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12

What you want is an "M-Bag", aka the rather less sexy Direct Sacks of Printed Matter to One Addressee, International Surface Air Lift. Nobody knows what the "M" stands for, and while the usual best guess is "Media", I personally prefer "Mystery". Basically, you can stuff a bag -- yes, an actual Santa-style canvas sack -- with up to 66 pounds of any kind of ...


8

For the USPS: Priority Mail International from the US to the UK would be between $201.20 and $231.55 for a 66 pound (30 kg) package, the maximum weight that can be shipped, with two of them required to ship 60 kg. The price you pay depends on how you purchase the postage. It's highest at the post office (the Retail rate), lower online (the Commercial Base ...


7

Long haul shipping, if you want to move your household items. This tends to be either slow and not very cheap, or reasonably fast and quite expensive. Typically, these services would be paid for by your employer. One company that does long haul shipping (and which I've used in the past, with satisfaction) is http://www.go2uti.com. If you just want to move ...


6

When I moved from South Africa to Poland I segregated my belongings. This varies if you are a single or married with children. I was single. Can I buy this in Poland cheaply enough to leave behind in ZA? Clothes, underwear, boots. Basically I took the clothes on me and some 2 pair of clean underwear. Is this expensive, fragile and irreplaceable Notebooks,...


4

Often shipping rates between countries are very different (shipping equivalent boxes to the US from the UK, France and Germany for example), so you'd probably do well to check the prices first - and when checking the prices for shipping, take into account that you'll probably want to 'deluxe' option - tracking at the least and probably insurance, etc. Write ...


4

When I moved from the US to the UK I found it was much cheaper to use my baggage allotment on the airplane and ship the rest by air freight. It takes a few days more but it is much more economical as excess baggage charges on the airlines are astronomical!


3

Both answers to your questions are your carrier :) Carrier's certificate and release order .. This is something your carrier needs to sign, and it basically says "We made sure that the person who gave us this bag also claims ownership of it. They packed it themselves, etc, etc". Don't fill that out. They're sending it on your behalf, so they are obligated ...


3

Be sure to state on the customs form that the books are your property and that they have been in the family for a long time, ie: not recent purchases. 2 years ago I shipped a painting back to the UK from the USA using the Post Office, and it was held in customs in the UK while I disputed their request to pay a large sum of VAT on it. Contacting the correct ...


3

For transatlantic flights you generally receive a free baggage allowance of 1 or 2 checked bags depending on the carrier and class of your ticket. The price of additional bags varies with carrier, class, and sometimes route. For US Airways on transatlantic trips one bag is free, the 2nd bag costs $100 and the 3rd and 4th bags would cots $200 each. Baggage ...


3

Depending on how much and how heavy you have few options: Air freight This is the fastest and easiest way, but it's also most expensive. Pricing is per weight, but there is also limit on volume. Minimum charged weight is 45kg (100lbs) which means minimum charge of about €100, subsequent charges actually drop. Here is example from US Airways Cargo: ...


2

If you are moving to take a job, do ask your employer if they cover relocation costs. My employer did (up to a modest maximum), so I shipped some of my belongings even though it would have been cheaper to buy new. It is more work to buy everything new, in particular since you have to find out the right kind of stores for kitchenware, hardware, the right ...


2

I have often seen people do that, so it's definitely possible. If you value the content I would use a lot of tape and wrap it all around the box in all directions; tape is much more resistant to ripping than a cardboard box. Of course, as others mentioned, check for weight and size limits. It might be a good plan to pick the airline according to extra ...


1

I see it done a lot in Asia. People traveling (not necessarily moving, per se) with carton boxes instead of suitcases. Seems to work for them. I did it myself a few times, to take some alcohol samples to a client. As I knew I wouldn't have check-in luggage on the way back, instead of taking a suitcase, I put my samples in a carton box, packed with lots of ...


1

This is only a partial answer, but you could consider going there by freight ship. There are travel agencies that offer cabins on cargoships. On a cabin you can bring quite some luggage. Shipping separately is also an option and sometime quite interesting if you manage to find a handler. Sometimes they offer in terms of volumes and not in weight. There ...


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