Hot answers tagged

19

You're going to have to accept that your body doesn't know how to deal with some of the local pathogens/bugs just yet, and will need time to get used to it. You don't want to overwhelm yourself, so you could start small - just brushing your teeth with water - small amounts to start 'infecting' yourself with the local stuff. Although this so-called traveler'...


13

Most immigrants find adjusting to new countries/cultures very challenging. One of the reasons is that social settings and usual way of life are mostly different in geographically disparate countries. A few things I recommend are : Learning about societal norms of the new country can help. Talking to people at work, mingling with colleagues at lunch hour, ...


11

In my experience the actual answer is an option that you haven't listed: the babies crawl on the same floor on which people walk in their shoes. Yet they seem to get no sicker than babies who live in homes where people don't wear their shoes (for such homes also exist in the US).


9

The issue that I most frequently encountered with expats is that they continuously talk bad about their new home and how much better it would have been if they were home or in the one other country where the food/weather/people/costs/whatever is so much better than where they are now. This is a extremely damaging process to the person and everyone around ...


7

To get a European Health Insurance Card, you need to be covered by a statutory health care/health insurance system in one of the participating countries. In the UK, it basically means being a resident. Citizenship is not relevant, non-citizens can have access to the NHS and get an EHIC if they reside in the UK. But British citizens are not automatically ...


7

As others said, it might take a while to build up immunity to the critters in the water, even water that is technically safe to drink. I used small square ice cubes, from a tray that makes 20 cubes instead of 10 or 12. You can probably find these in your grocery store or home center, they only need to be big enough to fit in your mouth to melt comfortably, ...


6

Not really. You can only apply during the open enrollment period (in California - runs from November till February), and you commit for the year. You can only make changes mid-year if some specific events occur. Also, you may tie yourself to California tax-wise by doing this, which means you'll be exposed to the California income taxes (about 10%) in ...


5

I think that you can limit the exposure to the local water infections in one more way that is not mentioned in the other answers I think: You can purify reasonable amounts of water at home. You need a chlorine desinfection, plastic bottles and a fridge. Just use the chlorine dosage mentioned on the bottle for drinking water / well water desinfection, and ...


5

In my experience, locals tend to distrust the water more than foreigners think. If you are concerned about pathogens in the water, keep in mind that many people in most countries I have been to boil tap water if they are going to drink it, even if the government advertises the drinking water as safe. As one individual in Quito, Ecuador told me, "I trust ...


4

Cultural shock, some call it. Besides all what was mentioned above, I can add the following points, based on my personal experience: Meet people from your home country - depending on where you are, of course; if you live in a capital city, there is most probably an embassy or a cultural center which would connect you to your co-patriates. Join a community -...


4

Having gone through this, I would say that depression is at least as much a social illness as much as it is a neurological one. No amount of therapy or drugs can make up for the social damage that depression can arise from. Based on anecdotal experience, I think this is an even larger issue for women than for men (my parents tell very different stories of ...


4

From the German side of things: Whenever you become unemployed, you can probably be covered in one way or another. If you get unemployment benefits (ALG I), the Bundesagentur für Arbeit pays a predefined amount of money to your previous health insurer, who should continue to cover you. If you don't get unemployment benefits because there is a Sperrzeit (i.e....


4

There is no need to register in any way in France. In general, under EU law, you can stay in France under one of two regimes: As a worker, in which case you would automatically be covered by the French mandatory health insurance system As a non-economically active person, in which case you need to have health insurance and sufficient financial means not to ...


4

They are not required to do it but some insurers in the public insurance system do cover health check-ups for people under 35, usually with a rather low cap on spending (€50-150). Krankenkassen.de has a list. This should cover a visit to the GP and maybe a basic blood work but a few web searches suggest a full checkup (with ECG, lung capacity, ultrasonogram ...


4

You may be interpreting the policy incorrectly. They do not care about your nationality, instead they care about where you are living... You’ll need to have a tuberculosis (TB) test if you’re coming to the UK for more than 6 months and are resident in any of these listed countries. If you have lived in your current country legally for more than 6 ...


4

A majority of non-retired Americans, the vast majority if you exclude people poor enough to qualify for Medicaid, have employer-based health insurance. Employer group insurance premiums tend to be lower for what you get (self-selection effects in the individual market tend to make those risk pools sicker), and are cheaper still because the premiums are paid ...


4

It's much different than you think. The German public health insurance will simply ask you to provide your German and your UK tax bill and if you refuse to give it to them, they assume you are earning as much as the Beitragsbemessungsgrenze (about 50.000 €) each year. And calculate your fee accordingly. They will ask you for these documents each year.


4

Unless your shoes get unusually dirty or muddy, nothing terrible ever happens. You can wear shoes in a house and let your pants touch the floor and, really, nothing happens. You don't get ugly stains on your pants. You don't get sick. Of course, there are exceptions. When it's muddy or rainy, people will wipe off their shoes when entering a house or remove ...


4

Nothing with respect to the residence permit. Note that the condition says After having arrived in the Netherlands, you will undergo a medical test for tuberculosis (TB). not that you must be TB-free. This is confirmed by the international help organization in the Hague: It is important to know that even if the test shows that you have TB, this will not ...


3

Assuming the child has now been born in Norway, you no longer have a problem. For the benefit of others, I will answer as if it is still December 2015 and your visa has not yet expired. If you have missed the chance to renew your visa, and you cannot renew it by briefly leaving the country (which in this case of course you couldn't), then it is generally ...


3

The patient fee varies depending on if you visit a primary health care provider or an emergency room, and can also vary between different parts of Sweden. The fees are very low though; usually vary between 100-300 SEK. You pay either with a credit/debit card, cash, or they send you a bill. There is also a cap at 1800 SEK for the maximum amount you pay for ...


3

If you are on a K visa your intent is to get married within 90 days of your arrival. That situation aside a lot(if not all) of insurance plans provided in most states(if not all) the US for the employees or even those purchased individually provide coverage for the domestic partner and definitely for the spouse, so your fiancee if he/she already has ...


2

Rules and practices differ from one country to the other so it will be very difficult to provide a comprehensive answer. Some European countries (e.g. France or the UK) do require a medical exam for immigrant visas but as far as I know the focus is on a limited number of contagious diseases, especially tuberculosis. For example, in the case of France, ...


2

I have not been able to find an authoritative source for that but it seems there is no way around the student insurance if you remain registered at a German university. The only exception mentioned in the extensive Wikipedia article on the topic (in German) is for people who are still covered through their parents' health insurance and is only possible if ...


2

This might not be the answer that you're looking for, but I always just drink the water. Whether I've been in Colombia, Armenia or lots of other countries, I've never had a problem.


2

If you are going to live in a new place not just as a tourist, but for a long term, then I suppose there is no better way to develop immunity than to expose yourself to whatever new elements and their associated organisms that present themselves in the new environment. I tend to think that even those people---like myself---who grew up in developing ...


2

Quite a few products are designed to keep medication (such as insulin) cool while travelling, some for as long as 48 hours, and which might work for you. A quick search on Amazon turned up any number of choices such as ThermaFreeze and Frio. The Frio website has lots of other options, helpful FAQs and links about travelling with medications, and a vendor in ...


2

You would have to check with your provider to make sure that your plan has full coverage for you abroad. Insurers do offer plans for expats, and, if yours does not, you can try searching on 'global health insurance' for other that do. As examples: Aetna IMG Cigna Allianz GeoBlue Global Medical Also returned in the Google search is this article on ...


2

As a visitor I went to emergency care in a hospital in Sweden. They simply came to me with some paperwork and I paid with a debit card. Ask your university if it is recommended to buy supplemental insurance. My guess would be however, that the fees are intended to be affordable to all Swedish people so therefore, pretty cheap.


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