12

The US does not generally restrict its citizens from having other nationalities. This doesn't depend on the number of other nationalities. The same caveats that apply to dual nationality also apply, however. Taking another nationality is one of the statutory "potentially expatriating acts," but one cannot be deprived of US citizenship involuntarily, so ...


6

While I agree with Gaël Laurans that this will mostly be a matter of the respective international sport federations, the choice does not necessarily have to be for life. As a specific example, there is an ice hockey player who represented Canada on the 1994 Winter Olympics and the Czech Republic on this year's Olympics. This might still, however, be possible ...


6

As far as I know, such rules are set by international sport federations so they differ from sport to sport. I don't know many details but it's often impossible to play for several national teams or selections in your career. Once you went to a world cup or olympic games or were selected for an official game, you are typically committed for life. However, ...


5

An adult can gain a citizenship involuntarily if his/her hometown is annexed by another country. The most recent example is annexation of Crimea by the Russian Federation. Ukrainian online newspaper EuroMaidan Press reports that: According to Article 4 of the Russian law from 23 March 2014 “On the Acceptance of Crimea into the Russian Federation” ...


5

Things I've thought of so far: A non-Iranian woman who marries an Iranian man involuntarily, instantaneously and automatically receives Iranian citizenship [0]. An adult adopted by another adult may receive citizenship, although I don't know for which countries this is the case, or if it happens involuntarily. (If you know of any countries that do this, ...


4

They would have three citizenships automatically, although you would need to do the paperwork to register them in all the countries. More specifically, all children born in the US are Americans (with some rare exceptions for diplomats etc), and all children born to Dutch or UK nationals inherit those citizenships as well. Belgium would be the exception ...


4

There is no limit, unless the countries you have a citizenship in limit them. Britain for example doesn't care whether you have a citizenship in an other country or not (since the British Nationality Act of 1948). However South Africa does not allow multiple citizenships, unless you ask them for permission before getting a new citizenship from them. I don't ...


3

In principle, this may be possible, with caveats. From Egyptian nationality law: Therefore, even if the child [born abroad] is registered with the Egyptian authorities and given an Egyptian birth certificate (proof of Egyptian citizenship), it is unclear whether Egypt would recognize the foreign citizenship at all in official contexts. From Australian ...


3

Triple nationality is definitely possible. My children have US citizenship (through their mother and their place of birth), UK citizenship (through me) and NZ citizenship (through naturalization).


3

I can't prove a negative, but basically, no, the only meaningful distinction is between "one citizenship" and "more than one". By and large, the countries of the world fall into two camps: Having another citizenship is OK. Having another citizenship is not OK, and we'll take away ours if you get one. The countries in the first camp do not care how many ...


2

According to Pakistani Nationality Law: s. 14 If you hold a citizenship outside of Pakistan the Pakistani citizenship is terminated Unless one decides to renounce the other Unless one has citizenship in Britain or its colonies Unless one is a female married to a man who is not a Pakistani citizen and s. 14A If a person pledges ...


2

This question has a good answer in the duplicate, but for your specific situation: UK, USA, AUS, and NZ are no problem to hold multiple citizenships. However, it can get expensive to maintain up-to-date passports for all of them. The one you may have more difficulty with is Japan, as Japanese nationality law does not generally support multiple citizenships (...


2

As SztupY mentioned, you need to request permission retain your South African citizenship on gaining any other citizenship. If you are not granted such permission, you will lose South African citizenship. I am a little worried you may have lost your South African citizenship on gaining Polish citizenship. Requesting Retention If you are in the UK / London,...


1

Japan, Korea and Singapore do not allow dual citizenship. You would have to abandon other citizenships in order to get one of these.


1

There is a special rule to simplify naturalisation for former German citizens (reacquisition) and it does not seem to require giving up any other citizenship the applicant might have (all that stems from a distinct part of the law which doesn't seem to apply here). That would seem the logical route to try. Do note that this is a so-called Kann-Einbürgerung, ...


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