17

Would there it be a problem in this case? No. EU countries aren't supposed to stamp EU passports, so virtually no Italian (or other EU citizen) leaving France (or other Schengen country) has any record of when they last entered France or the Schengen area. I would like to assume the pickiest immigration officer possible. If your Italian citizenship comes ...


6

It's a lot easier from a legal standpoint. EU freedom of movement applies in Switzerland and the main requirement to obtain a work permit is simply having a job offer. Employers are free to hire any EU citizen without having to justify this choice. By contrast, employers must prove that they could not find anyone locally before hiring a third-country ...


6

The way EU law is structured, EU citizens cannot really “overstay” and technicalities like that should not have an incidence on your right to reside in another EU country. Think of it as being late on some paperwork rather than overstaying, that would be closer to the truth. If registering is mandatory (as it is in Denmark) and the host state wants to apply ...


5

Under Section 212 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (or I.N.A.) you are very clearly inadmissible as the possible sentence exceeded one year. In theory you could apply for a so called 212(d)(3) nonimmigrant waiver but your chances are extremely low because you committed the crime less than 15 years ago (except in a case of prostitution for which there ...


5

Your reasoning hinges on the notion that parents are necessarily household members. On a purely formal level, it's not the case, it's an additional material requirement thus explicitely ruling out family reunification with parents qua parents. You wrote: That way, I think, the majority of the parents would anyway qualify for residence even if they are in no ...


3

Can I get Pre-settled status in the UK while still living in the US? No. Settled status is essentially a "grandfathering" system to enable EU citizens to retain rights of free movement after the UK leaves the free movement system. As such, it is only available to EU citizens who reside in the UK. I would like to move back to the UK before ...


3

As an American living in Germany and working in Switzerland, I can address some of these: Permit As an EU citizen you can get a work permit in Switzerland. But there's a priority system for employment in Switzerland: Swiss citizens EU citizens Other citizens The company that employs you has to be able to show evidence that they couldn't find a Swiss ...


3

The sentence doesn't suggest that different rules apply. To naturalize as an Irish citizen, you need to have resided in the country legally for five years. That's the requirement. Due to the EU freedom of movement and related legislation, EU citizens do not need permission to reside in Ireland and do not get stamps on their passport. Therefore it doesn't ...


3

No, this is not true. See the information from the Citizens' Information Board. You may have been confused by the five-year residence period that leads to the right of permanent residence, or perhaps by the transition period that EU countries may apply to the nationals of countries newly joining the EU (although I don't remember whether Ireland imposed such ...


3

It would not directly help your visa application. Under EU law, your freedom of movement rights are derived from those of your spouse: if she (wants to) live in Switzerland, you have the right to join her. That means for example that if she gets a job in Switzerland, you automatically qualify for a visa/residence permit that does allow you to work in ...


3

No, you cannot. That would be a big breach of all kinds of privacy laws. What you can do is give the name of the account holder when you transfer the money. Then the bank should reject it when you put in "John Doe" but the account is registered to "Regina Miller". But they will never give you the data. (Just for the record, IBAN accounts ...


2

After a long while, I would like to add my answer to this question. While Relaxed's answer is excellent from the theoretical point of view, I feel I should add a little bit more on the "practical" side, more or less in accordance with tobltobs' answer. In practice, unless you are a top-level manager with years of experience or a really valuable ...


2

Like Relaxed already said, it is a lot easier. There are contingents for third-country working permits. Besides that those contingents are quite small, smaller companies usually do not have the experience to make use of those contingents. Even for bigger companies, you would need to have some heavily sought-after qualifications.


2

In situations like the one you explain there are three countries and jurisdictions involved: Home country (H): The country which nationality you have. Residence / work country (R): The country you live and work in de facto Client's country (C): The country where the company which employs you or contracts you has its seat In your case: H = Portugal, R = ...


1

Not meant to be a complete answer but is probably longer than what the comment section allows. One small consideration is that time spending on Ci does not count towards the requirement to obtain a permanent residence permit (type C) and therefore may affect the time needed to acquire citizenship. Only time spent on B or L permits for non-temporary purposes (...


1

The law (Wet Studiefinanciering 2000) is not super explicit but does provide that several categories of foreign residents are to be treated like Dutch student as far as tuition is concerned. Several universities explicitely mention residence cards for members of the family of an EU citizen (familielid EU/EER) as one of these categories (e.g. WUR, Maastricht)....


1

To live in Switzerland you need a residence permit, not a visa. As an Italian you can freely travel to Switzerland for the purpose of tourisme of short business visits, and your family can accompany you. Normally you will not even encounter passport control when crossing the border. But to live in Switzerland you will need to get a residence permit. And for ...


1

You MUST be living in the UK on December 31st, 11pm (which is 12pm in the rest of the EU). I would strongly recommend being there a week earlier or better two, in case some jobsworth tries to find a reason to claim you were not actually living there. I wouldn't trust them not to try that. Rent a room from your son for that time and pay him rent (or rent from ...


1

For the status as a non-EU family member, dependency is the main keyword that must be fulfilled. As to whether another form of residence permit is possible, where you serve as a financial sponsor, is something you must ask the Maltese authoraties directly since it would based solely on Maltese national laws. Registering your non-EU family members in another ...


1

It's interesting to see the suggestions of Bulgaria, Russia, and the United States when the OP is clearly asking about South and Central America and a Spanish-speaking country. As a Latina, I would tell you that South America would be a great choice. Your number one option should be Ecuador- a very beautiful country with USDs as official currency. And ...


1

Electrical wiring in a typical UK home is different from Continental Europe. Electrical outlets (sockets) are on a ring final circuit and normally rated at 13 A each. Instead of fuses for individual outlets or groups of outlets, in a fuse box (consumer unit), every plug is fused. Every appliance made for the UK market contains a fuse of max 13 A in the plug. ...


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