32

Choosing health insurance in Germany is discussed a lot and recently there was a lot of media coverage suggesting that many privately insured have trouble paying their bills. The main difference is as follows: The cost of a private insurance is measured on your personal risk which is assessed by the state of your health and the health of your direct ...


30

This is described on the IRS site on individual and shared responsibility question 12. Are US citizens living abroad subject to the individual shared responsibility provision? Yes. However, U.S. citizens who are not physically present in the United States for at least 330 full days within a 12-month period are treated as having minimum essential ...


19

If you are an employee and earn more than 59400 EUR / year (updated 2018), you can choose between private and statutory health insurance. If you earn less than 59400 you are obliged to get a public insurance. The only way to switch back to statutory health insurance is to earn less than 59400 EUR / year and be younger than 55 years. After that age you ...


11

There is a social side to this question too. Private insurance is cheaper if you are probably not going to use it - if you are young and healthy and childless. (If you are planning on getting old or having children it's not worth it.) So a lot of young healthy people use it because it seems cheap at the time. They are paying into a system which is cheap ...


10

NHS has a page where you can check whether you are eligible for free treatments or not. Note, that GPs are free, but they don't have to accept new patients. Also going to an A&E, Walk-in centre or a Minor injuries unit is also free unless they need to admit you to a hospital. In the hospital some treatments are still free, for example infection ...


10

Supplemental to Karlson's excellent answer, I want to add a few points about where the PPACA can pose problems for expats. While it is true that you do not need to worry about the individual mandate while living abroad (according to the rules in his answer), there are particularly nasty implications of this mandate for expats anyway and being aware of these ...


9

As a foreign student, your university is required to provide you coverage. You must have that coverage through the whole term of your presence as a J1/F1/M1 student as part of the conditions of your visa. Talk to the university's international students' office for details. From what I know (second-hand experience), the prices are not all that different from ...


8

In the European Union, there are strict regulations considering health insurance: You have to be health insured (remember that in unemployment stage, most governments pay your basic health insurance). If you are employed in any country, you have to be insured in such country. If you are employed in more, you can choose any of them. However, the regulations ...


7

You're eligible to sign up, you're not eligible for the State/Federal assistance in paying the premiums. As long as you're a US tax resident (filing forms 1040/1040A/1040EZ, not the NR versions) - you're required by the ACA to have coverage either through the employer or through the exchanges or otherwise. But there are no limitation on your immigration ...


7

For Erasmus, the EHIC card from the home country is enough. During her stay, your friend is still officially registered as a student in your home country so that is where she is registered for health insurance. In addition, EHIC card entitles one to necessary health care in all EU countries so she is covered in case of an emergency. Still, it can be a good ...


7

There are already a lot of answers to this question, but I haven't seen the following information: The money that you pay for private health insurance includes a contribution towards making your health insurance cheaper in old age. This is mandatory for German private health insurances. So German private health insurances are not really comparable to the ...


7

As a dual US/UK citizen if you live outside the US, you are eligible for an exemption for health coverage. If you are living in the US, then you are not an "ordinary resident" of the UK, despite the fact that you are a UK citizen, and you will not be covered by the NHS. According to the NHS: If you are moving abroad on a permanent basis, you will no ...


6

Disclaimer: this is the English translation of the wikipedia site that compares private and state health insurances, and might contain translation errors. If you find some, please fix them. Differences between Private and State Health Insurance Family members without their own income are co-insured free in case the member who is working is part of the ...


6

Not really. You can only apply during the open enrollment period (in California - runs from November till February), and you commit for the year. You can only make changes mid-year if some specific events occur. Also, you may tie yourself to California tax-wise by doing this, which means you'll be exposed to the California income taxes (about 10%) in ...


6

If you stop paying private insurance premiums the contract can't be terminated (you still accrue debt) though at some point they will switch you into the Notlagentarif which offers much reduced benefits. It will cover all acute pain treatment and chronic diseases but that's pretty much it. As soon as you are older than 55 and have been privately insured for ...


5

You should take in account that one other major difference is, the GKV will pay the bills directly. In the PKV you have to pay the bill and collect the money back from the PKV. You can only get back from PKV to GKV when you are not 55 Years old you earned the last 5 years each not more than the Versicherungspflichtgrenze (at the moment 48,600.00 EUR) and ...


5

Normally when changing employer in the US, your old coverage would continue to the end of the month, and the new coverage start the following month. You don't have such an option and don't have a COBRA option as you are returning from the UK. You need to take out some private short term insurance of your own to cover this situation, for example http://www....


5

I'll answer your question in 2 parts as you asked. Yes, you will pay income tax and whatever social security in the USA for USA income in the UK. Only time you get taxed in the UK is if the USA doesn't tax you. (See the Income Tax Treaty and HMRC). You still need to report all global income to the USA and UK. If you satisfy the residence conditions which ...


5

There's a pretty good guide here on the NHIC website. It should walk you through the entire process. You should be able to find your specific visa information there. Otherwise, you can call the NHIC hotline. They have an English line number at 02-390-2000.


5

Thai citizens get health care effectively free (or very low cost) at government hospitals. I believe that there is not an upper age limit for this. AIA claim to provide health care for people up to 80 years old : http://www.aia.co.th/en/individuals/products-and-services/life-insurance/medical-coverage/medical_coverage.html


5

You are a bona fide foreign resident. (The fact that you are not a permanent resident is irrelevant.) Therefore the physical presence test does not apply to you. The fact that you were a student (or otherwise without earned income) is irrelevant. The fact that you moved from one foreign country to another is also irrelevant. You do not need to pay the ...


5

In case you can't claim to be a bona fide foreign resident*, it would be good to take a closer look at how situations like yours and the "Shared Responsibility Payment" interact. I expect you would owe very little. I'm basing the following on information in the instructions for Form 8965, with you as the only person in your tax household. The first thing ...


5

The EU/EEA has a coordination system for social security (which includes national health insurance). One of the fundamental rules of this system is that you are always subject to exactly one national social/health insurance system. Which country you are insured in is determined by a set of rules or (in complicated cases) by a decision of the relevant ...


4

There is no need to register in any way in France. In general, under EU law, you can stay in France under one of two regimes: As a worker, in which case you would automatically be covered by the French mandatory health insurance system As a non-economically active person, in which case you need to have health insurance and sufficient financial means not to ...


4

There's a somewhat more straightforward explanation at http://www.nhs.uk/chq/pages/1087.aspx?categoryid=68&subcategoryid=162: If you move to the UK, you will not be charged for NHS hospital treatment from the date that you arrive as long as: you intend to live permanently in the UK, and you have the right to live permanently in the UK or ...


4

As an expat to Australia who was in the same situation recently, I can't say I found any meaningful differences between the profits and the notionally non-profits, they all quack like ducks and walk like ducks to me. Neither have I found much difference between the insurers I've tried, although given the choice I'd steer away from Medibank, it's government-...


4

I didn't find a convenient official source clearly explaining it all but apparently this is a standard questionnaire that they send for all accidents leading to sick days. If someone else appears to bear some responsibility for the accident, they could try to recover the costs of those sick days from that person. According to what I read, not filling it in, ...


4

For the German system, most likely you can't stay insured there as on the one hand you don't fulfill the criteria for the free family insurance and on the other hand don't work in Germany to be able to insure yourself through your employer. Additionally you aren't enrolled in a university which would give you access to student health care. The health funds ...


4

I had a similar problem when I moved to Singapore for work a couple months ago. Here are my conclusions. The offer you got sounds like what the employer is obliged to provide for S-Pass holders and Work Permit holders. In this case, it will cover your medical costs of up to at least 15'000 $. If you are however under an Employment Pass, then this is an ...


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