11

While there might be very specific agencies that handle the research for you globally, the best thing for you is to first limit the list of countries, and more importantly cities / regions where you would like to move. There are quite a few things to consider, including: The language you have to use during your work and generally The country's visa laws (...


11

m stands for männlich (= male), w stands for weiblich (= female). Exceptions aside, job advertisements have to be formulated in a ‎gender-neutral way. There are three common ways how to do this: Use a term that is gender-neutral (the English term "Web Developer" would work, but the German translation "Webentwickler" not, as it could refer to male web ...


8

You should always assume formal unless you have been advised otherwise. It's generally ok to end up a little overdressed, but it's not ok to end up underdressed. However, software companies can vary. It is going to depend greatly on the culture of the company. If you can, do some research on the culture before the interview. Is there a "team" page on their ...


7

Starting in 2015 (in a week from this post's original date), the Government of Canada will start a new process for candidates to immigration in Canada (the main way to be allowed to work in Canada), called Express Entry. There is an overview of the new system with the main steps and the main information that is necessary for this process. In short, there ...


7

I think "health and safety officer" would fit nicely. I have known people with that job title before, and they were required to know all the latest 'health and safety in the workplace' legislation and regulations, as well as recommendations and guidelines.


6

In order to emigrate to either the United States of America or Australia, based on employment, the company, and you, have to prove that you have the required skills and expertise, and that hiring you wouldn't displace someone already in the country and eligible for the same job. There is a huge difference between jobs for which you're qualified, and jobs ...


5

German is not mandatory for job seeking. You can apply for some positions in English (some job postings are even in English) and you can also get a work visa for highly skilled migrant or residence permit as a job seeker without demonstrating any knowledge of the German language. In practice, some companies do hire English speakers but not knowing German ...


4

Most employment agencies in the UK will deal via phone/email so that shouldn't be a problem. Bigger issues will be interviews (initially likely via phone but a face-to-face may be harder, do you expect them to pay flights?), and the fact you have a 3 year hole in your CV. The issue is likely to be an assumption you'll be looking for relocation assistance, ...


4

Quite honestly I don't think you're going to find a job in IT as quickly as you think. Don't get me wrong, I too moved to Holland with only a couple of month's rent money; but to look for an IT job will take some time, especially given your lack of qualifications (same for me). I'm English so for me the quickest jobs I could find were bar jobs and a pub ...


4

Your passport is with your company? Is that even legal? I'm not sure it is. I would recommend that you contact the consulate of your country of citizenship in Dubai. They will speak your language, they will understand your situation, and they should be able to help.


4

There is a useful online service titled Check if you're a British citizen which you can use to determine your sister's eligibility. It asks a few simple questions and gives you an answer. The answer will depend on factors such as: what date she was born whether your parents were "legally settled" in the UK at the time


4

Yes, fewer than 250 employees is the official mark for a SME (Small or Medium Enterprise), and there are often policies aimed at assisting this end of the market. Points b and c on that document are also aimed at stopping larger businesses getting around this by creating smaller offshoot companies. A job does not have to be on the Shortage Occupation List ...


3

Information on the median income in the UK is available for 2013-2014. The data are for personal income and not household income. For the inner boroughs of London, an income of £30,000 would put you above the median income in Greenwich, Hackney, Islington, Lambeth, Lewisham, Southwark, Tower Hamlets and below in Camden, Hammersmith, Kensington and Chelsea, ...


3

Not exactly your question but it's relevant to it and a bit long for a comment. Schengen visas never allow work in the whole area, nor do they forbid it as such. But if you are from outside the EU and want to take up employment in a Schengen country, you need some form of authorisation to work from that particular country, on top of the authorisation to ...


3

You didn't state where in the Netherlands you will be living. If you have no proof of education your biggest asset is that you speak French and you are also fluent in English (I assume you did write the OP yourself). Not many people in the Netherlands speak French, yet there is quite some trade going on between the Netherlands and France (and other French ...


3

Assuming the job qualifies as a Tier 2 general work visa, the first step is you must obtain a Certificate of Sponsorship. The UK keeps a list of legal sponsors. It doesn't look like Maple Energy is a licensed sponsor. If the company is not a licensed sponsor, this should raise red flags about what visa they are applying for on your behalf. You should ask ...


3

Germany and the UK are separate countries with separate immigration systems (despite the fact that they are both EU countries). If Germany approves your blue card application then you simply will not use that visa. The UK won't care about it.


3

Sorry, I'm not answering the question, but a piece of advice. If you have applied to 50+ places without any replies, than something is probably wrong either with your resume/profile or your job search strategy. Trying to apply in a different country is unlikely to work: landing a job as a foreigner is significantly harder: the hiring company would have to ...


2

In the Netherlands, I would say just as anywhere, it is hard to find good people for tech jobs. If you're good in your profession, it should be easy to find a job. Two places which might help you start: Fronteers (in Dutch) an organization which helps frontend developers and has vacancies listed for that area. Dutch Startup jobs vacancy listing for the ...


2

The details depend a bit on your citizenship, the nature of the work and possibly your status in Spain but basically you need a work permit/visa as you would if you would be coming directly from outside the European Union (usually something called a Gecombineerde vergunning voor verblijf en arbeid). For less than three months, you might also be able to stay ...


2

If you are aged 18-35 you can work in the following countries pretty easily up to 1 year. http://www.international.gc.ca/experience/destinations_out-destinations_sortant.aspx?lang=eng Look for contract positions online, maybe in Ireland or UK where there is a good demand for IT professional and be clear in your CV that you qualify for this kind of VISA. ...


2

You would basically look for a job as you would in France, send your resume, check job offers on websites or go through a temping agency (uitzenbureau in Dutch, travail temporaire or interim in French), etc. A few resources that might be especially useful for you as a French-speaking expat are: leforum.nl, a website for French speakers in the Netherlands. ...


2

The eligibility requirements for a British passport require you to be a British National. The most common type of British National is a British citizen. The online British citizen check will tell you if your sister is a citizen or not. If she is not a citizen, there are two main routes to become a British citizen. The first is by naturalization and takes ...


2

As EU citizen (except if you come from Croatia, for the time being), you are in principle allowed to take on any job you like anywhere in the EU and also to freelance on a par with locals (with a few restrictions for sensitive jobs, e.g. in the military and sometimes some complications to have your credentials recognised if yours is a regulated profession). ...


2

You can use job websites such as reed, monster to look for jobs that of similiar. The main UK Gov website that you can check which is the closet to your job role can be found here: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/guide-method/classifications/current-standard-classifications/soc2010/index.html


2

Based on my australian experience, a formal suit is the best choice unless stated otherwise in an interview invitation.


2

If you're a native English speaker and don't have much Spanish, teaching English is the obvious thing to do. Right now (the first week of September) is precisely the time to visit the private academies and leave a CV, because they'll be starting up again after the summer and will know either now or within a couple of weeks (some pupils skip September because ...


2

If you want to continue in academia, you should look for post-doc positions. There you will do more research and can bolster your record. That would enable to apply for a beginning academic position like as an assistant professor. To work as a civil or structural engineer, you would need to become licensed in Canada. Check out this website. Part of the ...


2

I think the answer depends greatly on what your field is. For software developers, web developers, and others in the IT field generally, Stack Overflow Jobs (https://stackoverflow.com/jobs) is an excellent resource. You can filter by country as well as by whether or not the employer is willing to sponsor a visa and/or offer relocation support. Since you are ...


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