure to report it on your taxes. As for whether someone in general can teach children math in an apartment, that is a separate question. Perhaps your apartment ...


4

This is a very partial answer, because while I live in the Netherlands, all of my labor law experience is knowledge is from a different state and legal culture (Israel). Still, it might be useful to you. You must at least reply. Regardless of whether you reach the conclusion that you owe them the money, or reach the conclusion that you don't owe it (or owe ...


4

For this duration, you would need to register in Norway and become a member of Norwegian social security. This would normally also mean that you would need to pay taxes in Norway. As the taxes in Norway are higher than in the US, this does normally imply that you do not need to pay taxes in the US for the duration of your stay. I think that it would be the ...


4

tl;dr: Talk to your employer and ask for an Auflösungsvertrag. Regarding the maximum consequences, there are the one month gross salary penalty your contract mentions any damages your employer decides to claim from you (and is able to defend in court eventually & recover from you). Worst case scenario, you are a crucial employee on an important project ...


3

There are a few possibilities: You might still be deported to the US. It's more complicated and would require the consent of the US but I remember that the website of the State department suggested it does still happen even after you renounce your citizenship. Not sure about the details. You might get a residence permit just like any other non-national, ...


3

New Zealand has a special sort of Skilled Migrant Worker programme, where you can apply for a visa, and if it's approved, you can come live in NZ and then start looking for work: http://www.immigration.govt.nz/migrant/stream/work/skilledmigrant/default.htm Wouldn't be surprised if Australia had the same thing.


3

You do need a German residence permit (or a long-stay visa and/or authorization to work, as appropriate). As a U.S. citizen, you can apply for it from within the country but you are not allowed to work without it. In general, a Finnish residence permit does not make any difference in this scenario. In particular, it does not grant you any right you don't ...


3

There are two issues here: K-1 is a single-entry visa, so you will not have a valid U.S. visa after entering. So if you leave the U.S. you will need a new visa (paying the fee again) to enter. (Plus, if you're married at that point, you won't qualify for a K-1 visa, so the only way to immigrate would be through Consular Processing abroad.) The only ...


3

From the USCIS: After admission, your fiancé(e) may immediately apply for permission to work by filing a Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization with the USCIS Service Center having jurisdiction over your place of residence. Any work authorization based on a nonimmigrant fiancé (e) visa would be valid for only 90 days after entry. However, ...


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