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6

The validity of the medical examination is the subject of 9 FAM 302.2-3(C), and in most cases it is valid for 6 months. This isn't the only clock that is running, as there is also a requirement in law to enter the US within 6 months of the visa interview while police certificates and photographs have their own (longer) expiration schedule, but in the typical ...


4

I don’t have personal experience to draw on, however the IELTS website states that its test centres have a number of ways to help test takers with special requirements. For example, you can request a modified version of IELTS, or special arrangements to be made, e.g. extra time, by giving the test centre notice. https://www.ielts.org/book-a-test/special-...


3

The USCIS website that I posted as a comment is specifically for USCIS in the US. I was not able to find any information on the US Embassy in London's website about accommodations for disabilities. However, because this is a BIG thing in the US, I would expect that some accommodations would be made. The USCIS webpage (link above) mentions a form I-648 but ...


3

From my experience, you would be better off buying private insurance in the country you're going to, if you're going there for a prolong period of time. If you keep traveling around and never staying at one place for more than a month or two - go to an insurance company at the country of your citizenship and get a travel insurance. I you're moving somewhere ...


2

I put a close friend in the country in which I live, if I have one that I'd trust to immediately get into contact with family (etc) in the event of something bad happening. The idea being that if police/hospital need to immediately know things about me (medical history or suchlike) they have a person they can get in touch with without having to worry about ...


2

For your first question, yes, you will not be held responsible for "emergency Medicaid" expenses. But emergency Medicaid is not really a regular medical insurance; it's only for emergencies; it won't cover you for normal sickness. For your second question, I can find you the relevant law, but I can't tell you exactly what it means. The "Welfare Reform Act ...


2

There is not a lot of "active ingridients" in various medicines that are not allowed in US or Canada but are allowed elsewhere in the world. Chances are that the medicine you seek is available in Canada under a different brand name or as a generic. If the issue is specific dosage then again you should look to see what is available because same medicine may ...


2

Not all substances that are government-controlled in the US are so controlled in Canada (and vice versa), so this may or may not matter. Book an appointment with a Canadian family doctor/general practitioner. Bring as many of your US doctor's records as you are able (or have your US doctor forward your records to your new Canadian doctor). Bring copies of ...


2

As a citizen from a member of the European Union, there are no particular problems to work in France. https://www.service-public.fr/particuliers/vosdroits/F2651 The French title for physiotherapist is kinésithérapeute. To work as a kinésithérapeute in France, you need an official diploma. If you are from another country, you need to check whether the ...


2

Yes. In fact some countries don't even have an approved testing clinic, so they HAVE to go elsewhere. As long as you get it done at one of the approved locations listed here you'll be eligible.


1

As a tourist in France, without health insurance, you simple pay the bill of the doctor. Going to a local doctor, that speaks your language, togeather with a printout of what is needed would seem to me the best way to find out what it costs. As to you being in France without a visa, when you need a visa, is something that should also be asked in the ...


1

In general, F-1 students must enroll full time. This page from Homeland Security explains the exceptions, particularly that you can remain in F-1 status without enrolling full time in case of properly documented illness or medical condition, for up to 12 months. This is based on federal regulation 8 CFR 214.2(f)(6)(iii)(B). Unfortunately there isn't a ...


1

Working backwards: Kidney stones are a form of kidney disease (https://www.kidney.org/blog/ask-doctor/having-kidney-stones-considered-having-kidney-disease) so you should answer yes. If the doctor needs something from your medical records that you did not bring, they will unlikely be able to access them directly and it can cause delays in the visa ...


1

At the time you plan to enter Canada, it will be more than a year since you were tested, as required for the issuance of your visa. Government of Canada Immigration notes that (added emphasis mine): Your medical exam results are valid for 12 months only. If you do not come to Canada as a visitor, student or worker within that time, you may need to have ...


1

According the Canada Immigration and Citizenship, the medical exam which Canada requires, whether it be for visiting, residency, or employment, must be valid when you present yourself at the border for entry. The exam results are valid for 12 months from when they were issued and, if you don't enter Canada as a visitor, student or worker within that time, ...


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