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15

You're a US citizen, subject to US tax disclosure requirements. (Even expatriates are subject to this.) US law requires banks dealing with US citizens to inform the Internal Revenue Service of certain information. In this case, the W-9 form will provide the IRS with some information about your tax obligations in France, which will help them determine if ...


13

There are several options: Marry a US citizen. Once the US government is satisfied that your marriage is not a sham marriage (i.e.: you didn't get married just for the immigration benefits) - you'll get a green card (permanent residency). After three years as permanent resident married to a US citizen, you can apply for US citizenship. Get a green card on ...


8

Under the bilateral agreements with the EU (currently still in force, possibly not for long), you do have the right to move to Switzerland for a short time to look for work. What you need for that is a “livret L” as you can't get a “livret B” before you have a specific job offer. I am not entirely sure how it works in practice but my understanding is that ...


7

As an EU citizen you can live long term in any other EU country. For less than three months you don't need to do anything (apart form having your passport or National ID with you). For longer terms however you have to either be engaged in economic activity (work there), or have enough resources to not become a burden on the social services of the host Member ...


7

Each country has a list of countries (or states, provinces) that they have a reciprocal agreement with. With these agreements, it's often possible to skip the practical test, sometimes the written test as well, if you exchange your license that is from a country on the list. The French Embassy in Washington DC has a list of the US states that have ...


6

You can do it at a consulate, the costs (it's free if you still have the old one, €25 otherwise) and requirements are the same, except that you usually need to make an appointment in advance, whereas it's not always required in small towns. I have done it several times at different consulates with no issues (but it can take a couple of months). If you have a ...


6

Generally you just say you are married when anyone asks you, in most cases they will just simply believe you. If they need proof you just have to show them your foreign marriage certificate. If it doesn't have an English translation you should translate it using an official translator though, otherwise they won't know what it means. Some foreign registrars (...


6

Before addressing your questions, I would like to mention the difference between having a valid visa and having valid status. The visa has no bearing whatsoever on whether you are allowed to stay in the US. It allows you to travel to the US and apply for entry. Therefore, you don't need a valid visa unless you're planning to leave and reenter the US. See, ...


5

Generally speaking, French law does not make multiple citizenship difficult in any way. You don't need to renounce any prior nationality to become French and there are very few situations in which you lose it when you are. Perd-on la nationalité française en acquérant une autre nationalité ? is a brief overview of the latter aspect from the official ...


5

It might help you document possession d'état, i.e. the fact that your grandfather continued to make use of his citizenship. Beyond that the rules are complex and it's difficult to determine whether you are a French citizen or not with so little information. Do note however that the main obstacle to having your French citizenship recognized is the fact that ...


4

I don't know of any country having a numerical limit on how many citizenships their citizens may have: either they allow multiple citizenships or they don't. France allows it by not disallowing it in law, but it is also explicitly stated in various governmental sources that multiple citizenships are allowed. For example, on the Foreign Ministry's website: ...


4

You almost certainly are a French citizen already (and if you are, it would be because you have been one since your birth). If you wish to use that citizenship and perhaps pass it on to your children, you will need to apply for a passport, ID card and/or a certificat de nationalité française at the nearest consulate. I would advise doing that now rather ...


4

1. Absolutely no idea. Few people can tell the future these days. However, you should be aware that the official policy in the EU is to avoid double nationalities. It's not strictly enforced, however. In other words, they can ask you to "surrender" your British passport (you can usually get another one rather quickly). 2. French law and administration have ...


4

First, in France, you have to be married to ask for a spouse visa (or about to get married). Then, the process could be long and painful. My first advice would be to ask/print for all official papers (in Australia, like birth certificate, etc.). Then contact an attorney in France which will handle the paperwork for you if you are already in France. The ...


4

Would I need to show them my birth certificate? There is a page that discusses whether you need a birth certificate to apply for a passport. It says that one condition that relieves you of this requirement is: vous êtes né(e) à l’étranger et votre acte de naissance étranger a été transcrit dans les registres de l’état civil consulaire français. ...


3

Assuming your mother was born in France, was a French national and did not renounce her nationality, my understanding is that you are already a citizen and don't need to "apply" for citizenship. To prove it to the authorities that would grant you a passport though, you might have to do some work. If your mother had the foresight of having your birth ...


3

According to Wikipedia on French nationality law: Dual citizenship has been permitted since 1973. Possession of one or more other nationalities, does not, in principle, affect the French nationality. (I'm afraid I don't have an official reference for that.) For the US side, acquiring US citizenship does not require that you give up other citizenships. I ...


3

Quebec understandably tries to attract immigrants with a good command of French and incite other immigrants to learn the language but knowing it is not, as far as I know, a strict requirement. Rather, it provides (many) extra points in the selection grid, can in certain cases exempt you from some yearly quota, etc. Because there are many points attributed ...


3

No, it does not. If your father's uncle would have become French (and that's already a big if), there are complex rules regarding his own children and whether they would still be French living abroad but in your case none of that is relevant, as he is not your ascendant.


2

In the end, we chose a "détachement" solution under which I am still covered by French social security.


2

The French embassy in London probably does not have the record for an acquisition of French nationality that happened in France. They nevertheless may have some clues on how to conduct such a search. So you can call the French embassy, unless you have some undisclosed reason not to do so.


2

I am not a tax expert. What usually happens is that you would be considered tax resident in Morocco, as you have lived there for 183 days or more in the year. This is especially true since you have been employed there and paid tax there before, and have a residence card there. I would say that you should declare your earnings from the French company as ...


2

Brexit and EEA Dependants: what to do The "canonical" recommended steps to take beforehand are... Those EEA citizens or their family members in the UK who does not have an EU/EEA permanent residence card for the UK should consider now whether to apply (or timetable for when they can apply) and should do so unless there is clear harm in doing so. If they ...


2

The registration process you quoted from gov.uk is only relevant to British citizens. All countries generally recognize marriages established other countries. (Excepting new stuff like gay marriages).


2

Some courts decisions I read when preparing my answer to Will it be possible to get French citizenship? suggests that the 50-year delay is counted from the date you try to get your citizenship recognised. Even if the wording of article 30-3 is slightly different, that's also what article 23-6 suggests. Under this interpretation, the question becomes “Has ...


2

Many important facts are missing from your description but I am confident that we can already conclude that it would almost certainly be impossible, for two reasons: For you to be French, your father would need to have been French when you were born. From your question, it seems he was born before your grandfather became French. Theoretically it could be ...


2

Most of the time in France, when police comes because you are too noisy, they will begin by asking you to stop and it will end here if you comply (and don't start again once they are gone). edit I forgot to mention that it depends on what kind of noise is involved. If we are speaking either of partying/music/tv or home improvement noises, the above ...


2

The carte de séjour can be revoked when someone has left the French territory for 3 years. So yes, he would have lost his status. It would have been possible for him to extend it, but it appears that he would have had to request it, probably before the 3 years had passed. That said, it may be worth asking someone (e.g. at the Embassy) to confirm. ...


2

I'm not sure it would possible, since you're been, and France considers that you don't have a link to that name any longer. However, generally speaking if you want to a family name to your ID papers (ID card, passport), there's a line or two in the form for a request to add an extra name. Usually it's called a nom d'usage, and would appear after your last ...


2

You should almost certainly write a will. Depending on the state in which you live, it is just possible that will not be necessary. However to write the will, I very very strongly suggest you consult a lawyer; this is particularly true because you are an ex-pat. (DIY wills can easily cause a great deal more trouble). If the intestacy laws in your state ...


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