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2

Many countries only provide (routine) consular services to people who reside lawfully in the consulate's district. The basis of your lawful residence in the US is your US nationality; if you were not a US citizen they would require you to show a US visa, I-94 form, or other documentary evidence of lawful immigration status before they would help you with ...


1

You don't have to do anything and your title remains valid unless the préfecture moves to invalidate it, which they are presumably entitled to do, as you probably do not fulfill the conditions anymore (e.g. you left your job or stopped your studies). As far as I know, they are happy to wait for the renewal or do a yearly sweep and are not super aggressive in ...


10

Your citizenship is irrelevant, you only get a EHIC through affiliation with one of the EU's statutory healthcare/insurance systems. You could therefore have gotten one as a Brazilian citizen and becoming Italian doesn't fundamentally change your situation in that respect. In fact, I couldn't find anything on the EU website about “your country”, it's very ...


4

Under the circumstances you describe, you won't be working in France, so you won't need a French work permit. But French payroll systems will generally assume that the worker is in France, so subject to French taxation, labor law, and so on. You won't be subject to those things. If the French company has no payroll in Croatia, they won't be able to comply ...


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