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27

For a general idea, I recommend this formula: CurrentSalary EUR * (EUR/USD Rate) * CostOfLivingIndexValue of SF or NY. If you make 50k EUR, that's about 70k USD as of March 2014 (with EUR = 1.39 USD). SF and NY are about 1.6 times more expensive than the average urban city in the US, so you would need $112k. This doesn't really take into account ...


18

There's a lot more to tax residence in most countries than a simple time limit. For Germany, for example, there are other specific triggers, other than the 6 consective month rule. One would be having an abode in Germany. Covered in reasonable detail in this KPMG report (pdf). Tax residence generally implies you have to pay tax to that country on your ...


16

Of course, the salaries you're talking about here are gross (as in pre-tax), so obviously first step would be to calculate net salary. In US you have to components of the income tax, first the federal tax, then in some cases state tax (California is one of these states, and actually has the highest state tax of all). BTW. what's generally called net income ...


15

No. Right now you get a visa, which gives you right to live and work in one particular country. There are plans to change that using EU Blue Card scheme (see also in Wikipedia), but it has not been yet fully implemented. And even so, at this point it's not 100% clear that it will implement freedom of relocation between member states. If the country you'...


14

Wikipedia has an excellent article about these regions. The French DOM and Saint-Martin are part of the EU (albeit outside Schengen) and EU citizens can settle there without restriction. The Azores, Madeira and the Canary islands have a similar status. Together they are called “outermost regions” and EU law, including the free movement of persons, applies ...


14

There are several costs involved in sending money internationally. For a large amount, the most significant of these is the exchange rate. At a bank, there is usually a 2-3% "spread" on the "interbank rate" (the middle rate you see quoted on sites like xe.com, Yahoo, Google). This means that if (for example) the interbank rate gives you 1.4 USD when you ...


13

If your spouse moves to an EU country under EU rules (except Poland because in this case national rules take precedence) then you would be entitled to a residence permit as well and you could work in the same country without restrictions. Getting a spousal permit is therefore generally much easier than getting a work visa on your own, at least if you are ...


12

I do not exactly understand what you want to know, if you want to estimate the salary you need or you can expect in the US (which are 2 different things). But I can still give you clues about the differences of budget between these two situations. I spent some time in SF and live in France. The things I noticed when it comes to comparing salaries and ...


12

As an Italian citizen, you do not need a working visa for the Netherlands, as it is also in the European Union: All EU/EEA or Swiss citizens, with the exception of Croatians, are entitled to work without restriction in all sectors and industries. The same holds true for the UK, where you need neither a visa nor a work permit. This is linked to the ...


12

What's for me the best option for paying taxes? On time, preferably electronically. That would be the best option. I'm not going to spend more than 3 months in 1 country. That means you'll have to pay taxes to at least 4 different countries at any give year... I suggest you talk to tax advisers familiar with the relevant countries' tax laws to plan ...


11

As @vartec explained it's not generally the case. There are several ways non-EU nationals can gain a right to reside elsewhere in the EU: The EU blue card is an attempt at creating an EU residence card for some categories of migrants. It has not been fully implemented and does not cover all EU countries. In any case, it's a new residence permit on top of ...


11

I'd keep it simple. And either.. 1) Apply for an EU Blue Card (gives most advantages) 2) Start your own company (allows lots of geographic flexibility for assignments) The EU Blue Card gives you full flexibility in terms of mobility (not needing to re-apply for each country for work permits), whereas starting your own company lets you sidestep the labour ...


11

Working permits are still national matters in the EU and your German working permit does not allow you to work in Luxembourg. To the extent that your internship counts as work, you would therefore need some form of authorization from Luxembourg. For less than 90 days, you can however travel to and stay in Luxembourg on the basis of your German residence ...


10

Each country where you are working, contracting or residing might try to tax some or all of your income based on the local rules and those are not fully unified even in the European Union. Worse case scenario, you could be taxed several times for the same income. Some countries like the US will also want a bite at the apple as long as you are a citizen, no ...


10

Q: What happens if someone works in 10 countries to his retirement? If they happen to be 10 EU countries, then in the last country that person worked in he should apply for pension and get pension combined from all the countries he worked in. As Europa.eu portal explains, if you've worked in several EU countries, you may have accumulated pension rights in ...


10

EU countries no longer require residence permits of EU nationals. Per Directive 2004/38/EC as explained on the Europarl Fact Sheet: Residence permits are abolished for Union citizens; however, Member States may require them to register with the competent authorities." Member States may still require you register for a National ID Number of some sort, ...


10

One way to handle this is to answer in a more general way than with specific facts. Where are you from? I'm from the Middle East. Or, you can refer to a more general timeframe, implying that you left your country of origin a while ago: Where are you from? I grew up in Syria. You can even embellish this with words that describe your new situation: ...


10

TL;DR The UK will most likely remain a member of the EU until at least 2018, potentially leaving the bloc 29 March 2019 11pm UK time. All of the current EU/EEA laws still apply until that date. No one really knows what will happen afterwards. The government has set up a newsletter for EU citizens living in the UK, which you can join to get updates, ...


9

Gaël Laurans already did a good job explainig the generics, I'll add some UK specific information. First of all, the government has a page on how to claim the State Pension when you are living abroad. Depending on when you were born you might need to have enough UK NI contribution years to be able to claim at least some pension. I couldn't find a full table ...


9

If the people involved are family or friends, you could perhaps pay something for them. For example, you could add a credit to a prepaid account they have in the US (where permitted), buy them an online-only prepaid visa card, or buy them an emailed Amazon US gift card, using your EU credit or debit card. In other words, pay for something online they would ...


9

The EU directive is somewhat vague about that and the details are left to each individual participating state. In Germany, the relevant statute is the Aufenthaltsgesetz (“Residence act”). My reading of article 19 is that you do not need a degree in the exact same field (outside of regulated professions of course). But you do need some recognised higher ...


8

Here is how much a hypothetical above average (1.5x) software developer could save/invest after expenses and taxes in New York and Berlin. I think it is important to also include what your level of spending is, since this can greatly influence the amount you can invest for later. Be aware that this kind of calculation naturally comes with a lot of caveats ...


8

In the European Union, there are strict regulations considering health insurance: You have to be health insured (remember that in unemployment stage, most governments pay your basic health insurance). If you are employed in any country, you have to be insured in such country. If you are employed in more, you can choose any of them. However, the regulations ...


8

No, being a UK resident does not grant you the right to work in (or reside or even simply visit) Germany (see also Does a non-EU citizen residing in one EU country need to apply for a visa to move to another EU country for work?). The EU freedom of movement applies mostly to EU citizens and only indirectly to non-EU citizens. So your options to join your ...


8

I would be inclined to appeal, though I say that without enough awareness of the associated costs, so I can't actually recommend one way or the other whether you should appeal or reapply. The refusal strikes me as scandalous. Consider the guidance for evaluating your application under which the entry clearance operator was working (emphasis added): EUN2....


8

We reapplied for EEA Family permit and my wife got the visa this time in 20 days approximately. I followed the guidelines from above answers by @gnasher729 and @phoog. I reapplied for my wife using our previous documents and this time I submitted more documents to prove our communication. I took screenshots from my mobile phone from applications that we ...


8

As the same gross salary can and will result in very different net payments to the employee, it does not make much sense to discuss salaries in 'net'. In any job description or offer, and in most discussions, salaries mentioned are therefore gross values. It depends of course of the circumstances - a job that somebody currently has results in a well defined ...


8

Yes, normally they can tell that the license is exchanged because there is a mention at the back, on the bottom part, (at the very least, for the new, credit-card format licenses) with a code indicating the country that originally issued the license. It looks a bit like this on my exchaned French license (my own picture, I deleted out some details, but I ...


7

It is the Regulation (EC) No 883/2004 that is relevant here. In principle the workland principle applies. These means that social security from the country where you work is relevant. When you are unemployed it is the social security of the homeland that applies. As @gael already mentioned there is an allowed period where you can live abroad to seek work: ...


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