7

You can say Romanian/Hungarian without shame. You just aren't around the right people. In any case there is, for several countries, an actual legal distinction between 'nationality' and 'citizenship'. You are a dual citizen of both Romania and Hungaria. Anybody who has citizenship of a country also has that nationality. The obverse is not necessarily true. ...


6

The child is automatically (and involuntarily) a U.S. citizen at birth. The relevant law is INA 301 (also known as 8 USC § 1401), specifically in this case INA 301(g) (one U.S. citizen parent and one non-U.S. national parent): The following shall be nationals and citizens of the United States at birth: [...] (g) a person born outside the ...


6

The UK government doesn't have a say about where you choose to live. If you can find another country which will grant you residency or even citizenship, you can choose to live there instead and there's nothing the UK government can possibly do about it. You don't even have to tell them you're leaving. This isn't necessarily true for all countries, there are ...


5

An adult can gain a citizenship involuntarily if his/her hometown is annexed by another country. The most recent example is annexation of Crimea by the Russian Federation. Ukrainian online newspaper EuroMaidan Press reports that: According to Article 4 of the Russian law from 23 March 2014 “On the Acceptance of Crimea into the Russian Federation” ...


5

Things I've thought of so far: A non-Iranian woman who marries an Iranian man involuntarily, instantaneously and automatically receives Iranian citizenship [0]. An adult adopted by another adult may receive citizenship, although I don't know for which countries this is the case, or if it happens involuntarily. (If you know of any countries that do this, ...


5

This is now becoming more common for people to be born or grow up in one location and end up living somewhere else and move many times every few years. Thus the question where are you from is getting hard to answer? Honestly, Its hard to use a single word, global-citizen comes very close. So usually I have a quick 30 sec elevator speech ready that helps ...


5

They will be stateless; not a citizen of any country. That can also happen if a country dissolves without a successor. Some countries accept such people as travelers, some not. You could just normally apply for a visa. It can become quite complicated to get a passport, so typically, as a stateless person, you have to keep whatever paperwork you have that ...


5

According to the law of nationality (another reference) you should be recognized as having Cambodian/Khmer citizenship by the government of Cambodia. Article 4: Shall obtain khmer nationality/citizenship regardless of the place of birth for: any legitimate child who is born from a parent ( a mother or father) who has khmer nationality/ ...


5

From immihelp.com: U.S. National All U.S. citizens are U.S. nationals, but there are some who are U.S. nationals but are not U.S. citizens. Definition U.S. national is a person born in or having ties with "an outlying possession of the United States" which is as of 2005, only American Samoa and Swains Island. Additionally,...


4

There is no limit, unless the countries you have a citizenship in limit them. Britain for example doesn't care whether you have a citizenship in an other country or not (since the British Nationality Act of 1948). However South Africa does not allow multiple citizenships, unless you ask them for permission before getting a new citizenship from them. I don't ...


4

Reading about all this in English is a bit confusing. “Possession d'état de Français” has a more specific meaning: It means being treated as a French citizen by the French authorities. Concretely, you need something like having been granted a passport, voting, or serving in the French army. As far as I can tell from your question, nobody in your family has ...


4

Unless you get married to a UK citizen (in which case different laws apply), the earliest you can get a citizenship is after six (6) years after you have first arrived in the UK for the purpose of living there. It doesn't matter whether you are studying, working, or just living in the country on your own being self-sufficient. Why six? It is because you ...


4

They would have three citizenships automatically, although you would need to do the paperwork to register them in all the countries. More specifically, all children born in the US are Americans (with some rare exceptions for diplomats etc), and all children born to Dutch or UK nationals inherit those citizenships as well. Belgium would be the exception ...


4

I would be very careful with that. There might be a loophole but it does not necessarily offer a strong protection against the loss of your Dutch citizenship. This particular part of the law is clearly intended for people who acquire some unrelated citizenship during their life (especially if they are Dutch citizens by birth) and does not deal with the ...


4

Well, there's a great thread on reddit from a few years back on this. Some key points: most countries, including the US, will not allow voluntary renouncing of citizenship unless you can provide evidence you have another citizenship to fall back onto one of the commenters renounced their Soviet citizenship in 1990 and lived in Finland for 8 years before ...


3

The general guidance for children born overseas, including adopted children, is here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-on-how-adopted-children-can-become-british/intercountry-adoption-and-british-citizenship It is possible that he is automatically a British citizen but only if the adoption was certified as in accordance with the Hague ...


3

The form that seems relevant to your case is here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/application-to-register-child-under-18-as-british-citizen-form-mn1 Unfortunately it is not so clear if you will be successful in your application. But it does appear possible to try. You'd be relying on the discretion of the British Home Secretary because your ...


3

“Acquiring” French citizenship is not quite the right way to think about this. If your father was a French citizen at the time of your birth, you might be one too. If he wasn't, there is nothing he could do now to make you a French citizen. The fact that he could have “acquired” it is not relevant. The only way in which his cooperation would be useful is in ...


3

You must apply for a new biometric residence permit within 3 months if your nationality changes. The British Residency Permit Guidance Notes have more information on this (bolds are my amendments): You must tell us as soon as you can if: you change your name (for example, because of marriage or by deed poll); you change your gender, legally or ...


3

A "US National" is a legal term and is so defined in 8 U.S.C. §1408 8 U.S.C. §1408 Definition of U.S. National ...the following shall be nationals, but not citizens, of the United States at birth: (1) A person born in an outlying possession of the United States on or after the date of formal acquisition of such possession; (2) A person born ...


3

You having a Hong Kong Permanent Identity Card means that you are (or were) a Hong Kong permanent resident. Neither having this card nor being a Hong Kong permanent resident means that you are a Chinese citizen. Hong Kong permanent residents can be Chinese citizens or foreign citizens. If you had an HKSAR passport, that would tell us that (at least Hong Kong ...


3

Holding UK citizenship is not something you need to give up for any reason, other than on the grounds of wanting to 'burn your past'. UK citizens (unlike US citizens) are only taxed by the UK government on income earned while resident in the UK. So if you upped sticks and went to live the life in Cyprus, you would have no further obligations to the UK. ...


3

The embassy probably doesn't know whether your father had Dutch nationality when you were born, since the circumstances governing this could include any of several things that they wouldn't have known about. The best way, and the way the Dutch government would go about it, would be to investigate the relevant points in his life. Before doing that, though, ...


2

As SztupY mentioned, you need to request permission retain your South African citizenship on gaining any other citizenship. If you are not granted such permission, you will lose South African citizenship. I am a little worried you may have lost your South African citizenship on gaining Polish citizenship. Requesting Retention If you are in the UK / London,...


2

The answer is NO, he is not a U.S. national. When you say "give up his U.S. citizenship", what is actually happening is he is giving up his U.S. nationality. He is giving up U.S. nationality according to 8 USC 1481(a)(5): (a) A person who is a national of the United States whether by birth or naturalization, shall lose his nationality by voluntarily ...


2

Flow in and out of the US is controlled by the Department of Homeland Security. They define a national to be: National - A person owing permanent allegiance to a state. It does not say that that permanent allegiance must be singular. That is, it doesn't restrict you to having allegiance to only one state. However, I think it's pretty clear that ...


2

In response to the question, you have become a British national after the birth of your child, so it cannot be simply passed on. British nationality is not retrospective; therefore only the child may be able to apply for indefinite leave to remain but this would be an issue depending on whether the mother is going to return to the UK. To be honest, it is ...


2

I'm happy to find people with a similar problem. My story is very alike as well. I've been struggling with this for quite a while. I look for an answer, do research, ask on the internet, monitor any similar topic on the web all the time. I used these options to call myself: Global citizen / World citizen / Citizen of the world Independent from my heritage ...


2

That's two, non-related, processes. If you are indeed French, you can apply for a passport at the nearest French consulate. You'll have to go there, you can't do this by post - they will take your fingerprints. As for renouncing your Indian citizenship, it is not required by France. And, more importantly, if you're planning to stay in India, you would need ...


2

Your daughter probably lost her Dutch nationality on 1 April 2013, 10 years after the dual nationality rule change in 2003. The rule that went into effect then is that a Dutch citizen who has other nationality and lives outside the kingdom or the EU for 10 years loses Dutch nationality. If that is true, it would explain the failure of her earlier passport ...


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