6

There is no validation that you actually live at the address, so use the address of your parents, friends, colleagues etc and ask them to forward any correspondence. There are also tons of commercial providers that provide this as a service, just search for "us address rental" or equivalent.


5

RBC allows creating a "Non-Resident account for immigration purposes", as far as I know at no-cost, and they don't require you to apply in person in Canada. However the process is not simple and there are restrictions on what you can do with this account. 1- It is not a chequing account, you cannot request any cheques from it. 2- You can deposit funds, but ...


5

Not if you have 30% ruling. 30% Ruling and Box 3 of your tax return Under the 30% ruling you can opt for ‘partial non-residency status’. You are then considered to be a non-resident tax payer in Box 2 and Box 3, even though you are living in the Netherlands. For Box 1 income you are considered a resident tax payer, therefore you do not pay ...


5

Summary: In general, the Dutch tax office cares about your worldwide income and assets and you can be taxed on savings abroad but you might also be eligible for a rebate or even omit some of your assets and income entirely depending on your situation. You generally have to pay income and capital/wealth tax on your worldwide income and assets, not only on ...


5

There are certainly better ways to keep track of your finances than a spreadsheet. Personal financial management software is a broad category and offers a wide variety of choices, from free to paid. One way to handle multiple currencies is to maintain a different ledger for each currency that you deal with. Or, if you transfer money frequently, then you may ...


4

The issue of US address doesn't have to do with the way that banks and brokerage firms deal with addresses but it has to do with Anti-Money Laundering regulations like Patriot Act. One of the things that Patriot Act requires the banks and brokerages to do is to verify who you are (Patriot Act Section 326), and in addition if you have a foreign address there ...


4

Ultimately it is up to the individual company or venue to set whether or not they make a distinction between domestic or international students but I am yet to find one that does. From Carnegie Hall: Buy your tickets at the Box Office on 57th Street and Seventh Avenue. A student photo ID is required for purchase of up to two tickets. which means that as ...


4

If you only care about your current assets a simple spreadsheet might actually be enough. For personal, but more advanced use you might consider getting a personal budgeting / personal finance software, like YNAB or Moneydance. YNAB is easier to use, but only has minimal multi-currency support (you have to create a separate budget for each currency), while ...


4

The main sources of financial help available to students in France are: A Bourse de l'enseignement supérieur sur critères sociaux is a means-tested scholarship (eligibility is based on your parents' income). It can be available to foreign students under certain conditions (e.g. if you worked in France before or if your parents live there) but probably not ...


3

I am not sure whether you are eligible but it's very unlikely to be automatic. In my experience, to get any type of refund, you have to submit a tax return (aangifte doen), if only to confirm that you haven't had any other sources of income than those the tax office knows about. Incidentally, you can still do that up to five years afterwards and they even ...


2

From my experience in a state accredited private University, as a foreign student I was not eligible for any financial aid or (of course) discount on tuition. Anything that required a student ID though is the same for everybody in my experience: foreign students are issued the same Student IDs as everybody else.


2

The easiest way to get around the problem is to get an International Student ID card. You have a lot of information in: http://www.isic.org/ They also connect you to sites that offer discounts. Quite useful.


2

Normally when someone immigrates to the Netherlands, this person is taxed there on his worldwide income. The Netherlands also taxes its residents on their deemed income from their worldwide savings and investments. The tax is 30% of a 4% deemed return on their investment (so 1.2% on their net wealth). If this person would hold the 30% ruling, this may all ...


2

As a foreign citizen in Australia, your credit score on arrival is zero. For some people (google some forums to see the horror stories) this works out well for them, for others like yourself, it's just one of the many trials of moving countries (I feel your pain). However, what you can do is get letters of recommendation from your bank, a print of your on-...


2

I believe you are unlikely to find such cards offered in the Netherlands. The reason is that for a credit card company to offer 1.5% rebate on purchases, those purchases must have a high mark-up to begin with, or alternatively an extra-high fee for credit card use. As the Netherlands is more of a debit-card culture, the former would be rare - you are most ...


2

I was also rejected by the credit agencies in not only freezing my credit but just to request the annual report. As an expat living abroad, I can not provide the requested documents proving US residency. It can not be that a US citizen with US financial accounts and credit history does not have the same right to protect their data and identity as someone ...


2

You might get a tax refund, as I did when I returned. And then it will be very difficult for you to get that money to you if you do not have a local bank account. If you are sure of not getting any tax refunds in future, go ahead by closing the account.


1

Finally someone re-posted the original English which had enough citation info to find the ruling. It might be tricky to claim this ruling for the situation in my first paragraph because this case was an appeal for a visa denial that was not based on working remotely. It was based on the Moscow consulate’s suspicion that the applicants’ income claims were ...


1

In a comment, you wrote My plan is to use the money in my account to for the air ticket and the first month or so of my stay in Ireland, until my first paycheck comes in. I have checked the rent and other living expenses in Cork, and I believe USD 3000 should be enough for me to start with. In that case, you have a cushion of 50% over your budget. I do ...


1

I still have my Dutch bank account even though I have not lived there for 5 years. My wife and I still own a house there and my sister in law lives there so our situation may be different than yours. That said, I have found it very convenient to have my Dutch bank account. I use It every time I visit. There are many places where it is only possible to pay ...


1

As of December 2016, NVC no longer requires "wet ink" signatures on I-864 submitted to it. You can submit photocopies of the signed form, but they do not accept "digital signatures".


1

You start at the beginning when building a credit rating in the US. The best way to begin is with a secured credit card from a credit union and yes, you will need to present a Social Security card to get it. (ITIN is not good enough.) A typical secured credit card is on the order of $500. Use it for a good while, build up a good credit history and when your ...


1

It does matter if you live at the address. I live abroad and tried this with my usual American address I use for things and was rejected by equifac and trans union. "Not enough info to verify." I could send further detail, they said, like utility bill at that address etc. So I can't freeze my credit report,


1

Just as a baseline: In a department store (Debenhams) the exchange rate now is $1.4715 to sell and $1.6252 to buy right now, which means exchanging pounds to dollars and back gets you 90.5% of your money back, without any effort. I believe their selling rate is decent (because they have lots of competitors), but their buying rate is awful (because the ...


1

Use a foreign exchange comparison site such as http://travelmoney.moneysavingexpert.com/holiday-money/ (Select the Buyback link for foreign currency to UK pounds transactions).


1

While it is possible there are other reasons, I think one reason they want a US address is for tax reporting. They may need to report your income to your US state of residence, but if they don't have an address for you in some state they have no idea which state they should be reporting to. Thus, while the foreign address could be for the obvious reason, ...


1

Not true. Schwab has an 'international' division that will let you open a brokerage (not bank) account if you reside outside of the US. It is a service geared towards foreign investors, not US expats. Schwab US bank and brokerage will close your accounts if you tell them you are moving outside the US - even if you are a US citizen. They told me that today ...


1

Yes, Schwab can accommodate anyone with an anywhere in the world address. Here is the link for information and application process: http://international.schwab.com/public/international/accounts_products/accounts/brokerage_account


1

HSBC has offices all over the world. You may also want to look into a service like Earth Class Mail which will let you maintain a US address even if you are living outside of the country.


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