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9

What an interesting challenge! I looked at the CNN article, which mentioned "Counselor" Antonio Tedeschi. The word "Counselor" sounds like the position held by a local government official. There were too many towns to review, so I searched for the region "Molise," which might be similar to what we know as a county, and could explain how the offer could ...


7

While Iceland is not a member of EU, it participates in the EU Single Market through its membership of the European Economic Area. One consequence of that is that freedom of movement for workers applies to Iceland and Icelanders in the same way as to the EU proper. An EU citizen has the right to live and work in Iceland indefinitely without prior permission ...


6

I prefer the layered approach. One advantage is flexibility. As it is rainy, you'll want your outer layer to be waterproof, or at least water resistant. I prefer thin woolen underwear. Silk or synthetic base layers are also effective. I like the wool because it tends to smell a lot better and require far less frequent washing. It is also somewhat warmer ...


6

In the US divorce is a matter for state law, but generally it is possible to divorce in the US if your spouse lives at a US address at the time the divorce is filed. It is often possible to divorce in the US even if your spouse has moved overseas, though some states may restrict this to uncontested divorces. If your marriage certificate is not in English you ...


4

If you haven't forgotten or misunderstood anything, I don't see any reason to worry. In actual fact, even entry denials are not recorded or shared across EU countries. You would get a stamp in your passport and that would be all. There is no “passport record” where this information would be recorded, at least no Europe-wide record or database (conceivably ...


4

You would not be covered by local health insurance in the EU country you will visit solely on the basis of citizenship. EU-wide coverage is based on reciprocity (if you are insured in one EU country, then you are covered, under certain conditions, during visits to the others) but you need to qualify in the first place and that typically requires being a ...


4

In addition to layering mentioned in the other answers, I have a couple of extra tips (a finn, used to -20-30 C): Protect extremities well. You can have a good jacket and trousers, but if you forget about the fragile bits, it won't help that much. You can find gloves designed especially for cycling in cold (extra padding) that may be worth a look. Get ...


4

The following is copied from my own answer on Travel SE. I grew up in Norway. I've gone skiing, running, walking, playing, hiking, bicycling, etc. in the mountains there and in temperatures as cold as around -20 Celsius as a part of my childhood and youth. The single best tip I can give you is to wear wool. There is nothing like wool to keep you warm in a ...


4

The utility company might do one or more of several things, depending on the size of the debt: Write off the debt Chase you for the money Pass the debt to a debt collection agency Obtain a court judgement in your absence Something else Whatever they elect to do, they will note your default on their records, and notify any credit reference agencies they ...


3

Time: Almost every country in the Schengen area requires at least 5 years of residence to become a permanent resident, so I'd say time-wise you can choose any country you want. Language: easiest to learn is arguably Dutch, assuming you already speak English. Spanish is also not that hard and widely useful around the world. Ease of getting a job: the richer ...


3

I cannot comment on very specific clothing, but here is my experience. I moved from a climate similar to coastal one you mention, to Canada. Now I walk to and from work all year long, from +30 in the Summer to -30 and even -40 in the Winter. The specific clothing that works for you, you'll have to find. What I learned after a while, is what I need to wear ...


3

Somehow I managed to turn up good information. I found a Dutch government website about importing cats or dogs from third countries (not EU) into the Netherlands. It discusses requirements on whether the animal is coming from a low-risk- or high-risk-for-rabies country. I will extract just the last few notes from the high-risk section which is what ...


3

For the bank account, you should decide if you want someone to talk to. A lot of people end up with Deutsche Bank initially, because they needed a special type of account to get their visa that only Deutsche Bank provides. But they are also expensive later on. The normal bank account you need for your salary is called Girokonto. There are banks that provide ...


3

No, you are only covered if you contribute to the health insurance in an EU country. In Poland, this is The monthly contribution rate for health insurance is 9% of the assessment base. In the case of obligatory participation, the assessment base is equal to the individual's gross income decreased by the employee’s part of social security contributions. In ...


3

One option I'm trying to avoid, but which should work, is: Take a type-F extension chord. Cut the male side (i.e. the plug end of it). Tool: Heavy wire cutter. Open up the cable somewhat. Tool: Utility knife. Expose the 3 wires' copper. Tool: Careful work with a utility knife or wire exposre tool + pulling. Buy a self-assembly Type-H plug at a hardware ...


3

Caveat: I'm answering on the basis of common sense and general life experience, not specific knowledge. The IND is the relevant body which approves your request of an MVV, not the embassy. So, if the request is approved - it's an IND decision, and the embassy certainly can't overrule it, certainly not on grounds such as "MVV recipient doesn't have a Master'...


3

If you can get Argentine citizenship, you will be a citizen of a Schengen Annex II (visa waiver) country. This will allow you to travel to the Schengen area, but not to work there. An application for a work permit would look at your particular circumstances, your citizenship would be relatively less important than for travel.


2

Most PC power supplies nowadays can take a wide range of voltages, without the need for a manual switch. For example, the HP Z420 workstation cites an operating voltage range of 90–269 VAC, and a rated voltage range of 100-240 VAC. (Importantly for the Japanese case, it can also take both 50 and 60 Hz AC.) If your computer's from one of the big OEMs, this ...


2

You have two options: Use your PC as is with an external 110-to-220V transformer. Straightforward, but make sure the transformer's wattage is sufficient for your PC and that it's a high-quality model suitable for extended use. (Cheap, underpowered ones have a disturbing tendency to catch fire if overloaded for long periods of time.) Replace your PC's ...


2

This is just my opinion and you can easily get a half dozen useful answers. The banking laws are very strict in Deutschland. Go for a bank that has European branches as well as branches throughout Germany and you should be ok for travel, exchange rates, ATM availability and that sort of thing. Have some cash on hand to deposit into your account when you ...


2

After five years of uninterrupted living in Belgium, citizens from the European Union (EU), the European Economic Area (EEA – EU plus Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway) and Switzerland acquire permanent residence automatically. Non-EU/EEA/Swiss citizens are also eligible after five years but must submit an application with their local municipality for ...


2

If you did need a visa, it would be rather too late at this point. Fortunately, you do not need one. Your passport and residence card should suffice, but it won't hurt for you to bring a marriage certificate as well. If you do not have your marriage certificate, you can bring any other evidence of your marriage, but you probably won't need it, and it is ...


2

It's likely you're not so much cold as dry. Something people from Mediterranean coastal climates don't realize is just how dry the air gets when the temperature falls below freezing. Try wearing a scarf, a ski mask, or something else with a loose weave that you can pull over your mouth and nose. At first, it will feel funny breathing through it, but it ...


2

You might get a tax refund, as I did when I returned. And then it will be very difficult for you to get that money to you if you do not have a local bank account. If you are sure of not getting any tax refunds in future, go ahead by closing the account.


2

Germany §60 SGB II Mitwirkungs- und Mitteilungspflicht Requirment to cooperate and to report in Based on this social law and your specific conditions, you are required to report in to your case manager, when requested, to report about your progress and efforts or anything else required in a letter that may have been sent. Often the next date is set ...


2

Indeed, VFS seems to be mistaken. The Luxembourg government mentions travel insurance and transportation tickets or reservations only for short-term visa applicants. Perhaps you should complain to VFS using the details on their contact page before you submit the application.


1

I still have my Dutch bank account even though I have not lived there for 5 years. My wife and I still own a house there and my sister in law lives there so our situation may be different than yours. That said, I have found it very convenient to have my Dutch bank account. I use It every time I visit. There are many places where it is only possible to pay ...


1

As I understand it: You have a Spanish D (long-stay) visa valid from September 4th. You have two citizenships. One would require a visa, and the passport has the Spanish visa in it. The other does not require a visa. I think your concern about missing stamps is misplaced. You are traveling with a combination of passports and disjointed stamps are common ...


1

Depending on the Préfecture, it can take anywhere from three months to half a year. Normally your récepissé is valid for three months, if memory serves, and you should visit the préfecture when it expires to get it extended. And possibly enquire about your card. Although you'll probably only get a short "Je sais pas" answer...


1

You should be able to apply for a visa wherever you live, even if you're not its citizen. The German consulate would likely not reject your application just because you are not an Italian citizen. You're still an Italian resident anyways. Though you'd better check with the consulate to make sure of this, e.g. no special restrictions apply for your ...


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