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10

To immigrate to the US based on this site you should put your first name to the last name field, and put FNU to the first name. No first/last name Some people in South India have only one name or all the names are written in the column of a given name or surname and other field is blank. If both the given name (first name) and surname (last name)...


10

The "problem" of naming children as an expat is usually quite complex, but for your actual problem it's fortunately quite simple: yes, it's possible to have the child's British passport contain practically any name you want, as in Britain the naming laws are very lenient. You can also change your child's name (if all parents consent to this) using a deed ...


6

The most common type of Chinese name uses one character or syllable for the family name and two characters or syllables for the given name. E.g. MAO Zedong, ZHOU Enlai and XI Jinping. If this applied to all Chinese names, it would be easy to figure out which part is the family name and which part is the given name. However, names consisting of one character ...


6

From the Deed Poll site: If you cannot get your [non-British] passport changed to your new name, you may find your Deed Poll will not be accepted by all UK government departments, companies and organisations on the grounds that your are not changing your name "for all purposes". So while it's possible to change your name in the UK if you cannot get your ...


6

Joao Gomez would, in this case, be correct. The father's surname is used in US documents. Other names are included in the Middle Names category.


6

I think you're asking the question a bit too late, since she has already changed her name in the US. The new name is right there - on the marriage certificate. Now, you need to bring all the rest of the documentation up to date with the new name.


6

You do not submit anything to USCIS to get approval for B2 visa. USCIS doesn't approve any visas, that's the State Department's job. Specifically - the US consulate at which your parents are going to apply. Your story sounds plausible and these things happen. If they ask about the discrepancy (if...) - just have your parents explain it as it is. The best ...


6

When a US form asks for "full name", it means the sequence of names as written on your birth certificate or other official documentation (such as passport). In your case, your first name (usually the name you are known by) is the "first name" and your remaining prénoms would be the "middle name(s)". In your example: First name: Alexis Middle name(s): ...


5

You will need petition the court to change your name officially this will likely need to happen where you live but as an example you can look at the New York City's court page. Once that is done you will have to file an I-90 form pay the appropriate fees (see item (E)) and once it's processed and approved you will receive a new card. Once done you will ...


4

I know a few people without first or last name (they are from Indonesia). IIRC, they split their name more-or-less arbitrarily or added a nickname as first name and managed that way. One caveat is that the Indonesian authorities were apparently willing to put something like that in their passport in the first place. I also know people whose name was ...


4

This is not a problem. The relevant questions from the Family Settlement Application Form are: 1.2 Family name (as shown in your passport) 1.3 Other names (including any other names you are known by and/or any other names that you have been known by) (Other forms for other visa types all seem similar, if you're filling out a different one then follow the ...


4

I have two middle names (I'm from the UK, living in the US), and I have this problem. My solution is to write in both middle names if I can, and if not, just put the first. I find that official forms often ignore the second middle name (the third prename) - even if I add it to the form, when I get (say) a letter back, the second is dropped. Similarly forms ...


3

In most administrative forms, you will see a field for "middle name". That's where you'd put your second and third given names, separated by spaces. For non-governmental business, eg bank, phone company, etc., usage of anything but your first given name is not usually required. I'd recommend not using your middle names as it can cause confusion: for ...


2

I always write my family name first, but in capital letters. This way it should be pretty clear to people that is my surname. Otherwise there's simply no reliable way to tell. One-character names are very common (in fact it was the only type of first name up to until about 1000 years ago, when due to influence from northern minorities two-character names ...


2

You may be able to get by with having a statement that confirms that both names are yours and have the embassy notarize the statement. Although they're not usually notarized, this type of statement occurs in the US when doing things like getting a mortgage. I've had to attest/confirm that 'LASTNAME FIRSTNAME', FIRSTNAME LASTNAME, FIRSTNAME MIDDLEINITIAL ...


2

It actually seems to be simpler than you expect. https://www.service-public.fr/particuliers/vosdroits/F1343 There's a distinction between nom de famille and nom d'usage according to the above link. (edit) As @jpatokal mentions, it's in fact possible to change your nom de famille as described here : https://www.service-public.fr/particuliers/vosdroits/...


1

tl;dr: Look for "מי חמצן". This compound - whose formula is H2O2 - has a specific Hebrew name; or rather, two such names. Unofficially and commonly, it's known as מי חמצן. Translated, that's "Oxygen Water", and transliterated: "Mei Hamtzan". The official chemical name is מימן על-חמצני (Hebrew Wikipedia). Pharmacies/"pharm" stores typically stock it, and ...


1

I'm not sure what your name is in France, but why not try to legally change it to "Y X"? (Or "X"; it's not entirely clear to me which one you'd prefer.) Per Changement de nom de famille pour motif légitime, you can change your last name in order to: consacrer l'usage constant et continu d'un nom, si vous utilisez cet autre nom depuis longtemps et qu'il ...


1

Note: Assuming your wife is a Polish citizen. Things might be more complicated in case of dual citizenship. This is something that should be handled by the Polish embassy in your country of residence, the UK in this case. Assuming you have the required paperwork, the process shouldn't require you to travel to Poland and will be handled by your embassy in ...


1

Your old Biometric permit is still valid. Applying for a new one does invalidate the old one. Also, there is nothing that I can find in the immigration rules that states that the name in your passport must absolutely match the name in you BRP, a point that wouldn't apply to you anyway. You may face some issues later when/if you ever decide to get another ...


1

In the UK you don't need to do anything to change your name, just start calling yourself something different, but institutions usually require to use a Deed Poll to have something officially looking that shows your new name. You can fill in a deed poll even if you're new to the country and don't plan on settle down, although it's usefulness is of course ...


1

I am American and have three first names. At the DMV where you could get an identification card or driver's license, they made me record my first first name as my first name, my second first name as a middle name and they completely left out my third first name. However, if your first name is hyphenated, like "Alexis- Bernard" they will record that as your ...


1

We've just went through a name-change (before acquiring British citizenship) with the help of the Hungarian Consulate in Edinburgh. (It's a much smaller establishment than the London one so you might get a better more personalized support) You need a deed poll, and a couple documents showing your new name. We have provided a driving licence, a debit card ...


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