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8

Yes, normally they can tell that the license is exchanged because there is a mention at the back, on the bottom part, (at the very least, for the new, credit-card format licenses) with a code indicating the country that originally issued the license. It looks a bit like this on my exchaned French license (my own picture, I deleted out some details, but I ...


5

As promised, I am completing my comment with an answer. As @audionuma mentioned, the housing market in Paris is quite difficult, even for locals. Indeed, it is technically illegal to refuse a guarantor because s/he is not French or doesn't live in France. Here is what the law states (article 22-1 of the law regarding rentals, modified by the latest ...


5

(Partial answer) As mentioned on https://www.service-public.fr/particuliers/vosdroits/F31267, it is legal for the owner to require a garantor (a caution), notice that it is not mandatory. La présentation d'une caution n'est pas une obligation légale. Toutefois, un bailleur peut exiger la présence d'une caution pour louer son logement. En pratique, ...


5

There is no easy way to extend visa-free entry. Generally an extension is only allowed if you cannot leave the Schengen area (force majeure) or you can provide “proof of serious personal reasons”. Otherwise you have to leave and re-enter, respecting the 90/180 day rule. You could consider applying for a long-stay visa from your country of residence before ...


4

The prefectures have a tendency to do that when the duration of the contract extension is quite short...instead of giving you a new titre de séjour, they will just give you a récépissé until such time that you are able to show that you have a contract extension or have right to unemployment benefits (this is what the attestation pôle emploi is for). ...


4

Disclaimer: Having been through the process, I'm providing my own answer to help future startup founders. This is my feedback. I might be wrong on some points as some of this might not apply to your situation. Feel free to ask any separate questions on this site referring back to this question, or add your own experience as a comment. Together let's build ...


3

There is actually no mandatory lunch break in France at all. If you work more than 6 hours in a day, your employer has to give you a 20-minutes break (for lunch or otherwise), which is not counted as part of your working time. A collective bargaining agreement can provide for other rules and most employees take much longer lunch breaks. Legally, you do not ...


3

It would better if you apply for a new passport because of this. Some border officials can be very picky about this. It often possible to used a cancelled passport with a valid visa together with a valid passport. I would apply for the passport, where possible with proof of application. When applying for the visa, inform them that a new passport has ...


3

I'm not sure this page answers whether you need a separate bedroom for your children, but it does give information on the apartment size. Open the Conditions section. It contains the income and housing requirements. Based on this page it looks like La Mans falls into zone B2. B2 requires 24 square meters for 2 people plus 10 square meters per additional ...


3

Based on personal experience in France : Theoretically, your wife may decline the mandatory mutuelle from her employer based on the fact that she is already covered by your own mandatory mutuelle. Notice that the request has to be explicitly done at the time of entering the new company. She might be asked to prove that she is already covered by producing an ...


2

(sorry I cannot do a "comment" in this stackexchange since I do not yet have the requisite score) There are a few different ways forward, depending on whether your is husband under a "scientifique-chercheur" long-stay titre de séjour or a "étudiant". If it's the former: http://www.rhone.gouv.fr/Demarches-administratives/Sejour-travail-naturalisation-et-...


2

I will try my best to answer your question: The European blue card in France is linked to the multi-year resident permit (the "titre de séjour pluriannuel") called the "passeport talent" (see number 2 of the article L313-20 in the French code for foreigners or CESEDA), thus it has the same conditions. You cannot change jobs until AFTER the 2nd year of your ...


2

You do not need a student visa. The Schengen regulations cover all short-stays in France no matter their purpose. You don't need one in your case but there is even a box “study” on the standard Schengen short-stay visa application form and your visa-free stay would be governed by the same rules. Should you need a French long-stay visa for another purpose, ...


2

On a strict reading of the law, this is indeed important and can have a huge impact. Uninterrupted “communauté de vie” since the marriage is one of the requirement for citizenship “par déclaration”. That's why you are asked to vouch that you never separated. It's more common to see couples who are still separated or on the verge of divorce having trouble ...


2

As a refugee, there is no duration of residence requirement. There are a bunch of other conditions, in particular you need to speak some French and have a stable job. If that's not the case, I would recommend working on that first.


2

In France you have 2 exams to achieve in order to get a driving license: 1st: The theorical exam usually called Code / Code de la route, it is a multiple choice questionnary, you can train it either in a driving school where there is training session or online. It's easier with driving school as they manage your registration for the official exam session ...


1

As a tourist in France, without health insurance, you simple pay the bill of the doctor. Going to a local doctor, that speaks your language, togeather with a printout of what is needed would seem to me the best way to find out what it costs. As to you being in France without a visa, when you need a visa, is something that should also be asked in the ...


1

Your additional comment explains a lot and thus I am writing this as an answer. The visa that you got is a visa long séjour temporaire and not a "visa long séjour valant titre de séjour" or vls-ts, which I mentioned above in my comment. The original purpose of the visa notwithstanding (studies or otherwise) in this case, doesn't really matter. The ...


1

Your institute of study or internship host will help you take care of this Adding to @EugenMartnov's valid answer: You are one of many many students in the same situation. I'm certainly this will be legal. However - there could be some sort of procedure involved to clear your stay with the relevant Dutch authorities, or alternatively to provide you with ...


1

In my knowledge you are will be legally staying in the Netherlands only with a valid French residence permit. I don't know how they will handle working for your internship, most probably they will treat you as French tax subject and they will pay to your French bank account the salary. I don't think you can work with French residence permit unless it is EU ...


1

The answer above is quite right. I am writing this to summarize my research into this as well as provide some extra references. European Blue Card and Job Change The following two explain what is relevant for job change for European Blue Card holders: Article R5221-3 of the labor code states that one can change jobs after two years as long as it is ...


1

You're going to be a resident of France, and as such you will have one month to re-register a car with foreign plates which you take with you. http://www.frenchpropertylinks.com/essential/registering-car-france.html : Your UK driving licence is valid in France until it expires, while you are allowed to keep UK plates for up to six months if you are a non-...


1

A national visa (type D) allows you to visit other Schengen countries for up to 90 days in any 180-day period. See for example Long-stay visa holders to have greater freedom to move around the EU.


1

ANPR cameras at the UK ports and in Police Cars will flag the car up as no MOT very quickly and there will be other problems if you have SORNed it in the UK. The UK authorities have wide powers to seize unlicenced vehicles to remove them from the highway. The lack of an MOT is a criminal offence but this can be circumvented by arranging an MOT close to the ...


1

I have travelled both inside (France - Netherlands) and outside the Schengen zone (France - UK / Croatia) on my récépissé with no problems. The airport I leave from is Marseille and they always check passports coming back in. Anyway once you have the récépissé, the next step is picking up the carte de séjour when you receive the letter. I can't remember ...


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