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Is it simple to have a blue card in France since i'm holding German one? It's not exactly simple. You still need to apply with all the usual documentation (diploma, etc.) and a lot of info from your employer (requirements here under “Emploi hautement qualifié"). It's not like a driving license where you hand in your German document and get a French one ...


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Would there it be a problem in this case? No. EU countries aren't supposed to stamp EU passports, so virtually no Italian (or other EU citizen) leaving France (or other Schengen country) has any record of when they last entered France or the Schengen area. I would like to assume the pickiest immigration officer possible. If your Italian citizenship comes ...


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You probably won't be asked for passport. You can also use your national ID from Spain/Netherlands to travel since you're an EU citizen.


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No. An EU Blue Card gives highly-qualified workers from outside the EU the right to live and work in an EU country, provided they have higher professional qualifications, such as a university degree, and an employment contract or a binding job offer with a high salary compared to the average in the EU country where the job is. You must work as a paid ...


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That's not what the Blue Card system is for. You have to apply and reside in the country where you would be working. Since you mentioned applying in France, let's assume you found a job there. The residence permit you will get does not allow you to live in Germany and won't offer a path to permanent residence there. The only rules that apply are French rules ...


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You can apply as soon as you qualify, you do not have to wait for anybody. Your wife wouldn't automatically qualify because you do and consequently wouldn't become French immediately. She will have to wait to qualify herself. By contrast, your children could become French as soon as you do (that's called effect collectif). It's not necessary for them to wait ...


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