6

Yes, a valid US passport is enough. Any one of the items is enough. See the I-130 instructions, General Requirements #3 (page 6): What documents do you need to show that you are a U.S. citizen? A. A copy of your birth certificate, issued by a civil registrar, vital statistics office, or other civil authority showing that you were born in ...


5

According to the Social Security Administration, you can get a corrected card free of charge by submitting a new application documenting the correct name. Since you would presumably be submitting the same documents you used in the initial application, you may want to include a short letter explaining what the error is. It should state the name the name ...


5

What you've found is pretty much it, but "a company to sponsor you" could be a company that has offices both in the EU and the US. You might look for companies that you could begin working for in Europe and then try to convince them to transfer you to the US. And keep entering the lottery. You can spend up to 90 days at a time in the US on the visa waiver ...


5

The only document you need to submit to indicate that you're filing a joint tax return is the tax return itself. If you were married in 2019, the first tax return for which you'll do this is your 2019 tax return, due in April 2020. If you were married earlier this month then you'll have to wait a year; your filing status for your 2019 returns will remain ...


5

The H1B process takes time, luck, qualifications, fees, and skilled form-filling. I suggest avoiding it by never working in the US. You would go on living in Spain and only visit the US for short periods. In practice, you would use the Visa Waiver Program, but B-1 Temporary Business Visitor lists the permitted business activities for a visitor to the US. ...


5

According to the text of the proclamation suspending entry, it does not apply to permanent residents (i.e. green card holders), so it should not affect your return to the US. See section 2(b)(1) of the proclamation: (b) The suspension and limitation on entry pursuant to section 1 of this proclamation shall not apply to: (i) any lawful ...


4

There's no explicit question here that is on topic for this site, but there is an implicit question about immigration status, perhaps for each of your parents. I presume that your father is a lawful permanent resident (LPR) in the US, that is, that he has a green card. If that is the case then he has nothing to worry about as far as his immigration status ...


4

First, try to find out whether you indeed will need a police certificate. Guide for work permit application including special instructions for Brazil don't say police certificates are absolute requirement but simply that they may ask for them if needed. That said, it is possible that you are getting the certificate just in case it is requested, and therefore ...


4

The reason is that the Immediate Relative category (spouse, parent, or unmarried under-21 child of a US citizen) cannot have derivative beneficiaries, whereas all other family-based categories, as well as employment-based categories and the Diversity Visa, can have derivative beneficiaries. See 9 FAM 502.2-2(B)(d)(1): The INA does not generally accord ...


4

There's no limit. Even if you try to return after the expiration of your I-94, you can just reapply for admission as you did the first time you entered in TN status.


4

There is no such requirement to relax. The requirement is that the permanent resident not abandon his or her residence in the United States. But there is no specific threshold for the duration of absence that causes a permanent resident to lose that status. The determination of abandonment is made individually in each case. Someone who has been away for ...


4

Yes, a US citizen who is 21 or older can petition his/her sibling to immigrate to the US by filing form I-130. A sibling of a US citizen is in the F4 category. According to the current visa bulletin, visa numbers are now available for F4 petitions filed about 14 years ago for people born in most countries (15.5 years ago for people born in India, 22 years ...


3

No, per the UKVI answer to this freedom of information request. You must leave the U.K. within the expiry date of your existing visa unless you have an outstanding application with UKVI. Source: https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/is_there_a_grace_period_after_ex


3

She doesn't need to a K1 fiance visa "to get married" -- B2 tourist visa is fine for marrying in the US if she will leave afterwards. However, she should not enter the US on a B2 visa with preconceived intent to file Adjustment of Status during that stay (this is true regardless of whether she is getting married). If you guys intend to file for Adjustment ...


3

Would I be looking at the full 1 year process before she could come to the US? I don't think it necessarily takes a whole year, but I don't really know, and I am sure that it can take longer than a year in some cases. In principle, yes, you would be looking at the full process. Your spouse can travel to the US as a tourist and then stay in the US for "...


3

Yes, they are eligible for the visa. Congress recognized that many children were aging out due to large USCIS processing backlogs, so it enacted the Child Status Protection Act (CSPA) to protect certain children from aging out. The CSPA went into effect on August 6, 2002. CSPA does not change the definition of a child. Instead, CSPA provides ...


3

Ultimately yes, for permanent residence (a green card) you will need to be sponsored by an employer (unless you happen to meet your future husband/wife). However, asking an employer to sponsor you for a green card is a very big request, particularly for a junior developer. Remember, although there is a need for developers, there are also a lot of ...


3

An NIN may or may not be important for an EEA family permit or a residence card, depending on the circumstances. In any any event, an NIN does not show that the person with the NIN is exercising treaty rights. For example, someone could have an NIN and then move outside the UK. They still have the NIN, but they're not exercising treaty rights. Similarly, ...


3

I believe, that the only way to expedite the H1B process (and also guarantee your visa) is if you were applying to work for an university. My understanding is that because they're cap-exempt you may start working as soon as your visa is granted. Other than that, your best shot would be to contact the local US Consulate and check if they would be willing to ...


3

As far as the documentary requirements for returning to the US, the green card by itself allows you to return to the US after an absence of less than one year. You can always be asked to prove that you maintained residence in the US, no matter how long or short your absence was. (It's possible to be found to have abandoned residence even if each of your ...


2

Your status with respect to federal income tax depends on when you enter the US and on your presence during the previous two tax years (because of the substantial presence test). See Determining Alien Tax Status and Alien Residency - Green Card Test on the IRS website. From the latter: If you meet the green card test at anytime [sic] during the calendar ...


2

The Netherlands has an excellent public school system, and almost everyone completes school speaking fluent English (which is what I presume you want from an International School). If you put your child in public school now, they will integrate with no trouble at all, and they will be completely bilingual (trilingual† if mother and father consistently use ...


2

You were refused under V4.2(c) because you did not satisfy the ECO that you were “genuinely seeking entry for a purpose that is permitted by the visitor routes” https://www.gov.uk/guidance/immigration-rules/immigration-rules-appendix-v-visitor-rules due to your August and October entries using your BRP. These entries, which occurred after your BRP had ceased ...


2

It is possible to have it approved in less than a month in exceptional cases. I know of a case in which the USC, wanting to move to the US for better work opportunities, emailed the HK consulate asking permission to file directly with the consulate for the IR-1 (usually you have to file the petition in the lockbox in Chicago) since he had a job offer in ...


2

The answer is complicated, in general the time counted for permanent residence depends on the kind of residence permit that you have. If you have a student residence permit, then that time does not count. The confusion comes that most non-EU students are doing PhDs on student residence permits, but this is not always the case, because other residence ...


2

If either the permanent resident or the citizen is changing his/her name as a result of the marriage, that partner will need to obtain a new social security card, as well as all the other steps in changing one's name. If either or both partners are employed, the employee may wish to file a new form W-4 with their employer so taxes withheld will be more ...


2

However, it only shows processing times for employment-based cases Not family-based. How can I figure out how to find processing times for family-based file? After you select form I-485, you have to select a service center or local field office in the drop-down menu. You probably selected a service center, which does not process family-based I-485s. If ...


2

The passport number you put on the I-130 doesn't really matter. In fact, they are not required to have a passport to be petitioned. What matters is the passport they present then they actually apply for the immigrant visa.


2

The information that, after filing for an AoS you can't travel outside the U.S. is partially incorrect. You indeed need to wait until you have your Advance Parole/EAD card, when you have it though, you are able to come and go as you please. Please note that at the moment AP/EAD card is taking about 8 months to be approved. There are ways to get it expedited ...


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