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You should get a lawyer guiding you through this. You can pay one, I'm sure there are organisations to help you if you cannot afford one (probably the default if you arrive as a refugee). You will need to explain your matter more clearly. Right now as a layman, I cannot see a reason for asylum. Surely, robbery, assault or murder is neither legal nor covered ...


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Disclaimer: I have never had to deal with US Taxes. For me, listening to such stories and general reading about this topic is like watching a vampire horror movie on television - knowing that they will never get out of the screen. I do remember statements being made that corrections to an existing tax return can be made. The advice generaly given was ...


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Your passport's data page (the page with your picture) displays an entry for "Autorità/Authority/Autorité." As noted in the comments below, the entry there is likely to display "Ministro Degli Affari Esteri," the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, as the issuing governmental agency. The Passport itself does not say where (physically) the passport was ...


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In theory the proper order of action for you is: Fill out the Change of Status form (you are unlikely to get any acknowledgement that it was received so keep a copy for yourself and send it signed for) Apply for pre-settled status (perhaps after you get notification that the form was signed for) In practice the whole ordeal is a shambles and it might go ...


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Yes, as a EU Citizen you are required to fulfill local registration laws (where they exist) that applies to all residents. see also answer to Having multiple residences at law.stackexchange In the European Union, Residence Laws are national laws only for periods up to 3 months are there generel EU Laws Belgium: Moving to Belgium | Belgium.be ...


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The normal case for a parent joining a child is that the parent must be the child's dependant. That is the explicit provision of the directive (2004/38/EC, article 2(2)(d)). Since your son is 16, and you are his carer, that is clearly not the case here. There are court cases that create a right for the carer of a minor EU citizen to join the EU citizen in ...


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Mark Johnson's answer is essentially correct. The income you're speaking of is not likely to be interest income, but the same principle applies: you can file an amended return. To answer the questions posed in the body of the text: Should I have mentioned that I own stock in the company I work for? Since the tax is an income tax, you do not need to ...


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In the case of Sweden, the agreement is that someone residing in Sweden but with income from Germany pays taxes in Sweden on that income, but the german taxes is deducted from the ones payable in Sweden. The rule is that you don't need to pay taxes two times on the same income. I suggest that you contact the Skattecenter in Köpenhavn. http://skat.dk/


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... will my marriage be valid? Almost certainly. Different countries have different conditions for recognizing marriages concluded under foreign law. Generally they are recognized, though in some cases they might not be. For example, a country that does not allow first cousins to marry may or may not recognize a marriage between first cousins performed ...


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The main general rule is that you are taxed on where you are living unless there are extra considerations, including for example bilateral agreements of the countries involved. Since this can get confusing and complex very quickly the two most common solutions for this problem I usually see are: If the company has a subsidiary, a sister-company, or ...


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Unemployment is an insurance for which you make contributions to (mostly based on your salary), thus payments from that insurance will be paid out from the (mostly national) organisation. Your income tax is paid where you earn your income. For cross borders workers (working in one country but living in another) things become complicated in the area of ...


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As as EU citizen you are granted the right to live and work inside the EU wherever you see fit. So yes, this is legally possible. However, you need the right paperwork. For taxes, you need to consult a tax accountant locally. For your working contract you need to make sure it's all in order, i.e. the address is correct. As for insurances you need to figure ...


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I think it means the place where it's been physically issued to you, so it can be any country other than Italy, otherwise they wouldn't have put the option to begin with if every Italian passport was issued in Italy only. If you've been issued your passport in the UK, just put UK, Indian officials would know anyway that there are consulates, I don't think ...


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Such things aren't required of EU citizens. Your 2003 Dutch textbook was written before Directive 2004/38/EC was enacted, and the law in the Netherlands was different then. I was living in Amsterdam at the time, and I had an English colleague who was stopped by a police officer for crossing the street away from a pedestrian crossing and told that he had to ...


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Where local residence laws exist, the other EU-Citizens must comply with these laws just as local EU-Citizens must. For 3rd Country Citizens registration requirements may exist that do not apply to EU-Citizens (mostly matters pertaining to their residence permit). Other EU-Citizens may (but are not required to) apply for a residence card, which fulfills a ...


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First, there are two kinds of registration here. One is the registration of your residence with the municipality, which some states do not have. For example, there is no such registration in the UK. This registration is the reason for saying "some EU countries require you to report your presence here to the relevant authorities within a reasonable period ...


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Summary: A layman reading of Home Office guidance / Immigration Rules indicates that you will receive the pre-settled status from the date of approval should the application be successful. However, for the purpose of qualifying for the settled status, the time of continuous residence begins from the date when you first arrived in the UK, assuming no gaps are ...


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The renunciation process requires you to be caught up on your US tax obligation, which may mean filing up to 8 tax returns at one time as well as the Foreign Bank Account Reports. The actual steps to renounce your citizenship and the number of returns required can vary based on the rules in your local US embassy, so it's recommended that you speak with ...


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Last time I checked, there is a hefty “exit fee” in addition to the paperwork. Might be easier to read the U.S./France* tax treaty and avoid any type of income that USA can tax. Or stay out of USA and don’t make enough for them to bother requesting extradition. *If you plan to live outside of France, you’d have to read three tax treaties.


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Unfortunately, I have not had time to look into this in more detail, but here are some thoughts that may be of use: I had intended to register as resident here on the basis of full-time employment that will begin on 18 July. I took along my signed employment contract as evidence of this, but was told that they couldn't process it on this basis because I ...


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Yes. She should apply for an EEA family permit, or, if you are already registered under the settlement scheme, an EU settlement scheme family permit. The possible grounds for refusal are few. The most likely problem you'll face is the suspicion of a marriage of convenience.


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That also coincides with the maximum 90 days (in a 180-day period) that non-EU/EEA/Swiss nationals on a short-stay Schengen visa are generally meant to stay in the Schengen area without applying for a longer-term visa/residence permit. The 90/180 rule does not apply to family members of EU citizens. This is true regardless of whether you have a pending ...


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Each country makes its own rules within the guidelines specified in the free movement directive, so a general answer is not possible. Residence permits are not required, however, because under the free movement scheme, member states cannot require citizens of other member states to have a residence permit. The citizen may opt to apply for a "registration ...


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Citizenship of the European Union is granted by the member states of the European Union according to their national laws. That is, any citizen of a member state is automatically also a citizen of the EU, and there is no way to be a citizen of the EU other than by having the citizenship of a member state. The UK generally requires you to reside in the UK ...


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If your "residence card" says that it is the residence card of a family member of an EU citizen, then it is an "article 10" card, and you might be able to travel to Portugal without a visa. If it doesn't say that, then you will need a Schengen visa to go to Portugal. To travel to Portugal without a visa, by virtue of an article 10 card, you must be ...


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The EEA family permit does not authorize you to be in the UK. You have that right by automatic operation of law. So you do not need to leave the UK when the EEA family permit expires. April is another question, since it is possible that the UK might leave the EU without a deal before then. If there is a deal, or if the UK's departure from the EU is ...


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The answer to your question depends on a couple of things. The first is the definition of EEA national at regulation 2: “EEA national” means— (a) a national of an EEA State who is not also a British citizen; or (b) a national of an EEA State who is also a British citizen and who prior to acquiring British citizenship exercised a right to ...


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Yes, but it would be a bit tricky. First of all, the Finnish residence permit has no power in Ireland because Ireland isn't in Schengen. But there is a way. You, as a EU citizen, should move into Ireland and declare Irish residence to tax purposes. Then, your spourse might apply for an Irish residence permit. It is Stamp 4EUFam for the case. The details


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