13

Embassies often have lists of doctors that speak the language of the country in question. I would call them and ask if they have a recommendation. That's how I found doctors in Asia. The UK Embassy in France lists for example a link to to AngloInfo, which in return has this page here about healthcare in France. The French US embassy has a list of English ...


7

Your consulate might have a list but that's a long shot as they are not always up to date (I know the US does something like that but I don't know if they would help non-US citizens and then they might refer you to an expensive private clinic like “Hôpital américain”). You could at least check the websites of several consulates, in case they publish it. I ...


7

Any maternity related costs are usually covered by your Krankenkasse, your health insurance. Typically one requirement for holding a long-term visa is the enrolment in a healthcare plan; you either had to proof that you have a foreign health insurance which covers your costs while in Germany, but since that's rather unlikely over the long term, you most ...


6

I live in Antony, just south of Paris, and I couldn't find comprehensive information about english speaking doctors. In general, I have to phone a doctor (GP or otherwise) to make an appointment and soon find out if they speak english, while I'm talking to them with my lousy french. If you can find email addresses for the GPs near you, then that might be a ...


5

Thai citizens get health care effectively free (or very low cost) at government hospitals. I believe that there is not an upper age limit for this. AIA claim to provide health care for people up to 80 years old : http://www.aia.co.th/en/individuals/products-and-services/life-insurance/medical-coverage/medical_coverage.html


5

To get any kind of NHS treating the easiest way is to get a GP. You should be able to find one in your area quickly, and registration takes around 30 minutes. Not having a GP means that even if you are entitled to NHS care, you can get into problems. They usually ask for your NI number (which is different to your NHS number) when registering with a GP, and ...


5

I had a similar problem when I moved to Singapore for work a couple months ago. Here are my conclusions. The offer you got sounds like what the employer is obliged to provide for S-Pass holders and Work Permit holders. In this case, it will cover your medical costs of up to at least 15'000 $. If you are however under an Employment Pass, then this is an ...


4

Whoever is resident in Italy (foreigners from everywhere too) has the right to register to the National Health Care System. This registration is not just a right is even mandatory and is called "Registrazione Obbligatoria al Servizio Sanitario Nazionale". Regularly resident is whoever has a valid permission (permesso di soggiorno o carta di soggiorno) or ...


4

Lets begin here I'm a US Citizen, working for a US company which pays 100% of my health insurance costs with a US company. I'm living in Mexico, which has "Social Security", which offers access to the government hospitals. I am assuming you are referring to IMSS which is related to the universal coverage aspects in Mexico vs Seguro Popular which is ...


3

They are not required to do it but some insurers in the public insurance system do cover health check-ups for people under 35, usually with a rather low cap on spending (€50-150). Krankenkassen.de has a list. This should cover a visit to the GP and maybe a basic blood work but a few web searches suggest a full checkup (with ECG, lung capacity, ultrasonogram ...


3

I have heard similar comments from friends of mine comparing their national health systems with the NHS. Unfortunately, there does seem to be a range of experiences with the NHS and do keep in mind it is an enormous organisation with mind boggling complexity. Going private has certain advantages, basically you can skip queues and get seen by a specialist ...


3

Home Office guidance based on the Immigration Rules General Grounds for Refusal Section 2 of 5: Considering entry clearance General grounds for refusal Entry clearance: discretionary refusals This page [46] lists the discretionary general grounds for refusal under paragraph 320 of the Immigration Rules (or, for visitors, part V3 of Appendix ...


3

There is no unified concept of residence for all purposes (immigration, taxes, healthcare) and no harmonization or coordination at the EU level. This means that registering in Germany or getting insurance there doesn't per se mean that you cannot be considered a resident elsewhere for some purpose. The UK authorities or the NHS won't be notified of it. In ...


3

If you don't have a “médecin traitant”, there is a financial penalty. Physicians are allowed to charge more (dépassement d'honoraire), the statutory health insurance will only offer reduced coverage and the mutuelle should not cover the difference. The idea is that you should get a referral from your GP before going to other medical professionals (it's ...


3

After having lived in SG now for almost 1.5 years, I think I can answer my question with a clear "It depends". This is my perspective, written from someone who is used to the medical system in Germany. It is true that I got a health insurance from my employer (it's not like in Germany that some amount of money is deducted from my salary that goes to the ...


3

The basic question is : can I get access to a doctor for a non-emergency treatment in France when I'm a visiting non-EU national. The answer is yes. (In particular if you don't intend to get some social security compensation as you explicitly mentioned). Depending on the technical aspect of the treatment you wish to require, that might be more or less easy ...


2

I put a close friend in the country in which I live, if I have one that I'd trust to immediately get into contact with family (etc) in the event of something bad happening. The idea being that if police/hospital need to immediately know things about me (medical history or suchlike) they have a person they can get in touch with without having to worry about ...


2

Based on the conversation with the local NHS Trust, each centre can have set it's own cost for non-insured persons, and also decide what they accept and not as valid proof. They also told me that I should first sort the issue out with the local centre, before raising the problem to the Trust. Based on all this, the local centre required the following: The ...


2

From the NHS website: If you are taken to A&E (accident and emergency department), a minor injuries unit or walk-in centre for emergency treatment then this is free of charge. ... If you need hospital treatment during your stay in the UK, ensure you can provide evidence that you are entitled to free treatment. For ordinary residents, this means ...


2

i have been to the following family practice of 3 young general practictioners www.ipso.paris, and all the physicians claim to speak English. The one i saw actually did speak good English


2

There are several websites where you can book a doctor's appointment online. This isn't a central doctor database: membership in each website requires the doctor to register and pay a fee (what doctors get from it is more publicity). Many of these sites just give the doctor's specialty, name and address but a few offer more. Note that I am only asserting ...


2

No, the EHIC serves a different purpose: The European Health Insurance Card (or EHIC) is issued free of charge and allows anyone who is insured by or covered by a statutory social security scheme of the EEA countries and Switzerland to receive medical treatment in another member state free or at a reduced cost, if that treatment becomes necessary during ...


2

In regards to residence, you do not need to file any paperwork with the UKBA/Home Office. In terms of healthcare, from the NHS website If you are a student from the EEA or Switzerland, you will need a valid EHIC issued by your home country. You'll need to present the card every time that medical care becomes necessary while you complete your course in ...


2

There are several issues here. I know I cannot receive certain government money such as Medicaid. First, it is not true that you cannot receive Medicaid. Nothing legally prevents you from receiving Medicaid if you are eligible according to the state's rules. It is true that you do not currently qualify for Medicaid as you are not yet a permanent resident ...


2

According to the Veterans Administration, regarding benefits for veterans living abroad: Reimbursed medical care for U.S. Veterans residing or traveling in Canada and other foreign countries is limited to treatment for VA rated service-connected disabilities only. The Foreign Medical Program (FMP) Office is responsible for determining eligibility ...


2

As stated in If I live in Sweden but work in Norway, how and where can I get health care? you are covered in both countries. However your wife is only covered fully in Sweden. As stated on the EU's site on cross border workers: If you work and are insured in (...) Norway, (...) your dependants can receive treatment in the country where you work only when ...


2

The US Consulate General in Frankfurt list of doctors and hospitals in Saarland includes eight krankenhäuser und kliniken in Saarbrücken. The International Max Planck Research School offers a list of English-speaking doctors.


2

Not all substances that are government-controlled in the US are so controlled in Canada (and vice versa), so this may or may not matter. Book an appointment with a Canadian family doctor/general practitioner. Bring as many of your US doctor's records as you are able (or have your US doctor forward your records to your new Canadian doctor). Bring copies of ...


2

No, Google Dutch sites for 'Seeing a specialist' and they will tell you that over and over: From iamexpat.nl: If you wish to see a specialist, you will need a referral from a general practitioner. You will also need to show this referral to your insurance company if you wish the costs to be covered. Once you have a referral, you can make an appointment ...


2

It is possible, but not covered by insurance. Source: official government site (in Dutch: "Wilt u een behandeling zelf betalen? Dan heeft u geen verwijzing nodig." - "Do you want to pay for the treatment yourself? Then you don't need a referral")


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